• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Chris Amirault

Pad Thai--Cook-Off 6

122 posts in this topic

Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.

For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?

In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:

The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.

A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.

For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.

Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!

I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I've just reserved every Thai cook book our library system has to offer. And, asked my mother to reserve every one my library system doesn't have that her's has.

I hope someone else will chime in on internet sources. I can get fresh rice noodles and everything else within a bike ride (a long bike ride, mind you) from my house). I happen to have everything I need, with the exception of the fresh stuff, at my house at the present time.

BTW, the "preserved radish" referred to in Mamster's recipe is sold here in plastic bag packages as "salted radish." I'll take some pictures of ingredients that I can easily find in the next couple of days.

My family loves pad thai. I just have a lot of trouble with the rice noodles. They tend to be either stiff or mush. I need help!


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snowangel,

I use dried rice noodles for Pad Thai and soak them for a couple of hours in cold water before cooking. The end result is perfect.

Elie


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Finally, thanks to the internet, remember that you're never too late for an eGullet cook-off. While all have a specific starting time, none have a end time, and there are many of us eager to see what you will do with the cook-off recipes. So don't hesitate to contribute if you're finding this thread weeks or months after its start: your posting your own ideas, questions, or results can bump activity back up on this thread in no time!

I'm counting on this. I still really want to try the fried chicken & steamed pork buns...

For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai.

I feel like I've finally got the hang of that one, but I might try making my own noodles this time. That would be fun, especially since I have, like, 10 lbs of rice flour taking up way too much space in my pantry. (Korean pine needle rice cake project that I still haven't gotten around to...but at least I finally located my pine needles! :rolleyes: )

Snowangel, I think the thing with the noodles is that they really seem to differ from brand to brand. After a couple of "too mushy" tries I now err on the side of slightly too stiff when soaking-- then I pull off pieces and try them as I'm cooking. If they are still too stiff, I put in a little more sauce and stir fry them longer until they are just al-dente. (All the "fresh" ingredients get added at the end so you can't really overcook the dish.)

Oh, and despite what David Thompson says, I got impatient once and soaked the noodles for 15 minutes in warm water. Worked fine.


Edited by Behemoth (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Finally, thanks to the internet, remember that you're never too late for an eGullet cook-off. While all have a specific starting time, none have a end time, and there are many of us eager to see what you will do with the cook-off recipes. So don't hesitate to contribute if you're finding this thread weeks or months after its start: your posting your own ideas, questions, or results can bump activity back up on this thread in no time!

I'm counting on this. I still really want to try the fried chicken & steamed pork buns...

Absolutely! There are many among us who will be very happy to see your results!

For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai.

I feel like I've finally got the hang of that one, but I might try making my own noodles this time. That would be fun, especially since I have, like, 10 lbs of rice flour taking up way too much space in my pantry.

Excellent! Pictures, please!

Snowangel, I think the thing with the noodles is that they really seem to differ from brand to brand. After a couple of "too mushy" tries I now err on the side of slightly too stiff  when soaking-- then I pull off pieces and try them as I'm cooking. If they are still too stiff, I put in a little more sauce and stir fry them longer until they are just al-dente. (All the "fresh" ingredients get added at the end so you can't really overcook the dish.)

Good tips! Can you give us some brand recommendations?


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello ChrisAmirault,

Ohhhh, I am excited to try this. I love Thai food, and Pad Thai is a favorite.

I have tried it before, and got the noodles cooked satisfactorily, but my problem is with the sauce. I love the flavorful, slightly sweet, slightly spicy sauce in the restaurants, but mine turned out (Time 1) so spicy I couldn't eat it, and (Time 2) muddy and icky in appearance and flavor. I'm going to look for a good recipe from among your suggestions. Thank you!

Catherine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Good tips! Can you give us some brand recommendations?

:laugh:

I live in central illinois. I take what I can find! :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess another of my problems with the noodles is that they are all broken up by the time the dish is done. They aren't the long, silky looking strands you see in the cookbooks, or that I ate lo those many years ago in Bangkok.

I've also perused Mamster's recipe, as well as those in the Thai/SE Asian cookbooks I own (3 total) and realize that there is some difference in which the order of ingredients are added to the pan. As well, there seems to be some difference on whether the sauce is just tamarind and nam pla, just rice vinegar and nam pla or a combination of all three.

