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Good fish recipes


Thornado
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Hi,

So, here's the deal - I really don't like fish. Even if you try to prepare it in a good way, that typical fish flavor always comes through in a bad way.

I am however also aware that it is good to eat fish, and maybe maybe there can be a good way to cook fish. So, what's an excellent way to cook fish if you are not a fish lover? I want great recipes! :)

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If you don't like fish, you probably shouldn't cook it. Because it tastes like fish, and you don't like it.

Any "excellent" fish recipe, of course, will attempt to complement and accentuate the fish flavor, not hide it, as you appear to wish. You may want to consider whether you've been buying cheap-ass grocery store fish and, if so, find dedicated fishmonger who can give you something fresh. It could change your life, or at least your dinner.

If this doesn't work for you, I suggest those little capsules of fish oil from the health food store, Crispy whole fish in black bean sauce, or fish sticks. I hear Mrs. Paul's does a good job, and I prefer the tartar sauce with the picture of the grizzled sea-captain in the yellow slicker on the label.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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May be the quality of the fish you get is the real question. Supermarkets usually have stale fish, and even in NYC, I find many fishmongers disappointing. Go to a reputable guy or gal ( and I don't mean chinatown), and find a recipe that sounds good to you. Go with something normal first like Cod or sole then work your way into things like skate and branzino...Or, you can plunge head first into a lovely piece of Tuna and make a wasabi crust with it. You may find yourself loving it...Or you may hate it, then I say, go with what Busboy suggested about the capsules.

A word of advice: Cook the fish the same day you buy the fish, don't let it sit in your fridge, don't throw it in the freezer and expect a gourmet cuisine a week later. Make sure you want fish that day, go get it and make it.

As for preparation, the easier the better, I suggest pan roasting Cod or sole with some lemon morels and asparagus for beginners. Or Pan searing if you are aiming Tuna. Either way, you will learn something along the way.

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

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May be the quality of the fish you get is the real question.  Supermarkets usually have stale fish, and even in NYC, I find many fishmongers disappointing.  Go to a reputable guy or gal ( and I don't mean chinatown), and find a recipe that sounds good to you.  Go with something normal first like Cod or sole then work your way into things like skate and branzino...

Is it me, or is branzino the hip fish of the moment (or, given my DC location, last year's NY moment)? All the sudden it seems to be everywhere.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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I can't see how anyone can hate anything that 'tastes like fish' because most fish taste incredibly different from one another.

If you want something inoffensive yet still flavorful and tasty try these:

Get a steak of high quality sushi grade tuna. Rub kosher salt and cracked black pepper into each side, along with some mustard powder. Toss it into a greased screaming hot skillet until you get a little char, then flip it and do the same to the other side. Serve it up as is, you will have a slightly warm but still raw and delicious center, and a nice flavorful crust on the outside, also, no 'fishy' smell at all.

You could also get some cod fillets, slice them into slightly smaller pieces, make up a batch of beer batter, dip them, deep fry them, and serve them up with some malt vinegar and french fries, classic fish'n'chips.

Catfish soaked overnight in buttermilk, then rolled in a blend of cajun spices, cornmeal, and flour is another great candidate for the deep fryer.

If you can find Monkfish, it is great broiled with just a little butter and lemon, very similar to lobster.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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Also, what kind of fish have you tried?

Growing up my mother used to buy some kind of generic little white fish fillets from the grocery. Her only method of cooking them was rolled in crushed saltines and baked. Occassionally I'd get a breaded, deep-fried fish stick at school or at someone else's house. Based on this upbringing, I didn't much care for fish.

Then my first employer after college had a company picnic and grilled halibut steaks. Wow. I discovered that fish could be delicious. Unless you have tried a wide variety of fish, saying that you don't like it is like having mutton and deciding that you don't like meat. There is a vast difference between marlin and trout, or halibut and catfish, or Salmon and tuna, etc. If you haven't tried a grilled marlin or halibut, I'd give it a try.

You could always grill a salmon and cover it with raspberry beurre rouge, or a lemon-thyme dipping sauce, etc.

M. Thomas

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Even if you try to prepare it in a good way, that typical fish flavor always comes through in a bad way.

