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  • 6 months later...
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I'm gonna bump this. I cooked a whole butt to make pork tamales (for a Dia de los Muertos celebration) and was considering also serving tacos al pastor (I'm already doing tacos lengua so the fixins are there already, and I'll have plenty of leftover pork). My pork tamales are being made half with an orange-red mole and half with a "chile colorado" type sauce, Texas-style with lots of meat.

I did a Google search and virtually all the recipes I saw for tacos al pastor seemed to be copying the same recipe (from this webpage) which seems to be something different from what I have eaten.

Surely someone knows how to make tacos al pastor as served in many American taquerias?

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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i'm not sure what the spicing mixture is, but all of the best tacos al pastor in southern california are cooked vertical roasters and then shaved off to order, like schwarma or gyro meat.

There's a name for these guys (I think they're pretty much exclusively guys). My sister, who lived in Mexico for a few years, told me that they actually have a job that is seen as part of a tradition, and is accorded respect. It's not a "would you like fries with that" type of thing at all, but something that requires training and paying your dues, at least in Mexico. I'm not surprised; good tacos al pastor is one of my favorite things to eat on the whole planet.

Cheers,

Geoff Ruby

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  • 2 months later...

There is a spectacular recipe on page 255 of Jim Peyton's "New Cooking From Old Mexico". I'm not going to print the recipe here, though.

:>)

cause Jim is a hero of mine whose cookbooks are some of the best on the planet, though he isn't super well known and I'd like to see some business go his way.

Here's hoping you will check his books out on Amazon and hopefully buy one or two. I can vouch for "New Cooking" and "El Norte The Cuisine of Northern Mexico".

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Russ, Tacos al pastor in Mexico are gyros or shwarma. They were introduced by the very influential Lebanese community tha's been here since the early twentieth century (think Salma Hayek, for example). Of course they have been adapted to Mexican circumstances. They are not home cooking so recipes are hard to come by. I suspect some vendor(s) supplies many of the al pastor places. I'll try and ask.

I was very surprised to find when I looked for tacos al pastor in Austin, Texas that they were something quite different.

Rachel

Rachel Caroline Laudan

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