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Sriracha


Chris Amirault
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San Jose has the largest Vietnamese immigrant population of any city in the U.S. I can't imagine a Vietnamese restaurant here, especially a pho shop, that doesn't have a bottle of Huy Fong sriracha on the table. I think one could think of Huy Fong sriracha as Vietnamese-American sriracha. On the other hand, I can't recall ever seeing Huy Fong sriracha in any Thai restaurant. Perhaps it's unfortunate that Huy Fong gave their sauce the name they did rather than choosing another name.

In any case, I read this thread for the first time several weeks ago and got myself my first bottle of Huy Fong sriracha.

Is there a 12-step program for sriracha addicts? :raz:

Edited by esvoboda (log)
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Looks like there are two products that we can refer to Sriracha: The American version, invented by an American of Vietnamese origin in California, is the one that most of you seem to be familiar with. It's thick, bright red, and spicy and sour and the same time, with a healthy dose of garlic. The Thai version, on the other hand, is chunky, sweet/spicy, orange-red in color, and sort of 'jellylike', and is really only used as a dipping sauce for fried/grilled chicken. Incidentally, Sii Raachaa is the name of town in Chonburi province, but is known much more for its seafood than its dipping sauce. Most Thais would not associate Sri Racha as a brand/type of dipping sauce.

Austin

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Sriracha aka Hot Cock Sauce (to avoid confusion) is good on everything. Period. I have eaten it on chocolate ice cream and recommend this to anyone. The first time I tried it on plain canned tuna fish, I thought it wasn't very good, but as it turns out I simply wasn't using enough of it. Also delicious on any snack food. In desperate cases, I will eat it straight out of the bottle.

Jennie

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The first time I tried it on plain canned tuna fish, I thought it wasn't very good, but as it turns out I simply wasn't using enough of it. 

I find that this sriracha principle applies with all foodstuffs: tortilla chips, pork chops, raisin bran, flan, s'mores....

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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  • 2 months later...

mr roommate is positively frightened with the frequency that i use sriracha. when i come home from a long night cooking, i just can't help but to douse any leftover meat in the fridge with it. he cringes when i spray it onto leftover lamb leg on top of costco naan bread spread with goat cheese, but i caught him drooling over fried eggs positively drenched in the stuff the other morning. it's a bit of a proximity thing; the more you see that green-topped bottle, the more you are tempted to squeeze it.

probably something to do with the rooster.

god, i love the shit.

as an aside, the New England Culinary Institute is constantly running out of sriracha, as well as it's sister sauce nam-ploy. Between students dousing it on everything in the cafeteria (possibly to hide the flavor of dishes created by their junior peers), and chef-instructors dumping it into every conceivable sauce and marinade, Vermont might just have the highest "vietnamese" chili sauce consumption in the country.

Will cook for food.

jasonbissey@yahoo.com

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Vermont might just have the highest "vietnamese" chili sauce consumption in the country.

I'd hazard a wager that, though a fine state (even if its landmarks are falling apart), Vermont certainly runs a distant second to Rhode Island in sriracha consumption, what with there being lots of Southeast Asians, Johnson and Wales folks, university students, and just plain obsessives (like yours truly) spraying it yon and hither.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Just out in The Journal News, ARTICLE WITH RECIPES on how to use sriracha sauce.

Written by Kara Newman (alacarte) and edited by yours truly!

You should have seen the photos. They were beautiful. Our photographer put the sriracha in a dipping bowl and arranged chilis around in a circle so they looked like rays of the sun. Then we had recipe photos and a close-up of the bottle and some garlic and chili.

Liz Johnson

Professional:

Food Editor, The Journal News and LoHud.com

Westchester, Rockland and Putnam: The Lower Hudson Valley.

Small Bites, a LoHud culinary blog

Personal:

Sour Cherry Farm.