And, as I recall from the almost 10 years I lived in Thailand, "authentic" pad thai is in the eye of the beholder. They were all slightly different. Slightly different taste, slightly diferent widths of noodles, and had I paid more attention than a teenage girl would while the cook was cooking, I have no doubt I would have noted different cooking techiniques with every different dish.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess another of my problems with the noodles is that they are all broken up by the time the dish is done.  They aren't the long, silky looking strands you see in the cookbooks, or that I ate lo those many years ago in Bangkok.

Sounds like the noodles are either oversoaked, or overhandled in the mixing.

Count me in the cook-off...but I'll only be doing this on April 10. :smile:


TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the recipe I use for pad thai. I make it at work sometimes--I made it the week I participated in the Foodblog actually.

Pad Thai

1 pound pad thai noodles

2 eggs

Peanut oil

1 tsp chopped garlic

1 tbsp chopped onion

3-4 tbsp vinegar

1 tbsp sugar

1 tbsp soy sauce

1 pound shrimp

Chicken stock

1 tsp pickled sweet radish

1 tbsp fried tofu

Sweet paprika

Cayenne

Sea salt and white pepper

1 cup bean sprouts

2 tbsp ground toasted peanuts plus extra for garnish

1 cup scallions and garlic chives

1 tbsp nam pla

Jalapenos

Lime slices

Soak noodles in water for at least 30 minutes. Beat eggs. Heat pan with oil. Add eggs. Cook without moving until half done and then move to pan side. Add onion and garlic. Add vinegar, sugar and soy sauce. Add shrimp. Add noodles. Add stock if needed and toss. Add radish, tofu, paprika, cayenne, pepper, and salt. Toss. Add half of sprouts. Toss. Add peanuts and most of scallions and chives. Add fish sauce. Toss and remove from heat. Plate with shrimp and scallions on top. Garnish with jalapenos, raw bean sprouts, lime slice, peanuts, and spring onions.

I learned this recipe at L'academie from a Thai chef. Comes out great every time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
. . . . .

I've also perused Mamster's recipe, as well as those in the Thai/SE Asian cookbooks I own (3 total) and realize that there is some difference in which the order of ingredients are added to the pan.  As well, there seems to be some difference on whether the sauce is just tamarind and nam pla, just rice vinegar and nam pla  or a combination of all three.

And, as I recall from the almost 10 years I lived in Thailand,  "authentic" pad thai is in the eye of the beholder.  They were all slightly different.  Slightly different taste, slightly diferent widths of noodles, and had I paid more attention than a teenage girl would while the cook was cooking, I have no doubt I would have noted different cooking techiniques with every different dish.

Heh heh . . . this sounds sorta like gumbo. Everybody makes it differently. Everybody uses different ingredients. Everybody has a trick up their sleeve. And with all of that . . . Everybody knows what it is. And, though pad thai is pad thai in a way, it is probably never really the same.

And, can we say that the ingredients are somewhat . . . um . . . flexible? Is this one of those dishes where, beyond the basics (sort of like gumbo) that the intent is to use what you have? I am just trying to wrap my head around the character of the dish. I have eaten it at restaurants and tried it a couple of times long ago but I never really thought about it a lot. (Mine wasn't that great. I think I didn't know what I was doing with the noodles.)

Perfect for a cook-off.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And, can we say that the ingredients are somewhat . . . um . . . flexible? Is this one of those dishes where, beyond the basics (sort of like gumbo) that the intent is to use what you have? I am just trying to wrap my head around the character of the dish. I have eaten it at restaurants and tried it a couple of times long ago but I never really thought about it a lot. (Mine wasn't that great. I think I didn't know what I was doing with the noodles.)

Perfect for a cook-off.

I agree. I have at least six different pad thai recipes in my cookbooks and each one is very different. I think that that is part of the interest here, determining what effects different ingredients have, and at what times. I also think -- and Malawry's recipe bears this out -- that we'll find versions that don't have too many ingredients that will be hard for folks without good Asian stores to find.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Rochelle! That is a good-looking recipe. And everyone has already given some good input. I'm loving this!

Susan, I hope you don't mind if this other Susan jumps in with a photo, too. I wasn't sure what I was looking for when I first started on my sweetened salted radish search, and I ended up with both of these:

gallery_13038_837_572254.jpg

One says sweet salted turnip and the other says preserved radish (sweet). Hopefully this will give those of you unfamiliar a visual idea of what to look for. I had also been looking for the little dried shrimps for quite a while and recently found them.

Kasma Loha-unchit calls for dried shrimp as well as fresh in her Pad Thai recipe.

I have a good source for rice noodles. It's in a town 30 miles from here, but it's worth the drive. However, I have ordered stuff, including Jasmine rice and sticky rice, from both Temple of Thai and ImportFood.com on more than one occasion, and I've been very pleased with the quality and the prices. I imagine that they would be reliable sources of rice noodles.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been meaning to learn how to make Pad Thai for-just-ever, so thanks for the impetus!