That's a tough one....................I'd say stay away from fish.You may want to try

very fresh fish just slow oven roasted until med-rare to med and a splash of lemon,or another juice if lemon is not up your alley,most work.

Do you eat fish and chips?

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I can't see how anyone can hate anything that 'tastes like fish' because most fish taste incredibly different from one another. 

If you want something inoffensive yet still flavorful and tasty try these:

Get a steak of high quality sushi grade tuna.  Rub kosher salt and cracked black pepper into each side, along with some mustard powder.  Toss it into a greased screaming hot skillet until you get a little char, then flip it and do the same to the other side.  Serve it up as is, you will have a slightly warm but still raw and delicious center, and a nice flavorful crust on the outside, also, no 'fishy' smell at all.

You could also get some cod fillets, slice them into slightly smaller pieces, make up a batch of beer batter, dip them, deep fry them, and serve them up with some malt vinegar and french fries, classic fish'n'chips. 

Catfish soaked overnight in buttermilk, then rolled in a blend of cajun spices, cornmeal, and flour is another great candidate for the deep fryer.

If you can find Monkfish, it is great broiled with just a little butter and lemon, very similar to lobster.

NulloModo,

Re: your easy and delicious suggestions for preparing fish........................... Will you marry me!? :wub:

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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If you are bothered by the fishiness then I have a couple of things to try. First, is your fish fresh? Fresh fish is not fishy. Fresh fish should smell like sea water, have a clear eye and be slimy. Also, you can soak your fish in milk for 10-15 minutes and this helps to eliminate some of the stronger tasting oils in fish. Bu sure to rinse and dry the fish after soaking it in milk.

Sophie

S. Cue

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Thornado, I read your thread-starting post and had the same reaction as most, if not all, responders here: you are probably not eating fresh fish. Scordelia is correct, most fresh fish does not smell "fishy". That "fishy" smell usually indicates that something has started to go. Just out of curiousity, where are you located?

There are a couple of rare/med-rare recipes mentioned here as well; great responses to "good fish recipes", but it is possible that you might not want to start with these. People who don't like fish because they don't like the flavour, sometimes actually don't like it because of the texture. I'm not saying this is the case with you, but it might be.

If you think this might be true, start with halibut or something with a similar "meaty" texture - perhaps this will make the transition from beef (or pork or whatever) to fish easier? Also go for a bigger meat-to-bone ratio first, because one might be discouraged from eating fish because of all the work avoiding pin bones etc. And yes absolutely use lemon or lime; in fact, if you really want all of the benefit without any "fishy" taste, drown the bugger in citrus as this will overpower the flavour.

Okay, finally, my own recipe suggestion, and it's an easy one: take a fillet of sole or something similar, dredge in flour, egg, then panko (or crushed breadcrumbs or crackers or even more flour) seasoned with salt, pepper and dill (or other herb you like), panfry in 1/2 butter 1/2 olive oil. Finish with a splash of lemon.

Hope you do overcome your aversion, because if you don't eat fish, you're missing out on a huge chapter of culinary possiblities! Good luck!

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Also, you can soak your fish in milk for 10-15 minutes and this helps to eliminate some of the stronger tasting oils in fish.

I've always wondered what the scientific basis for the milk soak is. Does this have something to do with the amino acids in milk?

"Instead of orange juice, I'm going to use the juice from the inside of the orange."- The Brilliant Sandra Lee

http://www.matthewnehrlingmba.com

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My suggestion is to stay away from the fattier fishes - salmon, tuna, bluefish, etc. They tend to have the strongest smells when cooking. Instead, start with the "white" fishes which have milder, sweeter flavors.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I have historically been a person who "doesn't like fish" and recently completed the turnaround. (Why do I feel like I'm at AA now? Nevermind!)

Basic principles:

* Go with a firm, white-fleshed fish without a strong flavor. Salmon is most definitely out -- even when people insist "Taste this, it's not fishy!" it's still fishy to me. I'd recommend catfish, grouper, tilapia, or monkfish for starters. Use it the day you buy it.

* Get them already filleted. Why bother with bones?