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though a fine state (even if its landmarks are falling apart), Vermont certainly runs a distant second to Rhode Island in sriracha consumption, what with there being lots of Southeast Asians, Johnson and Wales folks, university students, and just plain obsessives (like yours truly) spraying it yon and hither.

touche. i claim no allegiance to Vermont anymore, so i will defer to your Rhode Islander experience.

... such a small state, and so much hot sauce. 'tis miraculous.

it'd be kinda funny to get ahold of the shipping records of sriracha-making companies... see who's really pulling their weight. somehow i'm guessing that south dakota won't be on top (with apologies to those who might be afflicted with residence in that particular state).

-j.

[edit: to add insult to injury, i seem to have misspelt "Dakota". sorry. really, it's a very pretty place]

Edited by Bissey (log)

Will cook for food.

jasonbissey@yahoo.com

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I'd hazard a wager that, though a fine state (even if its landmarks are falling apart), Vermont...

I believe what you refer to in your parenthetical phrase happened in next-door New Hampshire.

It's still on NH license plates, though.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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I am sick of sweet thingy sauces with MSG in it all Asian spicy sauces seem to have plenty of MSG and sugar to hook you on and on this side of the world we seem to get the lot unless it is home made of course.

If I had to go for the good old hot sauces I rather have an earthy ones.

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OK, this posting, as well as others compelled me to try Sriracha again.

I still don"t like it..

It's too sweet, not hot enough, too fake.

Anything else, please!

"Anybody can make you enjoy the first bite of a dish, but only a real chef can make you enjoy the last.”

Francois Minot

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The first time I tried it on plain canned tuna fish, I thought it wasn't very good, but as it turns out I simply wasn't using enough of it. 

I find that this sriracha principle applies with all foodstuffs: tortilla chips, pork chops, raisin bran, flan, s'mores....

...and cottage cheese, which I usually douse with Frank's Red Hot Sauce.

Not every hot sauce goes well with cottage cheese. Tabasco's vinegary taste clashes with it, for instance. Trappey's Red Devil is a bit too weak. Tapatío goes surprisingly well with it. Using Dave's Insanity Sauce on cottage cheese is, well, insane.

But sriracha? The more you use, the better it is on cottage cheese.

As for piazzola's comment: Check the ingredients list. Sriracha sauce uses no MSG. You may not find the combination of sweetness and a little sass to your liking, but don't blame that Chinese-food staple as a culprit.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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  • 3 years later...

Went into an Asian grocery the other day looking for some fish. The fish was less than fresh but in looking around I found some hoisin and sriracha.

The sriracha is some fabulous stuff. I can't believe that I haven't tried it before.

Does anyone have a recipe that uses it?

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I, too, love sriracha. It goes on just about anything Vietnamese.

I also have a spicy peanut sauce that I serve with chicken that uses it. I've used it at parties before with chicken strips that were skewered and baked.

It is essentially:

* smooth peanut butter

* peanut oil to thin out the peanut butter

* sriracha

* ginger

* sesame oil

* soy sauce

* rice wine vinegar

* lemon juice

* salt

There is no real recipe, just add things to taste. Be careful with the sesame oil as that is a very strong flavor. A little bit goes a long way.

Flickr: Link

Instagram: Link

Twitter: Link

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I use it...um...everywhere.

Anywhere that ketchup might taste good...sriracha. Anywhere where hot sauce might taste good...sriracha. Anywhere where hot pepper flakes, or chili paste, or anything with heat might taste good...sriracha.

Sweet, hot, garlicky. It's my favorite condiment.

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We go through it like water at my house. It goes on pizza, tacos, in sushi maki rolls, on soba noodles, soups, on baked fish, on steamed rice...you get the picture.

My husband is the one who tried putting it on tacos for the first time. He said it was terrific. I think Fat Guy was the person on eGullet who suggested using it on pizza.

Oh, and it great on all kinds of Chinese food.

Edited by shellfishfiend (log)

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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