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Kashmiri (pink) chai recipe?


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I have had this chai in Pakistani restaurants. It is a beautiful dusty pink color, and is very rich, with dried fruit and nuts stewed in milk. It is very different from the usual spice chai. I have heard that it is brewed (or almost stewed) over a long period, up to 24 hours. I would appreciate a recipe that can be made in a home kitchen that lacks specialized equipment. I do have a Le Creuset saucepan that I suspect will be perfect.

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I have heard that it is brewed (or almost stewed) over a long period, up to 24 hours.

I don't know how specialized a slow cooker would be, or if you have access to one but sounds ideal for something that has to stew for a lengthy period of time.

Sorry, have no help in your quest for the recipe... But my curiosity has been aroused.. will follow this thread..

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if you have a samovar,you'll be off to a good start.kehwa/kahwa.

the pink colour comes from the addition of a little baking soda.

I was just about to mention the baking soda thing....I have a recipe for this in an Aghani cookbook. Let me go take a look at it and I will post again soon....

Edward

Edward Hamann

Cooking Teacher

Indian Cooking

edhamann@hotmail.com

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Thanks everyone.

I do have a samovar, and a slow cooker. I am new to this site and intimidated by all the professionals here, so I was wary of the sophisticated equipment that might be needed.

The tea I tried had chopped apricots, golden raisins, pistachios, and almonds. It qualified as a full dessert rather than just tea.

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  • 2 weeks later...
if you have a samovar,you'll be off to a good start.kehwa/kahwa.

the pink colour comes from the addition of a little baking soda.

in kashmir, scheer chai is usually served with the small round crisp flatbread known as katlam to dip into the chai.

fwiw. the saffron is optional in kahva. I've been given kahva numerous times by kashmiris both in kashmir and elsewhere and the saffron is usually saved for very special occasions. btw, you leave the leaves in to chew with the almonds (which should be broken up but not powdered), cardamom, etc.

Edited by zimbida (log)
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  • 2 years later...

Just a note on the various types of Kashmiri tea: as I understand it (and I lived in Srinagar for quite some time), there are several:

kahwa: sometimes pronounced kehwah. This is the one that sometimes includes saffron. It is usually translucent, brewed with green tea leaves (although the more saffron you use, the less tea one puts in). Orange to reddish orange in color. Can include dried fruits, and usually includes almonds and green cardamom. I heard what is probably an apocryphal story about it having to include twelve things, based on what is surely a faulty persian etymology.

nun chai: nun means salt, and this is the famous salty tea of kashmir. It's pink, because the green tea leaves react with a pinch of baking powder. It's served, not surprisingly, with salt rather than sugar (which may sound gross, but is really tasty and healthy in high altitudes). In Rawalpindi, near Islamabad, in Pakistan, they sometimes make a similar brew, but use sugar. That is, perhaps not surprisingly, called Pindi chai (although I had it served to me a week ago in NYC as Kashmiri chai by someone from Islamabad... who said that more people here have heard of Kashmiri chai, so he uses that name). Anyway, it can contain almonds, no saffron, and many Kashmiris like to crumble or dip local bread into it and eat that for breakfast.

More than you probably wanted to know, I am sure.

best,

cassady

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