Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Marrow Bones


Jesse_March
 Share

Recommended Posts

Well, this American loves marrow, however it's prepared. Oddly, my mom, usually a pretty adventurous eater, does not like it. I think that's a residual effect...apparently, my dad's family used to sit around the table cracking open chicken bones and sucking the inside out. Guess that turned her off...

But she certainly ate the little bit of it on her plate next to the sirloin and short rib at Hearth! :raz: I didn't have the heart to tell her what it had been.

And, yes, it appears on menus pretty frequently in these parts. In fact, I just had some a few weeks ago at Cafe D'Alsace on 2nd Avenue.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For its curiosity value, for all of you whether you love or hate marrow, it was so prized in olden timesthat it was felt necessary to be able to counterfeit it.

From An Anonymous Andalusian manuscript of the Thirteenth Century

“The Making of Marrow Without Marrow, Which No One Will Suspect”.

“Take fresh kidney meat and remove its veins, and peel off the spleen its under-skin; take one part of the spleen, and five parts of clean kidney fat; pound all this until it is like brains, and stuff this into tripe or large intestines or cane tubes or the like, and boil it in a pot of tafaya; take it out and empty it into a serving dish and serve it hot.”

Edited by The Old Foodie (log)

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does this mean bones are going to get expensive? Where can I find me some spleen and kidney fat?

Actually that counterfeit recipe would probably taste pretty much identical to marrow being nothing more than blood with a bit of connective tissue and fat.

Maybe the well stocked kitchen store could sell empty bones to stuff it in, just like the shells for coquille St Jacques.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love marrow roasted. Well, with a little salt, pepper. and garlic. In fact it is amazing to eat. Yes, I think most people are afraid of it because it is unusual and because of the fat content. So for comfort and predictability, they get a Big Mac.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always wanted marrow spoons! I now have Oxo implements, purchased at Zabar's as lobster forks. One end has a little fork, the other end a very small spoon. So now I have marrow spoons. Not silver, which would be comme il faut, but they do the job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd never had marrow bones before preparing them for my parent's anniversary dinner when I was 19 and cooking out of the French Laundry cookbook. I decided against telling them what exactly they were eating (Dad's a meat and potatoes guy; Mom cooks permanately with "cream of..." soup). They both loved the marrow and asked for more to spread on the french bread I made.

The biggest surprise came when I repeated the braised short ribs with bone marrow menu for my entire family - including my (at the time) six year old nephew. I had to explain to him what he was eating, and he still asked for more. Of course this is the same kid I took to the farmer's market and when he pointed to the cleaned and skinned rabbits and asked what they were I told him they were like the family's pet bunny, but intended for cooking instead of petting. He wasn't grossed out, he didn't flinch...he only asked when "Aunt Shannon" was going to cook Clarice (the pet rabbit's name). "She's a little too old and tough," I said.

Anyway, back to the marrow, I always use the technique described in "The French Laundry Cookbook." Haven't tried it in a restaurant. In fact, I'm not sure I've seen much of it on menus in Columbus, Ohio.

Shannon

my new blog: http://uninvitedleftovers.blogspot.com

"...but I'm good at being uncomfortable, so I can't stop changing all the time...be kind to me, or treat me mean...I'll make the most of it I'm an extraordinary machine."

-Fiona Apple, Extraordinary Machine

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd love to get marrow spoons because they're so pretty, but a chopstick works just as well. One little push and the entire marrow pellet pops out!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd love to get marrow spoons because they're so pretty, but a chopstick works just as well. One little push and the entire marrow pellet pops out!

I had some delicious bones at a restaurant in Dublin..can't remember the name but they were served in the traditional fashion with a spoon, some fresh brioche, sea salt and a small salad.

As god as they were I think I might like them in bordelaise more. The "beefy butter" description is about right which is why it pairs so nicely with beef in the first place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

resurrecting an old topic: marvelous marrow bones.

In Mexico marrow bones are boiled as part of the Puchero beef stew (and I think in Colombia they are part of Ajiaco aswell). When you are lucky enough to have a piece of bone with marrow in your stew/soup, you take a fresh tortilla, spread the "tuétano" (marrow) and add some salt! Heaven!

And since the marrow bones are usually coveted and we don't want to cause family troubles, you can buy extra bones to add to the stew, one for each family member!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...
I guess I am just wondering how come nobody out here appreciates marrow?  Are they scared?  I'd like to know what someone else thinks of this product.  If they might enjoy it as much as I.

Marrow has come a long way in recent years, at least in my world. As a kid I'd eat the bit from the t-bone but I didn't have any family elders making restorative potions or anything that featured marrow bones.

Inspired by Fergus Henderson's famous dish, I roasted some fresh beef bones for an open-faced marrow and parsley salad sandwich:

gallery_42214_5579_107548.jpg

The parsley salad is true to St. John's complete with capers, olive oil and lemon juice. I added horseradish mayo and lots of cracked black pepper and crunchy salt.

I love the stuff but only in modest quantities - any more than what's pictured above gets really rich really fast. My butcher charges $0.49/lb so a large femur shaft can be had for a dollar. Outrageous value.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forgot to add the before shot, as in before 20 minutes at 400F. Apparently this cow was walking on Friday, August 1st:

gallery_42214_5579_80903.jpg

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the stuff but only in modest quantities - any more than what's pictured above gets really rich really fast.

Very true. It's a nice appetizer, but not a main course. However, if you can't eat it all, leftover marrow is a great ingredient. I've mixed it with parmiggiano and spread it on bread, broiled it and used it to float on French onion soup. It's also great for steak sandwiches.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forgot to add the before shot, as in before 20 minutes at 400F. Apparently this cow was walking on Friday, August 1st:

gallery_42214_5579_80903.jpg

Oh that has really got me in the mood.

What bones are they?

It's the shaft of a leg bone from a Hereford that was cut up for me at the butcher's shop. I saw a big ball at one end but now that I think about it, I guess it could be a femur or a humerus - if cow bones are named like human bones.

Each piece is 2"-3" long and yielded a plump plug of marrow bigger than a wine cork but smaller than a marshmallow. Two pieces made the sandwich above.

My lunch guests balked when offered the marrow but wanted to know what it tasted like - ingrates! I told them it was like a luxurious beefy jello on the verge of liquefaction. Still no takers, maybe I should have said unctuous.

Edited by Peter the eater (log)

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...