Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Gifted Gourmet

Tartiflette

Recommended Posts

:rolleyes: peut-être celui-ci?

LA TARTIFLETTE SAVOYARDE

Une vrai tartiflette must have cured savoyard ham or it is a cheap shadow of real Alpine cuisine! (Is that they one does it on the French boards, P'titPois?) :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:rolleyes: peut-être celui-ci?

LA TARTIFLETTE SAVOYARDE

Une vrai tartiflette must have cured savoyard ham or it is a cheap shadow of real Alpine cuisine! (Is that they one does it on the French boards, P'titPois?) :smile:

Sorry — some time ago I decided that I would never discuss about tartiflette anymore, and you can see that I have made a tremendous effort with clafoutis. :biggrin:

On my food forum (in French), both words are booby-trapped! Only those two words.

Seriously, I can tell you about the pela des Aravis, a traditional recipe that evolved recently into a touristy dish called "tartiflette", but AFAIK there is no such thing as a "vraie tartiflette".

For a pela, you need a nice ripe reblochon, diced potatoes and onions. The potatoes should be slowly roasted in butter with the onions, salt and pepper until they're nice and golden, almost soft. This already takes about half an hour. The potatoes should not stick to the pan.

Cut off some of the crust of the reblochon (at angles), scrub the remainder. Cut the reblochon in half horizontally like a layered cake and just lay both halves on the potatoes, cut side down. Leave the pan on very low heat and just forget about the whole thing for about 45 minutes or a bit more (NEVER stir), until the reblochon is melted and only a layer of warm crust covers the potatoes. Cut into pieces with a spatula and serve with a well-vinegared and shalloty green salad.

No ham, no bacon, no herbs, no oven. Just that.

What makes a pela interesting is the different stages of melted reblochon that can be found simultaneously in one serving: creamy and soft, crusty and pungent, and lightly browned and crunchy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:rolleyes: peut-être celui-ci?

LA TARTIFLETTE SAVOYARDE

Une vrai tartiflette must have cured savoyard ham or it is a cheap shadow of real Alpine cuisine! (Is that they one does it on the French boards, P'titPois?) :smile:

Sorry — some time ago I decided that I would never discuss about tartiflette anymore, and you can see that I have made a tremendous effort with clafoutis. :biggrin:

On my food forum (in French), both words are booby-trapped! Only those two words.

Seriously, I can tell you about the pela des Aravis, a traditional recipe that evolved recently into a touristy dish called "tartiflette", but AFAIK there is no such thing as a "vraie tartiflette".

: creamy and soft, crusty and pungent, and lightly browned and crunchy.

What's your French food forum? Probably a more fun way to practice my French in between class days than reading LeMonde online.

All I know about tartiflet is the one I ate while skiing in Les Trois Vallees last spring, which had ham. So I'm in no position to really argue. I guess I should have bought the souvenir tartiflette dish with the "authentic" recipe on the bottom, so I could compare it to yours. :biggrin:


Edited by Busboy (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Add some ham or bacon or sausauge (some local cured pork thing) to the pela ptipois described and you have a tartiflette.

The really cutting edge home cooks add savoy cabbage, creme fraiche and then call it a

cabbage and potato clafoutis.

Actually savoy is an interesting area of France, a passageway. I suspect ptipois can speak about this eloquently and of course quite vividly. :wink:

I think that tartifle means potato in Savoy. And tartiflettes are even more apparent in in the Aravis' area.

I can tell you about the pela des Aravis

I suspect she is telling us how to make a "tartiflette". Which is the way I would make it. I don't eat pork.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What's your French food forum?

Be our guest. (The forum is run by two persons, a Swiss chef and I.) Anybody else is welcome too, but French is the lingua franca there...

Beware though — as I wrote above, I kid you not, the two evil words are booby-trapped :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can tell you about the pela des Aravis

I suspect she is telling us how to make a "tartiflette". Which is the way I would make it. I don't eat pork.

Well, tartiflette doesn't really exist IMO, which is why I'm giving you the recipe for pela (which, incidentally, doesn't contain any pork).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, tartiflette doesn't really exist IMO, which is why I'm giving you the recipe for pela (which, incidentally, doesn't contain any pork).
This recipe was only recently introduced by the makers of Reblochon who needed to boost sales in the winter months. Although its origins were not exactly traditional, the result is fabulous, and has proven an instant hit in the Alps.

From this webiste.