* Simple preparation is best, but bring in flavors beyond the fish. I have successfully braised catfish in milk and in coconut milk, and both were delicious. Alton Brown has a very good and very simple recipe for milk braising. If you use coconut milk, add in some cilantro, hot pepper sauce, ginger, and lime or lemongrass. Frying or blackening might also fit the bill, in that the fish flavor does not become the prominent flavor in the dish.

* Your sides are almost as important as your main dish prep. If you gave me a big slice of tilapia in butter and caper sauce I'd eat three bites and declare myself done. Serve it to me with smoked gouda polenta and some minted peas and I will be your friend forever.

Good luck, Thornado! I've done exactly what you're talking about and it is certainly possible. Also, although I'm not up to the challenge of cooking some of these dishes myself, I've enjoyed restaurant fish preparations that were incredibly tasty, like Cashew-Crusted Grouper in Rum-Butter Sauce, so keep an eye open when you're eating out as well. I have found most waiters to be accurate and truthful when I explain that I don't like a strong fish taste and want to know whether the grouper/cod/tuna/bluegill/sunfish is mild.

Cooking and writing and writing about cooking at the SIMMER blog

Pop culture commentary at Intrepid Media

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:raz: Love the milk and fish recipes.. Odd...Best way to make fish.. Need a dishwasher....Take steak or solid filets of fish. Olive oil on aluminum foil, spread around. Place fish on oiled aluminum foil. drizzle oil on top, couple of herbs, maybe slice of orange or lemon, fold aluminum foil to make packet. place packet on another sheet fo aluminun foil, rotating 90 degrees to make a new seal in the other direction. Seal and crimp shut the aluminum foil. Place on top rack of dishwasher and set on rinse/dry cycle, make sure heated dry light is on. Twenty two minutes later the dishwasher will turn off, dinner will be perfect.. Service with some rice and some veggies and it will be dinner perfection.. I have done this and it works.... :wacko:

Hi,

So, here's the deal - I really don't like fish. Even if you try to prepare it in a good way, that typical fish flavor always comes through in a bad way.

I am however also aware that it is good to eat fish, and maybe maybe there can be a good way to cook fish. So, what's an excellent way to cook fish if you are not a fish lover? I want great recipes! :)

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best fish recipe ever.........

ingredients, 3 kids, worms, bamboo poles, bobbers and line, a bluegill pond, coolers, ice and beer, sharp knives, stuff for breading, a cast iron skillet and some crisco.....did i mention beer........most impotantly, springtime and hungry fish........

special technique, as you catch the fish, throw them into your beer cooler, the beer will get a little slimy but just rinse off the cans in the pond before you drink them.

when the beer is gone, or the worms are gone, go home to clean the fish......

make the kids help you clean and fry the fish.....while you have a few more beers......

no side dishes are necessary for fresh fried bluegill, other than some tarter sauce, or some homemade horseradish sauce........

fish cooked in this manner are always delicious because you are so damned hungry by the time you get to eat them.....

and it's a spiritual thing too ...........

trust me on this one........

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best fish recipe ever.........

ingredients, 3 kids, worms, bamboo poles, bobbers and line, a bluegill pond, coolers, ice and beer, sharp knives, stuff for breading, a cast iron skillet and some crisco.....did i mention beer........most impotantly, springtime and hungry fish........

special technique, as you catch the fish, throw them into your beer cooler, the beer will get a little slimy but just rinse off the cans in the pond before you drink them.

when the beer is gone, or the worms are gone, go home to clean the fish......

make the kids help you clean and fry the fish.....while you have a few more beers......

no side dishes are necessary for fresh fried bluegill, other than some tarter sauce, or some homemade horseradish sauce........

fish cooked in this manner are always delicious because you are so damned hungry by the time you get to eat them.....

and it's a spiritual thing too ...........

trust me on this one........

:->

This reminds me of my childhood.

"Instead of orange juice, I'm going to use the juice from the inside of the orange."- The Brilliant Sandra Lee

http://www.matthewnehrlingmba.com

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Quite a few years ago, fish restaurants always had a few items for fish haters.

Usually steak, burgers, or chicken. But swordfish was always included in this category, and sometimes halibut or sole.

