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LindyCat

Merits of barware

59 posts in this topic

What do you like in your barware? Do you like your glasses of thick sturdy glass, or do you prefer a thin glass, perhaps crystal?

Any feelings on zany stems?

Colors?

The merits of mixing in metal vs glass?

Just a curiosity poll. :)

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I'm very particular about cocktail glasses in particular. Particularly. :blink:

I have a martini set from almost 20 years ago which included (pre-breakage) 6 cocktail glasses, pitcher, and stirrer. I gotta tell you, the thin, polished lip of these glasses really help a cocktail sing in a way that the thick, rounded lips of most standard issue barware never can. Sadly, though, they're that more more prone to chipping, but c'est la vie, as they c'est.

The size of them is also ideal -- not the 12 oz. monstrosities that have become the norm, but a more human 8 oz. size (that still looks reasonably well-filled with a 4 oz. drink).

No frills otherwise, no zany polka dots or rainbow-hued stems, yadda yadda. The fun is in the contents, IMHO.

My cents.

Christopher

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For speed, nothing can beat the regular old Boston shaker used with a hawthorne or julep strainer. For home, use, however, I prefer to use something from my modest collection of inherited and acqired vintage shakers/pitchers.

I've heard people assert that metal shakers make for a colder drink, usually citing the fact that metal is a much better thermal conductor than glass. While it is true that metal is a better thermal conductor than glass, this should actually make a metal shaker worse, not better, at chilling the drink -- as it more readily conducts heat from the surrounding environment (your hands, for example) into its contents. If this is, in fact, true -- and I won't believe it until I do the experiments myself -- it likely has something to do with glass shakers having a greater thermal capacity compared to metal shakers. This being the case, a pre-chilled glass shaker should actually perform best.

In terms of glasses, I like the old ones better as well. Or, failing that, older style glasses. I like them around 5 - 6 ounces, sized to hold a drink at around 3-4 ounces. Lately I've been influenced away from the standard "V" glass and have grown fond of cocktail glasses with more of a "globe" or "coupe" shape.

Drinking out of a good glass makes a big difference, and can really influence the mood of the cocktail. Splificator's "Tombstone" cocktail, a fine drink with an "old fashioned" feel is served in a glass shape that I really like at Flatiron Lounge.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Every spirit has a shape of glass that shows off it's best characture. What is rum's??

Ken

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Good Question

I Love the way it Looks in the Bottle. :smile:


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Good Question

I Love the way it Looks in the Bottle.  :smile:

Absolutely! But it really kills the nose.

For me (so far)

Beer - 20 ounce Pilsner glass Second - 6 ounce wine glass

Bourbon - Schott Zweisel Cask Aged Spirits glass Second - 10 ounce curve walled rocks glass

Wine - 14 ounce wine glass Second - 6 ounce wine glass

Tequila - 4 ounce snifter Second - 4 ounce Reidel tulip glass

Cognac - 4 ounce Reidel tulip glass Second - 6 ounce snifter

so far for rum (and I'm talking Pyrat XO straight up here)

4 ounce snifter (really brings out the nose) Second - 6 ounce wine glass (more places have these and it also does a nice job showing off the nose). Both glasses present the rum well to the palate. I think the shape of the wine glass may present it better (to me, but I have a LARGE mouth :)

Anyone else?? Anyone have something I haven't named here??

Ken

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I like a glass that doens't concentrate the aroma. Good rums have plenty of aroma and by holding the glass at about 45degrees, and moving your nose from the top edge to the bottom edge you can pick out some of the aromas in complex rums.

If you're just drinking mixed drinks it doesn't matter.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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I have enjoyed sipping Ron Facapa Centenario 23 Years out of an "open" glass which does not concentrate the aromas, as Ed described. I never thought I would drink any brown liquor straight. It is wonderful stuff.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Every spirit has a shape of glass that shows off it's best characture. What is rum's??

Ken

Invariably whichever one is most expensive. :biggrin:

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Jamie, the link doesn't work on this .. please repost before I go into cardiac arrest from anticipation at what the link was going to show ...


