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The Coastal Gardening Topic


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Zucchinis are now coming out in full force. I made a spray of one part ammonia and ten part water and it seems to work.

Now I want to propagate a blueberry stem I got from a friend but don't know a thing about propagation. I have the fresh stem in a jar of water right now. Do I really need rooting solution to start it off?

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  • 2 weeks later...

http://www.thebuglady.ca/buying.htm

I wanted to put up this website as a source for the copper tape for slugs. I find I have to grow my plants in pots until they are fairly strong, then transplant them so the slugs don't get them. Apparently even old copper pennies in your garden give slugs little shocks.

As for wood bugs, they usually just munch on decaying matter. I've never heard of them being a problem. I have gazillions of them in my garden and they never touch the healthy stuff.

Also for gardening, check out a local blog called Heavy Petal. She's wonderful and has a good gardening blogroll.

I have a nice crop of Cherokee Trail of Tears beans this year. They are a climbing black bean that you can eat green and young or eat them as a pot bean or dry them when they turn purple. I picked up the seeds at Seedy Saturday.

Edited by Zucchini Mama (log)

"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted."

--Mae West

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  • 8 months later...

I have started sprouting seeds for cherry tomatoes, fennel, flaxplant and garlice chive.

I've decided to grow mostly herbs this summer for consumption use.

I want to grow rosemary, lavender, thyme, sage, and oregano. However, there are a few varieties of each and would like some advice as to which variety to grow. I want the variety that is flavorful for most dishes.

I'm also considering wormwood, yarrow and other medicinally useful herbs.

Because of slugs last year, I plan to grow these in raised planters.

Also, I would like to know what other herbs you have grown that are low maintenance and delicious.

Your advice and suggestions are much appreciated

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Also, I would like to know what other herbs you have grown that are low maintenance and delicious.

Your advice and suggestions are much appreciated

Basil, tarragon and parsley can all be added to your list. Basil should wait a month to a month and a half, the others can go in now (or after the weekend - what a crappy spring).

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I have started sprouting seeds for cherry tomatoes, fennel, flaxplant and garlice chive.

I've decided to grow mostly herbs this summer for consumption use.

I want to grow rosemary, lavender, thyme, sage, and oregano.  However, there are a few varieties of each and would like some advice as to which variety to grow.  I want the variety that is flavorful for most dishes.

Your advice and suggestions are much appreciated

Pineapple sage is fun, wasabi, Thai basil, shiso, and summer savory.

"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted."

--Mae West

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Rosemary, Sage and Oregano are pretty hardy, and forgiving of neglect. They are still alive in my planters, even though I am somewhat gardening impaired. My daughter used to tell plant vendors not to sell me anything which actually needed watering. :-(

Lavender is a perennial, and I have some which is still alive after over 10 years in my (lack of) care. Rhubard is pretty hardy as well.

Mint is a hardy perennial; nice for mojitos! Beware, it is an invasive "weed", so planting in pots is definitely recommended.

Karen Dar Woon

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My wife just got the seeds she ordered from the island. I always insist she gets some heirloom tomatoes. This year she's also got a whole whack of lettuce varietals. Fingers crossed.

Paul B

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I have just returned from a weekend of gardening (and I have the blisters to prove it!) I am starting fresh on land that hasn't seen a rake or a hoe ...well, maybe ever! It is the Sunshine Coast so the land consists of rocks and blackberry bushes....and cedar trees and rocks and more blackberry....

I had a dump truck load of top soil delivered last week and now I dont know if I can afford to buy any plants! :laugh:

I haven't actually planted anything yet. :wacko: I am still trying to figure out what to do with the blackberry bushes that are choking the life out of everything on the property. (They've already killed one rather tall alder :sad: ) I am dead against the use of chemicals but every single person I talk to says the same thing - kill it with the strong stuff!

I am looking for alternatives - anything! I will try it.

Is it odd that I am looking for ways to get rid of this mess when there is a big piece of blackberry pie sitting on my kitchen counter right now!

The other day I was at Home Depot and they were selling blackberry bushes......is this some kind of sick joke? Come on over! I will give you all you want for free~!

"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

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I haven't actually planted anything yet. :wacko:  I am still trying to figure out what to do with the blackberry bushes that are choking the life out of everything on the property.  (They've already killed one rather tall alder :sad: )  I am dead against the use of chemicals but every single person I talk to says the same thing - kill it with the strong stuff!

I am looking for alternatives - anything!  I will try it.

The other day I was at Home Depot and they were selling blackberry bushes......is this some kind of sick joke?  Come on over!  I will give you all you want for free~!

Well, find someone on the coast that has a goat. Of course, you'll need to fence them in but it is far and away the best way to control blackberry bushes. In fact, it's really the only way. The only downside is you'd have to live there with the goat while he takes care of the problem.

Where on the coast is the property?

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Where on the coast is the property?

