• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Dejah

Dan Tart Cook-off I

120 posts in this topic

This thread is for Dan Tart, or Chinese egg custard tart.

Are you using puff pastry, 2 dough pastry, pie pastry?

How do you keep the custard from boiling over?

Do you keep a pan of water in the oven during the baking step?

Show all! Tell everything! No secrets allow among eGulleteers. :angry::biggrin:


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's 2 dough pastry?

Think it's time I dug out my Wei Chuan and Pei Mei cookbooks (I own full collection).


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What's 2 dough pastry?

Think it's time I dug out my Wei Chuan and Pei Mei cookbooks (I own full collection).

Snowangel,

I have been checking out my Pei Mei's Volume II. She calls them the inside and outside layer.

Wei Chuan calls them water-shortening dough and flaky dough.

BTW, how many volumes are there for Pei Mei?


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could someone post the Pei Mei recipe? Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do we get kicked out for using frozen? :huh:

can frozen pastry dough even be used for these??


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is the site of a very good e-friend, Joanne. I don't know how she did her site but I can't seem to get the urls to the specific recipes. Anyway, just click 'chinese dim sum, pastries and desserts' on the left menu. You'll see the 2 dough pastry/chinese pastry. There's also a how-to for siu mai/shao mai.

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
do we get kicked out for using frozen? :huh:

can frozen pastry dough even be used for these??

I have recipes that use a short pastry. I am sure frozen would work, but you may not achieve that layered flaky tart shell...me thinks...


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found a recipe in Essentials of Asian Cuisine by Corrine Tran and the pastry recipe actually looks easy enough for me to try. :biggrin:

Next question....

I just realized that these things are made in little fluted tins tins which I don't have...

anyway to get around this? :huh:

I may have to go to the store on Monday.


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I found a recipe in Essentials of Asian Cuisine by Corrine Tran and the pastry recipe actually looks easy enough for me to try. :biggrin:

Next question....

I just realized that these things are made in little fluted tins tins which I don't have...

anyway to get around this? :huh:

I may have to go to the store on Monday.

I have a bunch of fluted tins that are too small for the recipe (more like candy tins!) and others that are too large and sloped (mini brioche pans). I think I'm going to use my muffin pans! Okay, so they aren't fluted, but I can put the finished products into cupcake papers and they'll look reasonably like the real thing. :wacko:


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I found a recipe in Essentials of Asian Cuisine by Corrine Tran and the pastry recipe actually looks easy enough for me to try. :biggrin:

Next question....

I just realized that these things are made in little fluted tins tins which I don't have...

anyway to get around this? :huh:

I may have to go to the store on Monday.

I have a bunch of fluted tins that are too small for the recipe (more like candy tins!) and others that are too large and sloped (mini brioche pans). I think I'm going to use my muffin pans! Okay, so they aren't fluted, but I can put the finished products into cupcake papers and they'll look reasonably like the real thing. :wacko:

do you think they will work in muffin tins? I have muffin tins, mini muffin tins and popover tins.....


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the high end dim sum restaurants make very tiny sized egg tarts, roughly the size of mini muffins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
do you think they will work in muffin tins? I have muffin tins, mini muffin tins and popover tins.....

I don't see why not... I'll press the pastry about halfway up the sides to compensate for the greater depth. They might be a little harder to unmold than individual tins, but the recipe I have calls for lining up the individual tins on a baking sheet anyway. Can't hurt to try it! That'll be my experiment, anyway.


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will be using muffin tins, regular size ones. There is enough "fat" in the pastry that unmolding shouldn't be a problem. Having said that.... :unsure:


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks guys, muffin tins it is!

you just saved me some money..... :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I use muffin tins for all sorts of little tarts including these cute little key lime tarts that nobody guesses were formed from muffin tins. The only reason why I wouldn't use it for dan tat is that I wouldn't know how to get it out of hte pan easily, but if you can figure it out, I'd love to hear about it.