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Every so often you can find Pyrat XO in a gift box that comes with a pair of frosted glasses that say "Pyrat Rum" on them. They seem sort of fitting. :smile:

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Would the Glencairn Glass or Single Malt glass be conducive to enjoying premium and higher grade rum?

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Rum seems a little "hotter" in the glass, if not at actual proof level than single malt or bourbon, so I'd be cautious about any glass that concentrated those nose-hair-singing alcohol vapors. I think a smaller wine glass might be the best option, or perhaps a straight sided rocks glass. :shrug:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Call me a heretic, but I use a brandy sniffer type glass....however I do cut the rum with a small amount of water .

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I like to add a 'few' drops of water to straight rums bottled at over 38 % alcohol. Small wine glasses with wide mouths and short sides work well, but taller glasses concentrate too much of the alcohol and other aromas in the spirit.

I have yet to find that rum tastes better in an expensive glass, though glass ware does have an impact on the flavor. To me, glassware is like spirits, paying more money doesn't necessarily mean a better spirit.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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Ed,

Is Ron Zacapa ever going to hit shelves in Canada (Ontario)???


"He who does not mind his belly, will hardly mind anything else."

- Samuel Johnson

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Sounds to me like he wants his Ron Zacapa so he can go out and buy some appropriate barware. :raz:

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Sounds to me like he wants his Ron Zacapa so he can go out and buy some appropriate barware. :raz:

Thank you Luna! :laugh:


"He who does not mind his belly, will hardly mind anything else."

- Samuel Johnson

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Rum seems a little "hotter" in the glass, if not at actual proof level than single malt or bourbon, so I'd be cautious about any glass that concentrated those nose-hair-singing alcohol vapors.  I think a smaller wine glass might be the best option, or perhaps a straight sided rocks glass. :shrug:

The first scotch I had in the Glencairn glass was a blended Gordon's (which was the complimentary whisky the Heritage Centre gave to the visitors....a less expensive whisky). Notably hot especially to my nose. I paid extra for a 4-whisky tasting after the tour (not as cheap as Gordon's but not as expensive as the Limited Edition). Warm but not hot. I got 2 bottles of Premium-equivalent Single Malt whisky (and 2 bottles of Limited Edition blended Irish Whiskey during my layover in Dublin). Those compared to the same grade of rum I can't tell any difference regarding hotness in the Glencairn. (Maybe that is because the Gordon's singed my nose hair, lol)

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Here are three that Riedel offer depending on your price point.

winesearch_ouverture_spirits_408_19.jpg

From the Riedel Overture line, Item # 408/19

winesearch_vinum_cognac_hennessy_416_71.jpg

From the Riedel Vinum line, Item # 416/71

winesearch_sommeliers_cognac_4400_71.jpg

From the Riedel Sommeliers line, Item # 4400/71

They're the same glasses that they recommend for cognac.

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:biggrin: For me, I always taste a new rum with about 2 ounces in the bottom of an 8 oz. snifter. Want to get the full aroma before the taste.

Afterwards, a tall 12 oz chimney full of ice, 2 oz rum, and fill with tonic. Brings out a lot of softened characteristics and adds a little sweetness.

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Anyone have recommendations on particular suppliers for quality bartending tools and supplies?

I find most of the fancy cooking stores and liquor stores have pretty poor selections. You're lucky to find a boston shaker.

Specifically, I need to find some decent pourers for my drippy bottles, so I can finish these damn layered Angel's Cocktails in the Savoy without wasting too much more difficult to find liqueur.

I also chipped the top glass to my boston shaker and would like to find some cheap tempered pint glasses (or maybe a stainless cheater tin).

Stores open to the public in the San Francisco area would be ideal; but, online is OK, too.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I also chipped the top glass to my boston shaker and would like to find some cheap tempered pint glasses (or maybe a stainless cheater tin).

I've picked up the habit of using metal on metal boston shakers from Pegu but even those can crack.

gallery_26869_3562_13052.jpg

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