A goat you say? I'll do it! The bears eat the garbage and spread what they dont like across the yard :sad: , the deer eat anything they like in the garden leaving it ravaged, the birds eat all my seeds - what is one more of nature's lovely creatures! :laugh:

I am in Secret Cove. Are you also somewhere on the 101?

"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

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Where on the coast is the property?

A goat you say? I'll do it! The bears eat the garbage and spread what they dont like across the yard :sad: , the deer eat anything they like in the garden leaving it ravaged, the birds eat all my seeds - what is one more of nature's lovely creatures! :laugh:

I am in Secret Cove. Are you also somewhere on the 101?

No, my parents live in Roberts Creek.

more info

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Just bought a large rosemary plant from Donald's Market on Hastings and Nanaimo. They have a few other herbs and vegetables plants throughout the summer. I find the prices much better than some of the gardening stores that I frequent.

I'm looking for Thai basil, either sprouted or in seed form. Anyone know where I can get them without having to place an order? I bought one from an organic store on Main and 19th but it seems to be dying.

Edited by maxmillan (log)
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I have just returned from a weekend of gardening (and I have the blisters to prove it!)  I am starting fresh on land that hasn't seen a rake or a hoe ...well, maybe ever!  It is the Sunshine Coast so the land consists of rocks and blackberry bushes....and cedar trees and rocks and more blackberry....

I had a dump truck load of top soil delivered last week and now I dont know if I can afford to buy any plants! :laugh:

I haven't actually planted anything yet. :wacko:  I am still trying to figure out what to do with the blackberry bushes that are choking the life out of everything on the property.  (They've already killed one rather tall alder :sad: )  I am dead against the use of chemicals but every single person I talk to says the same thing - kill it with the strong stuff!

I am looking for alternatives - anything!  I will try it.

Is it odd that I am looking for ways to get rid of this mess when there is a big piece of blackberry pie sitting on my kitchen counter right now! 

The other day I was at Home Depot and they were selling blackberry bushes......is this some kind of sick joke?  Come on over!  I will give you all you want for free~!

I suspect the blackberry bushes at Home Depot were the thornless variety. We have one, and it's quite different than the wild ones - our berries are larger, firmer and sweeter. And if you've got little kids, the thornless ones are a blessing.

Anybody who believes that the way to a man's heart is through his stomach flunked geography.

~ Robert Byrne

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Just bought a large rosemary plant from Donald's Market on Hastings and Nanaimo.  They have a few other herbs and vegetables plants throughout the summer.  I find the prices much better than some of the gardening stores that I frequent.

I'm looking for Thai basil, either sprouted or in seed form.  Anyone know where I can get them without having to place an order?  I bought one from an organic store on Main and 19th but it seems to be dying.

Sometimes you can find Thai basil plants at the farmer's markets.

"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted."

--Mae West

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  • 3 weeks later...
I bought a Thai basil and Spicy Globe basil.  Are they interchangeable for cooking?  They smell similar, but I read that the Spicy Globe makes good coverage for pathways.  Is the Spicy Globe used for eating?

you can certainly eat spicy globe basil; whether they are interchangeable or not is another matter...if you are thinking of cooking Thai food you will probably have to establish if your plant is holy basil (horapa) which is the purplish one used in curries, etc and I find that it can't be replaced by another type...or Thai basil (krapao) which is just green and doesn't have the aniseed hit...maybe you could interchange that one with spicy globe but not in Thai food....hmmm, have I confused you

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  • 11 months later...

Spinach, chard and red leaf lettuce overwintered surprisingly well in downtown Vancouver, after a "hard harvest" and removal of row covers in December. Seeing all the new leaves, in March, was a wonderful sight! I've started new lettuce and spinach ("Perpetual Harvest") indoors, in pots, and have been able to harvest some lettuce for salads. Hurray for spring!

Karen Dar Woon

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  • 1 month later...

I'm looking for a comprehensible and simple gardening book on container gardening or square feet gardening. I've borrowed a few from the library but there are so many to choose from. I want something that is particular to our climate zone (Vancouver.) I want to grow edibles only.

Reader's Digest has a book called, "Crops in Pots: how to plan, plant, and grow vegetables, fruits and herbs in easy care containers" by Bob Purnell. This book has amazing ideas and photos but I need more detailed info on care (fertilzers, nutrients, etc.)

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  • 1 month later...

This is what you want.

-- Matt.

I'm looking for a comprehensible and simple gardening book on container gardening or square feet gardening.  I've borrowed a few from the library but there are so many to choose from.  I want something that is particular to our climate zone (Vancouver.)  I want to grow edibles only.

Reader's Digest has a book called, "Crops in Pots:  how to plan, plant, and grow vegetables, fruits and herbs in easy care containers" by Bob Purnell.  This book has amazing ideas and photos but I need more detailed info on care (fertilzers, nutrients, etc.)

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The Bountiful Container is quite a good book - maybe more useful for limited spaces than the Square Foot Gardening book (which rather assumes that you are growing conventional quantities of each crop, albeit micromanaging them).

