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chefzadi

Beautiful Algeria

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Boudjeghelou bel qedid

Yes, I think qedid is similar to kadid, the Tunisian dried meat preserve

Boudjeghelou be Dersa

I think dersa is brains or some other kind of innard.

Qadid and kedid are the same thing--transliteration problems again. This is how Kazmirski defines it: pieces of meat cut into long strips, spiced, and dried in the sun, then salted and conserved (Kaz. II: 683).

Dirsa, which I wrote about in "Feast," is chile-based hot sauce.

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Rougag as street food.

gallery_25768_872_16702.jpg


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Algerian Rice dishes

Algerian rice dishes are called pilav, pilaf, plahou, roz and rouz. The dishes are one pot meals cooked like a paella or steamed like couscous. In Oran paella is called paella with a range of spices used and with the heat of chili peppers.

Rice is also used as an ingredient for dolmas.

a few recipes to follow.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I'd like to tie up this thread for now, unless anyone as specific questions about recipes.

I'm working on the second draft which should be completed in 2-3 months. All of the historical information will be sent scholars for verification. I have over 100 Amazigh recipes, mostly from the Kabyle and over 500 other recipes. My always supportive wife is actually learning Tamzight, Algerian Darja and Classical Arabic food terms. The accuracy of the terms will be verified with linguists.

I'm also working on curriculum for a series of workshops on Algerian cuisine that I will be conducting for professionals and students, organizing a special event for foods from the Ancient World, blogging, an online culinary course (I will wait for the powers that be to announce what it is, no it's not on Algerian cooking) and volunteering/donating my services at local shelters...

Thank you all for your feedback and input in this discussion.


Edited by chefzadi (log)

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I wanted to add that Indian Atta flour is very similar to a type of flour used in Algeria for flat breads. I would recomend this for the stuffed flat bread recipes especially and also the layered bread with smen or butter. Atta flour produces a nearly identical flavor to what would be found in Algeria.

I like plain semolina kesra but I do know that it can be a bit too heavy in texture for non-Magrhebians.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Well, thank goodness I finally made my way over here, to investigate your own "labor of love," Chef. Your thoroughness and care are extraordinary. Your sense of place is palpable, and your language is evocative.

I have never had this kind of food, I don't think -- or if I have, it wasn't memorable. I am very much looking forward for an opportunity to try it, though I think I lack the courage to try it without a net, not knowing what it's supposed to taste like.

I hope we can break bread together one day soon.

Thank you for all this amazing hard work.

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I've just read through this incredibly informative and interesting forum. Thank you! I was wondering if you knew anything about all those amazing Algerian pastries I've sampled in Paris. I'm particularly interested in something called DZIRIATE (or some such transliteraton), which is a pastry cup filled with nut paste and honey.

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I've just read through this incredibly informative and interesting forum. Thank you!  I was wondering if you knew anything about all those amazing Algerian pastries I've sampled in Paris. I'm particularly interested in something called DZIRIATE (or some such transliteraton), which is a pastry cup filled with nut paste and honey.

Yes, I know about Algerian pastries and dziriates. It's pretty easy to make at home.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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gallery_25768_872_6186.jpg

gallery_25768_872_7589.jpg

These photos of beautiful Algeria were taken by my friend Bachir, an Algerian brother.

There are 27 more photos in Bachir's album on "Our Rai" a multi-contributor blog.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I've added more photos from my friend Bachir.

Also, I want to say that I've decided to publish my Algerian cookbook in the form of a blog. I just started a multi-author blog that writers such as Paula Wolfert and Rachel Lauden have signed up to be guest authors for and the content is already growing at a rapid rate and as well as the number of daily hits.

I can't help but believe that publishing a cookbook in the form of a blog will reach a much larger audience than a book. I've never been concerned that much with the sales to begin with because of the support I would get from the school I teach at which is a recognized name brand throughout the world.

I really feel a blog is an exciting new form, a living thing in a sense. Readers can comment, ask questions, photographs are inexpensive to download so I can do an entire photographed tutorial on how to chop an onion for instance. A pciture is worth a thousand words especially when it comes to cookery.

There will be ads, I have a family to support, we gotta eat. But they will be just that ads and not ads disguised as product suggestions. And the upside to the reader is that it's free.

I'll invest in some video equiptment to do video presentations as well.

Feedback?


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Will the blog-cookbook have recipes indexed by category and alphabetical order? I think those would be the most important things to do in order to create a useful reference.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Will the blog-cookbook have recipes indexed by category and alphabetical order? I think those would be the most important things to do in order to create a useful reference.

Yes, everything will be organized into categories.

I also know professional translators who have offered their services.


Edited by chefzadi (log)

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Algerian cuisine online

I started it a couple of days ago. Content will be added daily with lots of step by step photos. I see the blog going on for years even with daily posts.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Algerian cuisine online

I started it a couple of days ago. Content will be added daily with lots of step by step photos. I see the blog going on for years even with daily posts.

Thanks; that is so cool!

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I'm starting to post recipes for Ramadan!

The Ramadan recipes are being linked to by Muslims allover. :smile:


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Very cool! I like the bilingual approach, too. It would be pretty neat if you could post this in Arabic AND English, but that's probably a lot more work from a blogging standpoint.

You have links and links and recipes and photos...this is going to be a nice site.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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The full French translations will be done in audio, possibly for broadcast.

Eventually it will be translated in Arabic, possibly other languages.

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I'm a little overwhelmed with the requests. I started the Algerian blog about 2 months ago. The translations are coming. I can't cover over 3,000 years of history in 2 months in multiple languages! :biggrin:

Look forward to a video presentation of an Algerian sea urchin preparation from an Algerian-American grad student.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Farid Zadi is going to be doing some cooking classes in Texas this month - I'm totally clueless about Algerian food and want to come to his Austin class with a little knowledge about what I am going to be eating.

Does anyone have any good suggestions for reading material?

Thanks.

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