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snowangel

Dry rub and smoked meat

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I smoke pork shoulders fairly often, and never do a dry rub. My kids love the pure smoky flavor.

Nor do I use a rub when I'm smoking poultry.

So, I'm smoking a brisket on Sunday. The thing is huge. Over 18 lbs (this thing weighs more than the birth weights of all three of my kids -- combined) and just over 20" long, so I'm going to have to cut it in half to get it on the kettle.

I'm debating a dry rub, on the whole, or half of it.

What are your thoughts on dry rubs for meat to be smoked?


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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snowangel, I don't smoke meat, but I do make Maggie's 24 hour pork butt. I use a dry rub on that--a cup of brown sugar, several tablespoons of green chile powder, a tablespoon of cumin. It makes a lightly sweet, hot, caramelized crust that folks fight over. I think adding a layer of smoke would just take it right over the top!

(Dang, I gotta make one of those soon.)


sparrowgrass

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I was researching smoking at home last week. I was uncertain about smoking the chicken after applying the jerk rub and it absolutely can be done. How it tastes, I don't know because I have not tried it.

CM

Off Topic: I was hoping to smoke it until almost done and then apply a swwet barbecue sauce(to offset the jerk heat) and then stick it under the broiler to finish cooking and to crisp.

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My brother got a smoker for Christmas and he put rubs on the pork ribs and chickens that he has smoked. They were delicious. I didn't consider it overkill.

As long as you're cutting the brisket in half, you could experiment and rub one half but not the other. Drink some beer :wink: and take pics to post back here.


 

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Tim Oliver

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My brother got a smoker for Christmas and he put rubs on the pork ribs and chickens that he has smoked.  They were delicious.  I didn't consider it overkill. 

As long as you're cutting the brisket in half, you could experiment and rub one half but not the other.  Drink some beer  :wink:  and take pics to post back here.

I think I'll do rub in half of it and leave the other half naked. Yes, I'll drink some beer, but not when I start smoking (Sunday morning). Or, is beer the breakfast of smokers?


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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I always use a rub on brisket. I don't always use a rub on pork. I have no idea why.

I enourage you to cut the beast in half. That is what I do to fit a whole monster in the WSM. Also, you will find that the flat portion of the brisket will need to come off sooner. I only have one probe thermometer so I put that in the flat to start. Do not be tempted to take it off too soon. That is the most common mistake. You will get a pretty long temperature stall at about 170 F. I find that a typical brisket gets really yummy when it gets past the stall and intrepidly climbs to 190-200. Then I switch the thermometer to the point and wait until it is done.

Buy lots of beer. You are looking at at least 12 hours or more at the ideal temp of 225 F at the grate. I have had big ones take 16 hours, and that in the bullet where I don't have to take the lid off to tend the fire. Put a pan of water under it. When I was using the kettle, I used those disposable foil pans. The water is there to help maintain a stable temperature, not for moisture.

This discussion is for the bullet but can certainly be adapted to the kettle.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I got my Brickman pan for my new smokey mountain for more water capacity and it was bent up. Guess I need Hi-temp paint so it won't rust. Smokin soon. :biggrin:


Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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:biggrin: Beer is for breakfast.. and rub the whole thing down

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Buy lots of beer. You are looking at at least 12 hours or more at the ideal temp of 225 F at the grate. I have had big ones take 16 hours, and that in the bullet where I don't have to take the lid off to tend the fire. Put a pan of water under it. When I was using the kettle, I used those disposable foil pans. The water is there to help maintain a stable temperature, not for moisture.

This discussion is for the bullet but can certainly be adapted to the kettle.

So, I'm used to the Kettle. Know about the disposable pans. Can control temp.

But, I'm thinking dinner at 6:30 pm on Sunday night. Start drinking beer at 6:30 am Sunday morning? I'd better rethink this whole thing. Smoke on Saturday. So, how do I reheat the damed stuff so I get some that nice crispy stuff? Or, do I put Paul in charge on Sunday afternoon and go and take a nap and sleep it off?

Rub, it will be, on half of the beast. So, let's talk rubs. ANy fav's out there? I was thinking of the one Klink mentioned in his Smoking Meat At Home class on ECI.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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:biggrin: Beer is for breakfast.. and rub the whole thing down

Excuse me, beer is not just for breakfast anymore. :biggrin::laugh:


Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Klink's rub looks mighty tasty. What does sumac taste like? I have never used it, or been able to find it for that matter.

I like to use those big 2 gallon zipper bags to rub the rub in on the meat. If I think about it, I put the rub on the night before.

Winesonoma . . . I have had trouble with the Brinkman pan, too. :biggrin: I picked one up at my local sporting goods store and they had it mismarked. I ended up with the other pan and it doesn't fit. By the time I figured that out, I had long since lost the receipt so I have to start over for this year.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I would definately use a rub. I also spritz with a mix of red hot, apple juice and maple syrup in a spray bottle every hour or so. I think you are running little tight on your cooking time if you are going to smoke at 200 degrees given the size of the meat, even if it is cut in half.


**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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Klink's rub looks mighty tasty. What does sumac taste like? I have never used it, or been able to find it for that matter.

I like to use those big 2 gallon zipper bags to rub the rub in on the meat. If I think about it, I put the rub on the night before.

Winesonoma . . . I have had trouble with the Brinkman pan, too.  :biggrin: I picked one up at my local sporting goods store and they had it mismarked. I ended up with the other pan and it doesn't fit. By the time I figured that out, I had long since lost the receipt so I have to start over for this year.

It fits fine, they played basketball with the box so the porcelain is chipped since it's a flimsy piece of Junk, But for $15 it's not going back. :biggrin:


Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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There's no way even half of this beast is going to fit into a 2 gallon. It is a monster.

Diana and my dad stopped at a middle eastern market they other day. On my list was sumac. I haven't opened up the package to sample it, but I don't have a clue about it either. But, if Klink suggested it, so be it. I had his brisket, served up by him. None the less, the smallest package they had was 1 lb.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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snowangel, sumac is awesome. Slightly sour. Here is a great recipe with which you can use up the rest: link

I like to use a rub on smoked ribs. I make mine with coffee, sort of an adaptation of a raichlin (sp?) recipe. Actually, I marinate with the rub first, then brush on BBQ sauce near the end. In the sauce I use pomegranate molasses instead of regular, just cause I happen to always have it around. You could do both for a certain intriguing middle eastern something :smile:


Edited by Behemoth (log)

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I'm pretty sure Penzey's carries sumac. I have some, although I've never used it, and Penzey's is where I get nearly all my spices, so it probably came from there. I'll check when I get home.


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