So about the two dough pastry, I have never been privy to a professional kitchen but it seems to me that they take long layers of dough and fold each of the two doughs over each other until they have a bunch of layers. Then I am guessing they stamp out each individual tart. Then maybe they reuse the trimmings as base for the shortening dough or something. The fact that you can see the layers on the cooked product suggests this manner of production to me. What do you think? I personally think the Wei-Chuan recipe is a crock of **** but gives hints to what I think we're actually supposed to be doing.

Actually, I don't think using fluted tins is right either. They have to be round little baby pie pan thingies, I thought, the better to show off the many layers of the crust, right?


Edited by jschyun (log)

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, I don't think using fluted tins is right either.  They have to be round little baby pie pan thingies, I thought, the better to show off the many layers of the crust, right?

When I've bought dan tat for takeout, they've been in little foil pie pans & look like the pastry was rolled out the cut with a fluted biscuit cutter.


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, I use muffin tins for all sorts of little tarts including these cute little key lime tarts that nobody guesses were formed from muffin tins. The only reason why I wouldn't use it for dan tat is that I wouldn't know how to get it out of hte pan easily, but if you can figure it out, I'd love to hear about it.

If the crust is sturdy enough it should be easy enough to lift out. If not, maybe you could line the muffin cups with foil and use the foil to lift them out.

So about the two dough pastry, I have never been privy to a professional kitchen but it seems to me that they take long layers of dough and fold each of the two doughs over each other until they have a bunch of layers.  Then I am guessing they stamp out each individual tart.  Then maybe they reuse the trimmings as base for the shortening dough or something.  The fact that you can see the layers on the cooked product suggests this manner of production to me.  What do you think?  I personally think the Wei-Chuan recipe is a crock of **** but gives hints to what I think we're actually supposed to be doing.

Right now I'm guessing it's similar to a French puff pastry, but with fewer folds so that the layers are still distinct. I was hoping someone would post the Pei Mei recipe because I remember she does something similar. Anyone?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you can read Chinese, here is a recipe of Dan Tart in Leisure-Cat.com:

http://www.leisure-cat.com/frm_1176.htm

Um, not NEARLY enough. lol I can sort of make out the ingredient list. Let's see, the dough has an "oil skin" part and a "water skin" part. The oil skin has flour, butter, and lard. The water skin has flour, egg, and water. Can't read the directions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ohh, dan tart. I'd really like to make this, but my parents have explicitly told me not to make it. "Why make something so cheap?" Honestly, they're the most expensive item (by weight/size) in bakeries, at the same price as a bun. I even have these strange tart/brioche hybrid tins that I could use for some enormongous* dan tart.

*Not a real word

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ohh, dan tart. I'd really like to make this, but my parents have explicitly told me not to make it. "Why make something so cheap?" Honestly, they're the most expensive item (by weight/size) in bakeries, at the same price as a bun. I even have these strange tart/brioche hybrid tins that I could use for some enormongous* dan tart.

*Not a real word

Go ahead and make these "enormongous" dan tarts anyway! The size would be like the custard pies we bought in England. Most people would share one among 4 friends. I ate a whole one by myself! But then, that was when I was pregnant and ate alot. :wink:


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made my first batch of dan tart, and was very disappointed in the results. I used a recipe from Wei-Chuan's Chinese Dim sum book.

I actually followed the recipe( for the first time in my life without wavering) to a gram by using a newly purchased electronic scale. Followed the instructions carefully, but it must be my technique in rolling the dough with the two layers.

The filling was a terrible colour...very pale yellow with a greyish tinge. Did not look appetizing at all. It used eggs, water and sugar.

I tasted 1/4 of one, and man! The pastry was chewy on the bottom inspite of having layers.

The instructions said to crimp the edges, so I did. Can't see any layers when you do that.