Alas, swordfish disappeared from the menus in the 1970's, and I never tried it. Does anyone know if it was truly the best tasting fish for fish haters?

Is it available today, on a limited scale, without mercury? Will it ever make a comeback?

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I can't see how anyone can hate anything that 'tastes like fish' because most fish taste incredibly different from one another. 

If you want something inoffensive yet still flavorful and tasty try these:

Get a steak of high quality sushi grade tuna.  Rub kosher salt and cracked black pepper into each side, along with some mustard powder.  Toss it into a greased screaming hot skillet until you get a little char, then flip it and do the same to the other side.  Serve it up as is, you will have a slightly warm but still raw and delicious center, and a nice flavorful crust on the outside, also, no 'fishy' smell at all.

You could also get some cod fillets, slice them into slightly smaller pieces, make up a batch of beer batter, dip them, deep fry them, and serve them up with some malt vinegar and french fries, classic fish'n'chips. 

Catfish soaked overnight in buttermilk, then rolled in a blend of cajun spices, cornmeal, and flour is another great candidate for the deep fryer.

If you can find Monkfish, it is great broiled with just a little butter and lemon, very similar to lobster.

NulloModo,

Re: your easy and delicious suggestions for preparing fish........................... Will you marry me!? :wub:

Wonderful....

Not that I took this seriously, but has there ever been a marriage between people who met on eG?

It looks like there are already some good suggestions. I have some recipes involving potatoes with the fish, which some guests who are not crazy over fish have enjoyed. One is served with a great sauce, over mashed potatoes, and another is the fairly common potato crusted fish dishes.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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You might want to try squeezing some lemon over the fish - folks I know say this kills the "fishy" taste. But I'm with the rest of the posters who said that if the fish tastes fishy, it's not fresh enough.

A lemony preparation I like is to start with filets of a mild white fish, sprinkle on lemon pepper seasoning, drizzle lightly with olive oil, and pop in a 400F oven until it's opaque and flakes easily.

Marcia.

Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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Quite a few years ago, fish restaurants always had a few items for fish haters.

Usually steak, burgers, or chicken.  But swordfish was always included in this category, and sometimes halibut or sole.

Alas, swordfish disappeared from the menus in the 1970's, and I never tried it. Does anyone know if it was truly the best tasting fish for fish haters?

Is it available today, on a limited scale, without mercury? Will it ever make a comeback?

Swordfish is all over the place. As for the mercury... What? You don't like mercury?

Unfortunately, mercury is a contaminant that is common in fish and it is particularly common in long-living or predatory fish. In most parts of the world the methylmercury is actually of natural origin.

But swordfish is still pretty common to American menus. The USDA warns some people against consuming too much, I believe, although I don't recall the guideline or to whom it applied.

Edited by carp (log)
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I have a fish hater in the family. Absolutely no fish need apply - with one exception. The fish hater has now declared that she loves halibut and that it does not have a "fishy" taste or smell.

I don't know where you live, but on the West Coast it is now halibut season. There is nothing like fresh halibut - frozen need not apply. I would suggest that you try halibut if you can get it fresh. There is simply nothing like it for delicacy and wonderful flavour.

Life is short, eat dessert first

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Make your own tartar sauce:

1 cup mayonnaise

1/4 cup finely chopped dill pickle

3 tablespoons chopped green onion

1 tablespoon capers, drained

1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon

1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Stir all ingredients in small bowl. Chill 1 hour. Keeps for a couple of days.

Recipe from Epicurious.com. Lavish.

Catherine

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I have a fish hater in the family.  Absolutely no fish need apply - with one exception.  The fish hater has now declared that she loves halibut and that it does not have a "fishy" taste or smell.

I don't know where you live, but on the West Coast it is now halibut season.  There is nothing like fresh halibut - frozen need not apply.  I would suggest that you try halibut if you can get it fresh.  There is simply nothing like it for delicacy and wonderful flavour.

yes; agree with this completely. Halibut also has a nice texture (on the firm side) and goes with many other flavors such as asian and mediterranean.

Do you like spicy food? If you have good asian restaurants near you another great avenue to explore are spicy thai or chinese preparations.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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