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boneless center cut pork loin


hazardnc
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My local Harris Teeter had boneless center cut pork loins on sale - buy one get one free - and I couldn't resist the deal.

Now I have TWO of these beasts and I am looking for recipes. I love a slow-cooked pork roat, but fear the pork loin is not fatty enough to endure a slow roast.

What are some suggestions?

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The last time I had a loin, I roasted it. I sliced some fennel, sweet onion and apple and layered that on the bottom of my cast iron skillet (it was a small roast) threw in a couple cloves of garlic, salt and pepper on the roast, a light dusting of herbes de provence, then I placed the roast on top of the fennel mixture. Roasted at a low temp about 325 until cooked. If the pan starts to dry out, I'll pour a little wine into the bottom of the pan.

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marinate in something good, like soy, peppers, and chopped ginger. Overnight.

Throw onto a very hot grill and char/sear a bit over charcoal.

Take it off direct heat, put the top on the grill, cook to medium temp, rest, slice, eat.

Delicious. They don't take very long either. Make sure to use a thermometer and pull just before it gets to temp. It will go the rest of the way as it rests.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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You can probably slow roast it if you wrapped the sucker with caul fat or a ton of bacon.

However, my favorite way to eat these are simply slicing them into filets, and pounding them down like you would a chicken breast and using them like you would chicken -- marsala wine sauce, cutlets, you name it.

You can also find yourself some bitter orange (mojo) marinade, thow it on the grill, and then slice it up and put on buttered garlic bread with some melted mozzarella cheese, or make Cubanos.

Brooks has a good alternative idea with the asian marinade as well.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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You can probably slow roast it if you wrapped the sucker with caul fat or a ton of bacon.

However, my favorite way to eat these are simply slicing them into filets, and pounding them down like you would a chicken breast and using them like you would chicken  -- marsala wine sauce, cutlets, you name it.

You can also find yourself some bitter orange (mojo) marinade, thow it on the grill, and then slice it up and put on buttered garlic bread with some melted mozzarella cheese, or make Cubanos.

Brooks has a good alternative idea with the asian marinade as well.

Hmmm - Cuban sandwiches! That wil give me an excuse to make yucca fries!

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Hi

I wish my local butcher would say 'buy one and get one free'. I will be the first one to queue up for loin of pork. Does it come with the skin on in the USA? Here in the UK it comes with skin and fat.

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This recipe has become a family favorite. I have made it at least a couple of dozen times. I did make a modification. I don't do the initial high heat. Then I roast at 325 F until the internal temp is 140 F. The fat comes out fine. If I want a little added crispness, I run it under the broiler.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Hi again

I just thought, how about going for a Spanish or Morroccan influence:

The key ingredient being smoked Spanish paprika,

salt,

black pepper

coriander seeds

cumin seeds

fennel seeds

garlic cloves crushed to a paste with salt

red wine vinegar.

fresh oregano

pinch of saffron

olive oil

Dice the pork loin into one inch cubes, put into a bowl with a marinade made of the above ingredients. Marinate for 2 hours in the fridge. Lay on to a hot griddle, cook for 3 minutes on each side.

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I almost forgot. As I am cooking for one, I usually cut one of the things into a small roast, maybe a couple of chops but I also may cube some of it up to make this ragout substituting the pork for the veal. (The price of veal around here, I can't imagine making stew out of it. We actually like the pork better.)

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Goya Mojo Criolla is a great product along the lines that Jason mentioned above. It is generally available in North America in any decent supermarket, I think, that has a Latin food section. Actually, I am a big fan of Goya in general. THey make a ton of good products.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Second MM on the Mojo Criollo. That is my go to for pork butt braising if I am up to smoking it. I have used it on the loin as well.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I usually just turn these into pork chops...I pick up a whole bonelss loin every few weeks at BJ's...like Costco

Tried something new last week had about an 8 inch section in the freezer..(this could have gone very wrong but).... nuked it enough to get the remote digital thermometer probe in there put it into a Le Cruset, poured apple juice on it then S&P and tossed in some pineapple I had in the fridge and 4 bruised juniper berries...set the thermometer for 150 and the oven at 400........basted a few times then after it made temp I reduced the juice to a glaze

It was awsome :blink:

tracey

oh served with boiled new potatoes and red cabbage

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

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This recipe has become a family favorite. I have made it at least a couple of dozen times. I did make a modification. I don't do the initial high heat. Then I roast at 325 F until the internal temp is 140 F. The fat comes out fine. If I want a little added crispness, I run it under the broiler.

Thanks, Fifi - I actually cut that recipe out of a magazine when it appeared and I made it one time - it was good.

I also regularly use the Goya Mojo, except I usually marinate shrimp for my shrimp fajitas. It is also good on chicken. Since the label says it is good on pork, I am sure it is! And, again, if I make pork loin in mojo for the main, I have an excuse to make yucca fries with mojo dip on the side. My husband loves Moros y Cristianos as well. Then, there will be the leftover pork which we can make into Media Noche or Cuban sandwiches. Hmmmm.

For the second pork loin, I am considering the Italian pork baised in milk. I read a brief mentino of this dish on the braising thread, but never read that it was tried. I have made Jamie Oliver's Chicken in Milk before and it was fabulous. In Italy, pork is the usual meat for te recipe.

My question - do leaner cuts such as this fare well when braised?

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use a knife to kind of unroll it into a big flat piece.  make a paste of olive oil, garlic, rosemary, thyme, marjoram, salt, pepper, and spread it all over the meat.  roll it back up, tie it, roast it.

i did that only i filled it with proschutto, and a blue goat cheese, then breaded the whole thing and baked it........

like a pork cordon bleu.........yummy

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This is our family favourite - been making it for years!

Pork Roasted with Garlic

3 1/2 lb boneless pork loin roast

6-8 minced cloves of garlic

1 tbsp ea. soya sauce and olive oil

1 tsp dried basil

1/2 tsp ea. salt & pepper

1/2 cup ea. chicken stock and white wine

1 tbsp cornstarch

2 tbsp cold water

With a sharp knife, score the roast in several places.

Make a paste of the garlic, soya sauce, olive oil, basil, salt and pepper, and rub all over pork, working into slits (it will be a thin coating)

Place pork on rack in a roasting pan and roast at 325F for about 2 hours or until meat thermometer registers 160F - DO NOT OVERCOOK.

Remove meat to a platter and cover with foil to keep warm. Pour excess fat from pan.

Over med-high heat, deglaze pan with stock and wine scraping up all those delicious stuck-on bits and bring to a boil*. Make a slurry of the cornstarch and water, whisk into the pan and bring to a boil stirring constantly until thickened slightly. Stir in any juices that have accumulated under the pork and remove from heat. Adjust seasoning with S&P and serve with the thinly sliced pork roast.

* If you like, you can strain the sauce into another saucepan before adding cornstarch slurry.

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

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I often do them in a Romertopf clay pot, with 10 minutes or so under the broiler at the end. Many variations of seasoning rubs. Sometimes I rub it with a good French mustard also.

I usually deal with the garlic by thinly slicing cloves of garlic, making 30 or 40 slits all over the loin, and inserting the slivers of garlic.

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