Scroll down to the recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From this webiste.

Scroll down to the recipe.

Interesting info re the origin of the name reblochon. I'd never thought about cows having hind milk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[From this webiste.

Scroll down to the recipe.

Thank you. Historically, I disagree with the website. Pela is an old and traditional recipe. The true part is that tartiflette was recently evolved from pela to suit tourist appetites in ski resorts and boost reblochon sales. I never heard of tartiflette before the late 1980s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recall seeing tartiflettes on my ski trips in that area. Most of them, if not all had some pork product in them. I don't recall seeing it anywhere else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What's your French food forum?

Be our guest. (The forum is run by two persons, a Swiss chef and I.) Anybody else is welcome too, but French is the lingua franca there...

Beware though — as I wrote above, I kid you not, the two evil words are booby-trapped :laugh:

I doubt I'll be doing much posting until my French dramatically improves. Look for something around 2007.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:rolleyes: peut-être celui-ci?

LA TARTIFLETTE SAVOYARDE

Une vrai tartiflette must have cured savoyard ham or it is a cheap shadow of real Alpine cuisine! (Is that they one does it on the French boards, P'titPois?) :smile:

Sorry — some time ago I decided that I would never discuss about tartiflette anymore, and you can see that I have made a tremendous effort with clafoutis. :biggrin:

On my food forum (in French), both words are booby-trapped! Only those two words.

Seriously, I can tell you about the pela des Aravis, a traditional recipe that evolved recently into a touristy dish called "tartiflette", but AFAIK there is no such thing as a "vraie tartiflette".

For a pela, you need a nice ripe reblochon, diced potatoes and onions. The potatoes should be slowly roasted in butter with the onions, salt and pepper until they're nice and golden, almost soft. This already takes about half an hour. The potatoes should not stick to the pan.

Cut off some of the crust of the reblochon (at angles), scrub the remainder. Cut the reblochon in half horizontally like a layered cake and just lay both halves on the potatoes, cut side down. Leave the pan on very low heat and just forget about the whole thing for about 45 minutes or a bit more (NEVER stir), until the reblochon is melted and only a layer of warm crust covers the potatoes. Cut into pieces with a spatula and serve with a well-vinegared and shalloty green salad.

No ham, no bacon, no herbs, no oven. Just that.

What makes a pela interesting is the different stages of melted reblochon that can be found simultaneously in one serving: creamy and soft, crusty and pungent, and lightly browned and crunchy.

Oh my God. When I was in Wales recently I made a "tartiflette" in almost exactly this manner. The only difference was that as I was using Le Ratte potatoes I par-steamed them and I put a little white wine into the gratin, so that the melted cheese combined with this make a 'sauce'. I was being ordered about by some Frenchies from Grenoble, so maybe this helped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. My husband's family (originally from Auvergne) very thinly slices the potatoes and onions, layering them with onion and places the reblochon on top, and bakes... no precooking. It's much like his "potatoe pie" done in puff pastry with no cheese.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting. My husband's family (originally from Auvergne) very thinly slices the potatoes and onions, layering them with onion and places the reblochon on top, and bakes... no precooking. It's much like his "potatoe pie" done in puff pastry with no cheese.

In Auvergne, this is called a truffade, and cantal is used instead of reblochon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ptipois and I are secretly working on a tartiflette with turned potatoes, apericubes and Morteau jésu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is very interesting. I first had tartiflette only 2 years ago while in Geneva and Annecy....and that is where I fell in love with tartiflette. I tried a few recipes but they didn't taste right, until I saw Lucy's!

gallery_16100_231_1099280480.jpg

And that is the best tartiflette and only recipe I use now. But here in Seattle I can only get Reblochon once in a while when a very nice cheese seller sneaks it in to the country! :angry::angry::angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is very interesting. I first had tartiflette only 2 years ago while in Geneva and Annecy....and that is where I fell in love with tartiflette. I tried a few recipes but they didn't taste right, until I saw Lucy's!

gallery_16100_231_1099280480.jpg

And that is the best tartiflette and only recipe I use now. But here in Seattle I can only get Reblochon once in a while when a very nice cheese seller sneaks it in to the country!  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:

That looks like one really good tartiflette, Wendy. :cool:

I think you can get Reblochon from fromages.com. Tell me more about what ham you use, etc! Are you using creme fraiche epaisse or just heavy cream (That works quite well when you can't get creme fraiche)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting. My husband's family (originally from Auvergne) very thinly slices the potatoes and onions, layering them with onion and places the reblochon on top, and bakes... no precooking. It's much like his "potatoe pie" done in puff pastry with no cheese.