The one thing I disagree with about SFG is the shallow soil depth - unless you are ultra-rigorous about watering twice daily in hot weather. I've had much better success with deep containers, especially hip-high slimline garbage containers for things like squash or tomatoes. Even 18" (45 cm) soil depth seems to be that much more resilient than 12" (30 cm).

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  • 1 month later...

Village Vancouver and Fork in the Road are pleased to offer Learning Parties with Robin Wheeler on a variety of topics related to gardening, urban agriculture, community and sustainability.

Robin is the founder of The Sustainable Living Arts School (http://www.ediblelandscapes.ca/), and the author of Gardening for the Faint of Heart and Food Security for the Faint of Heart. She lives on the Sunshine Coast, and brings a vast wealth of knowledge and experience with her to each workshop.

Robin's workshops are always a real treat. You can expect your knowledge to expand and your soul to be delighted...and sometimes for your hands to get dirty.

Tuesday, Sept 29th

Concepts in Year Round Gardening 9:45-11:45 am

Grandview Woodland (near Nanaimo and 1st)

The Whys and Wherefores of food cycles - why we want them, how to get them. We will plan round the calendar food supplies, both in the larder and stored in the garden.

Introduction to Medicine Making 1:30-4:30 pm

Main St./Little Mountain (near Cambie and King Ed)

There are so many plants that are safe, easy to recognize and locate, and effective. We will learn some recognition techniques, and then how to make teas, poultices, tinctures and infused oils. We'll learn about solvents, supplies and storage.

Apartment and Container Gardening 6:30-8 pm

Potluck @ 5:30 for folks who would like to share a meal together

Downtown (near Davie and Seymour)

How to get more food from your balcony or patio. Space and weight are big problems for apartment dwellers. We will decide how to choose plants, discuss containers, soils, feeding and watering, succession planting and more in this workshop for small spaces.

Wednesday, Sept 30

Seed Saving Primer 9-10:30 am

Kits Point Village (near Cornwall and Arbutus)

co-sponsored by Kits Point neighbourhood Village

Seed saving is the missing link in food security. In our current political climate of seed patenting and ownership, it is increasingly important that a critical mass of a population have a good understanding of seed saving techniques. This will make it possible to create networks for seed abundance and resilience in many communities. This workshop will provide a deeper understanding of seed saving basics as well as provide time to discuss the implications of forming our relationships soon and well.

Your donation includes a copy of The Five Levels of Seed Saving by Terry Klokeid.

Shapes in Sharing 10:45-11:45 am

Kits Point Village (near Cornwall and Arbutus)

co-sponsored by Kits Point neighbourhood Village

Ideas for sharing land, food, space and time with a workshop component. We'll do a study of our own assets and shortfalls and figure out how to equalize these on both a large and small scale.

Intensive Urban Microfarming 1:30-4:30 pm

Potluck @12:30 for folks who would like to share a meal together

Cedar Cottage (near Victoria Dr., south of Trout Lake/John Hendry Park)

For folks who are ready to refine and to deepen their knowledge of urban microfarming, Robin invites you to participate in a 3 hour gathering that will examine as many of the following topics as time allows:

· Increasing backyard food production

· Succession planting

· Shade growing

· Extending the growing season through your choice of

plants, Water Wisdom, Plant Calendar Mapping and

Microclimating.

Apartment and Container Gardening 7-8:30 pm

Potluck @ 6 for folks who would like to share a meal together

Lower Lonsdale, North Vancouver (near Lonsdale & 1st & Lonsdale Quay)

How to get more food from your balcony or patio. Space and weight are big problems for apartment dwellers. We will decide how to choose plants, discuss containers, soils, feeding and watering, succession planting and more, in this workshop for small spaces.

All workshops are offered on a pay what you can basis. A one hour workshop usually costs around $10 to $15; a 1 1/2 hour workshop around $15 to $20; a two hour workshop around $25 to $30, a 2 1/2 hour workshop around $30 to $35. and a three hour workshop around $40. Our contributions to these workshops make it possible for teachers like Robin to expand and to deepen the scope of the important educational and social change work that they are involved in, particularly in these uncertain times.

Enrolment is limited to 20 people for each workshop. (15 for Apartment workshops.)

To register:(or to find out more about hosting a future workshop), please contact Ross at rmoster@flash.net.

*********

Village Vancouver's food networking workshops are community based gatherings which help participants connect with others who share interests around food and sustainability on a neighbourhood level. Other network presenters include Spring Gillard (Diary of a Compost Hotline Operator) and Heather Havens (agricultural and animal scientist, Backyard Chickens 101).

Karen Dar Woon

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So with it already being the end of September and the weather is cooling suddenly, am I too late to get anything started on my apartment balconies? I have a small one on the south side of my apartment, sun blocked from the eat due to a wall, and north due to the building, but aside from the it gets a fair bit of sun. Also have another larger one on the west side which doesn't get as much sun, but atleast a few hours a day...

Too late, or can I get anything going?

Shane

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