I skimmed through chrisamirault's links above & have two quick questions:

1) A couple of posts in there implied that meat/chicken pad thai is not authentic. I'm not able to eat fish or seafood, so I was initially thinking about doing a carnivore's Pad Thai, but would it be better just to go vegetarian? If meat is authentic, what would be the most appropriate?

2) can anyone confirm (the original poster wasn't certain) that vegetarian fish sauce is called Nuoc Mam Chay?

Thanks, this will be fun!

E


Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've bought a couple different salted radishes, and they all tasted odd, if anyone has a good brand recommendation i'd like to hear it

thanks

jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, in one of the Thai restaurants I go to they have shrimp Pad Thai, pork Pad Thai, chicken Pad Thai, vegetarian Pad That, etc. listed on the menu. Go for whatever appeals to you. I'm glad you got the impetus! I'm not sure about the name of vegetarian fish sauce, but my bet is that somebody here will. :smile:

While I was out burning off calories in my walk/run today, naturally I was thinking about food... where for my colleague and me to go for our dinner meeting tonight, and what thickness of rice noodles to use in this cook-off!! I understand this is a matter of personal taste/preference, as well. What do you all prefer, and why?


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is exciting. I have a couple of questions, too. What EXACTLY is a cook-off? Do you make the dish, photograph it, review it, and post the results? I am new to this site and love it already.

Also, where on the site can I go to read about the basics (something tells me I should already know what a cook-off is).

Thank you.

Catherine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is exciting.  I have a couple of questions, too.  What EXACTLY is a cook-off?  Do you make the dish, photograph it, review it, and post the results?  I am new to this site and love it already.

Also, where on the site can I go to read about the basics (something tells me I should already know what a cook-off is). 

Thank you.

Catherine

Welcome, Catherine! If you click on the blue text in the intial post here, you will go to the previous five cook-offs. They should explain themselves quite well!


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After making it many more times, I've come to the conclusion that the phad thai recipe I posted has too much tamarind. I've been playing around with the proportions but haven't come up with something I like much better yet. So I'm in, too.

Also, Iris is really into phad thai lately. The spicier the better.

Isn't David Thompson's recipe the one that calls for "a handful of rice noodles"? What a tease.


Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geez, Mamster I dunno... I thought the 3/4cup Tamarind water was dead-on. I did notice that when I heated up the Tpaste in water, the more time on the heat wrings out more flavour, so depending on how dense the tamarind "water" is, will affect the pungency of the sauce. Your recipe is the only one I've made that comes close to our local Thai Take out so it works for me. Sheesh, I'm in! :rolleyes:


"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...what thickness of rice noodles to use in this cook-off!!  I understand this is a matter of personal taste/preference, as well.  What do you all prefer, and why?

I did a Google Image search for Pad Thai and the noodles that appeared range from glass noodles to fettucine-like noodles. I prefer noodles about this size.

Don't look at that page unless you've had something to eat. :laugh:


“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hmmmm....the husband is deathly allergic to peanuts, would it be complete sacrilidge to make it without?

Man I am behind in my cook offs! Going to do fried chicken this weekend though.

Not sacrelige, but basically pointless, because the dish is totally out of balance without them. You'd be better off making Pad Siew, Lard Na, or Pad Kee Maow, three other Thai noodle dishes that are as equally as good, which have no peanuts.

Here's a Kee Maow Noodles I made a while back:

keemaow2.jpg

The predominant flavor profile in this dish is chili and basil -- "Kee Maow" means "drunken" because it is typically served as a hangover remedy.

Here's a Kee Maow recipe that looks pretty hardcore:

Kee Maow recipe at Bella Online (click)

And here's a good one for Pad Siew, which is made with Dark Soy.

Pad Siew Recipe at Importfood.com (click)


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hmmmm....the husband is deathly allergic to peanuts, would it be complete sacrilidge to make it without?

Man I am behind in my cook offs! Going to do fried chicken this weekend though.

If you're going to go no peanuts (last time I made them, I checked the bag of peanuts, which was empty -- thank you family, for once again putting an empty container back into the cupboard :shock: ), so I served it with lime wedges and a little dish of rice vinegar with sliced bird chilies, and it was just fine. Yes, I missed the peanuts, but if you've never had it with peanuts, you wouldn't miss them, I think. These are traditional accompaniments at the holes in the wall that sell pad thai in Bangkok.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By chromedome
      I've just finished reading an interesting article about a startup, Impossible Foods, which is working on a plant-based burger that will be indistinguishable from beef to the casual diner (you'll find it here: https://psmag.com/the-biography-of-a-plant-based-burger-31acbecb0dcc#.nfqtah12r). 
       