In Auvergne, this is called a truffade, and cantal is used instead of reblochon.

Does the "truffade" include creme in any form, or just the potatoes, onions, and cheese?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does the "truffade" include creme in any form, or just the potatoes, onions, and cheese?

It includes potatoes, cream, cantal, sometimes onions and preferably some Auvergne cured ham. A light dish, quoi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like one really good tartiflette, Wendy.  :cool:

I think you can get Reblochon from fromages.com.  Tell me more about what ham you use, etc!  Are you using creme fraiche epaisse or just heavy cream (That works quite well when you can't get creme fraiche)?

I use creme fraiche and smoky bacon I get from a local butcher sliced thick, then I cut it into lardons. It's really the best recipe, turns out just perfect! But then YOU know that already!! :biggrin:

I will check out fromages.com. Thank you!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several people have asked for details on how to make this, so here we go.
You need potatoes, lardons, onions, cream, milk, salt and pepper. And grated cheese. And butter.
Slice up the onions fairly thinly – about 1-2mm slices. Put them in a pan with hot butter and the lardons and fry them off until the onions are transparent and the lardons cooked through.
While this is cooking, slice your potatoes. I cut them 2mm thick using a mandoline (details on mandolines here – bonus chip recipe!) – be careful not to cut your fingers.
You need enough potatoes sliced to roughly fill your chosen container – I use a Pyrex dish, something more rustic is fine. I don’t bother peeling the potatoes first because I’m lazy and the skin’s good for you.
Put the potatoes in the dish, pour in enough cream and milk to almost cover them, put the lardons over the top and squish them into the crevices and in between the slices of potatoes.
Cover with a piece of tin foil and pop into the oven at 180°C for an hour. Uncover and check the potatoes are cooked, then sprinkle over a couple of handfuls of grated cheese, then back into the oven for another 10 minutes. Finish it with a few minutes under the grill if you like it really crispy.

A couple of notes:

  1. Yes, you can add garlic, either minced up with the onion or just cut a piece in half and wipe it around the inside of your baking dish. I don't do this because my young daughters find the taste too strong.
  2. Yes, you can add Reblochon cheese to the recipe. The problem with this is its price - the entire cost of the above version of the recipe is about €2; adding €12-15 worth of Reblochon changes the economics completely.
  3. No you can't add mushrooms. Mushrooms? Really?
  4. Actually you can add anything you want. Except white wine, as Felicity Cloake does in The Guardian. That's just wrong.

Edited by Chris Ward (log)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By pastrygirl
      There are two local grocery stores here who I'd like to try to sell chocolate to but they have policies forbidding GMO soy,  Soy lecithin is allowed only if organic or certified non-GMO. 
       
      I use a lot of Felchlin, some Valrhona, a little Cacao Barry. The only mention of GMOs I've found from Felchlin is this note in a brochure: GMO absence:  Felchlin fulfills current legislative requirements regarding GMO absence.  All Felchlin products comply with the Swiss Regulation and the European Council Regulation related to genetically modified organisms in food and feed.
       
      Does anybody know what those requirements are?  Is anything European going to be GMO-free?  Or labeled above some %?
       
       
    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
    • By Mullinix18
      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
    • By Mullinix18
      I have seen referenced in several places on the internet, including Wikipedia, a stat about escoffier recommending 40 minutes for scrambled eggs in a Bain Marie. I cant find where this number is from. On Wikipedia it refers to the book I currently own, the "Escoffier le guide culinaire" with forward by Heston Blumenthal by h. L. Cracknell...specificly page 157 for the 40 minute cooking time of scrambled eggs but it's not in my book on that page! Even tho there is the recipe for scrambled eggs on that page... I've seen the 1903 first edition online.. And it's not in there either.... Where is this number from?? Id like to know in case there is some even more complete book or something out there that I'm missing. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you. 
    • By DanM
      One of the surprises from our move to Switzerland is the availability of kosher charcuterie. Sausages of all types, confit, mousse, rietttes, etc... One of the recent finds is this block of smoked beef. It has a nice fat layer in the middle. Any thoughts on how to use it? Should I slice it thin and then fry?
       
      Any thoughts would be appreciated.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×