So, I have another recipe done up and 12 are now in the oven. This is a recipe by Rhonda Yee. She uses a recipe with butter and lard...single layer. None of this outsy and innsy stuff. The filling called for eggs, milk and half'n'half. I thought the colour was still too pale, so for 3 of the tarts, I added the tiniest dab of yellow cake decorating colour.

We'll see what happens. I took pictures of the process from the first batch, and the rexults before I threw them into the garbage. The seond batch, I didn't take pictures of the process but I will post the results.

"sigh" :unsure:


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dejah, sorry to hear about your problems. Based on my past experience making custard pies, I think these are going to be a bit tricky.


Edited by sheetz (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
.....The filling was a terrible colour...very pale yellow with a greyish tinge. Did not look appetizing at all. It used eggs, water and sugar.

.....

The filling called for eggs, milk and half'n'half. I thought the colour was still too pale, so for 3 of the tarts, I added the tiniest dab of yellow cake decorating colour.

.....

Did you use only egg york or both egg york and egg white in making the filling?

I think egg tarts are very difficult to make well. That's why I am disappointed by many Chinese bakeries in my neighborhood. May be they have the same issues.

Keep trying. I am sure you can make some good ones in the end.

I understand tarts are western bakery concepts. But are Egg Tarts a unique Hong Kongers' creation? Anybody knows?


Edited by hzrt8w (log)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I actually followed the recipe( for the first time in my life without wavering) to a gram by using a newly purchased electronic scale. Followed the instructions carefully, but it must be my technique in rolling the dough with the two layers.

There are so many recipes out there in making tarts.

Can you describe the recipe that you were following where the result was not up to par?


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      I was recently asked by a friend to give a talk to a group of around 30 first-year students in a local college - all girls. The students were allowed to present me with a range of topics to choose from. To my joy, No. 1 was food! They wanted to know what is different between western and Chinese food. Big topic!
       
      Anyway I did my best to explain, illustrate etc. I even gave each student a home made Scotch egg! Which amused them immensely.

      Later, my friend asked each of them to write out (in English) a recipe for their favourite Chinese dish. She has passed these on to me with permission to use them as I wish. I will post a few of the better / more interesting ones over the next few days.

      I have not edited their language, so please be tolerant and remember that for many of these students, English is their third or fourth language. Chinese isn't even their first!

      I have obscured some personal details.

      First up:

      Tomato, egg noodles.

      Time: 10 minutes
       
      Yield: 1 serving

      For the noodle:

      1 tomato
      2 egg
      5 spring onions

      For the sauce:
       
      1 teaspoon sesame oil
      1 tablespoon sugar
      ½ teaspoon salt

      Method:

      1. The pot boil water. At that same time you can do something else.

      2. Diced tomato. Egg into the bowl. add salt and sugar mixed. Onion cut section.

      3. Boiled noodles with water and cook for about 5 minutes.

      4. Heat wok put oil, add eggs, stir fry until cooked. Another pot, garlic stir fry the tomato.

      5. add some water to boil, add salt, soy sauce, add egg
       
      6. The tomato and egg sauce over noodle, spring onion sprinkled even better.
       


      More soon.
    • By zend
      I just bought these greens from the neighborhood Asian grocery. Had them once in China as a salad, and they tasted exceptional - a bit peppery like arugula, yet much more subtle and fresh, with hints of lemon.
      Store lady (non-Chinese) could not name them for me other than "Chinese greens".
      Any help identifying them is greatly appreciated
       

    • By liuzhou
      China's plan to cut meat consumption by 50%
       
      I wish them well, but can't see it happening. Meat eating is very much seen as a status symbol and, although most Chinese still follow a largely vegetable diet out of economic necessity, meat is still highly desirable among the new middle classes. The chances of them willingly giving it up, even by 50%, seems remote to me.
    • By JohnT
      I have been asked to make Chinese Bow Tie desserts for a function. However, I have never made them, but using Mr Google, there are a number of different recipes out there. Does anybody have a decent recipe which is tried and tested? - these are for deep-fried pastry which are then soaked in sugar syrup.
    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.