      For a while now I've been following the efforts of other researchers to create lab-grown meats (aka "beef in a bottle") from various sources. I've informally polled most of my omnivorous acquaintances about this, and the consensus seems to be that as long as it's 1) a good substitute, 2) price-competitive, and 3) comparable in nutrition, they'd probably give it a try (I live in a frugal part of the world, and price would play a large role here). 
       
      I'm curious to have the same kind of feedback from any vegetarians and vegans who participate here on the boards. Would you eat a meat substitute that was produced in the laboratory, all things being equal? Would it matter to you that it be all plant-based, or would you be willing to entertain the notion of a "genuine" artificial meat that was created without animals? 
    • By Chris Hennes
      While not a new cookbook by any means, I haven't really had time to dig into this one until now. We've previously discussed the recipes in Jerusalem: A Cookbook, but not much has been said about Plenty. So, here goes...
       
      Chickpea saute with Greek yogurt (p. 211)
       

       
      This was a great way to kick off my time with this book. The flavors were outstanding, particularly the use of the caraway seeds and lemon juice. I used freshly-cooked Rancho Gordo chickpeas, which of course helps! The recipe was not totally trivial, but considering the flavors developed, if you don't count the time to cook the chickpeas it came together very quickly. I highly recommend this dish.
    • By jamesglu
      I am going to be welcoming a group of Orthodox Jews to my lodge in New Zealand for Christmas and Boxing Day. They are kosher, but are willing to eat fish. What kind of starter do you think we can serve them that will be festive and yet not a violation of their religious observance?
    • By David Ross
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q8zTVlZ19c
       
      Mmmm.  The sweet, spiced aroma of a freshly baked pumpkin pie wafting over the Thanksgiving table.  A large bowl of chilled, sweetened cream is passed around the table, a cool dollop of cream cascading over a slice of “homemade” pumpkin pie.  (In many households, removing a frozen pie from a box and putting it in a hot oven is considered “homemade.”).
       
      Americans can’t seem to get enough pumpkin pie during the Holidays.  Some 50 million pumpkin pies are sold for Thanksgiving dinner and according to astute company marketing executives, 1 million of the pies are sold at Costco. And Mrs. Smith sells a few million of her oven-ready, frozen pumpkin pie.
       
      In August of 2013, we debuted the Summer Squash Cook-Off (http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145452-cook-off-63-summer-squash/)
      where we presented a number of tasty zucchini and patty pan dishes showcasing summer squash. But our squash adventure wasn’t over.  Today we expand our squash lexicon with the debut of eG Cook-Off #71: Winter Squash.
       
      (Click here http://forums.egulle...cook-off-index/ for the complete eG Cook-Off Index).
       
      Cut into jack-o-lanterns for Halloween and crafted into cheesecake for Thanksgiving, pumpkin reigns supreme each Fall.  But pumpkin is just one variety of winter squash--squash that grows throughout the summer and is harvested in fall.  The acorn, butternut, spaghetti, hubbard, kabocha, red kuri, delicata, calabaza and cushaw are but a few of the many winter squash cousins of the pumpkin.
       
      Winter squash is not always the best looking vegetable in the produce section--knobby, gnarled and multi-colored, winter squash has a hard, tough skin.  Peel back the unfashionable skin and sweet, rich squash meat is revealed. 
       
      Winter squash cookery doesn’t end after the last slice of pumpkin pie.  You can stuff it with a forcemeat of duck confit and sautéed mushrooms, purée roasted squash into a creamy soup garnished with lardons or slowly braise squash with peppers and corn in a spicy Caribbean stew. 
       
      Please join us in sharing, learning and savoring winter squash.
    • By worm@work
      Hi,
      I am a newbie both to this board and to the world of mexican cooking. I love tamales but the place where I live distinctly lacks good mexican restaurants. The best tamales I've tasted were made by my mexican friends mom at home and served fresh and they tasted like something that'd be served only in heaven. Am dying to try making them myself but I don't have the slightest idea how to get started. Can someone give me a tried and tested recipe using ingredients that I'm likely to be able to buy in the US? I'd be really really really grateful. Oh and I'm a vegetarian although I do eat eggs from time to time. So I need a vegetarian recipe too . Really looking forward to some help!!!
      Thanks a million,
      worm@work
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.