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Need Cake Ideas for dad's 80th bday


Tepee
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You can't see from the pic but 'cake' has 8 layers of different hues of green, blue and clear. Inside - and I buried them too deep - swims 8 koi fishies made from agar-agar. You can barely make them out too. Lotus flower is made of white chocolate and as I took the photo, I saw it melting right before my eyes. It was upright and pristine when I made it...sob.

It's gorgeous. Good designers know that it's ok and often best to "keep it simple".

Thank you for sharing the picture. Any chance of a recipe?

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I'm quite shy to show this because it's so simple. You can't see from the pic but 'cake' has 8 layers of different hues of green, blue and clear. Inside - and I buried them too deep - swims 8 koi fishies made from agar-agar.

That sure is beautiful, Tepee! You are an admirable food artist!

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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It's a beautiful cake TP!

Didn't even realise the white choc lotus flower had melted. Thought it was meant to be as is ... like embossed on the jelly cake /pond. The hues of the green blue pond are gorgeous.

You're welcome - mudbug.

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Hmmm...The more I learn about this Teepee, the more I like her.  Amazing artwork. :wub:

You guys ain't seen nuthin' yet.

Come on, Tepee! Don't be shy. Share your website with ALL your creations.

Just click on TPcal! at the bottom of her post.

Trust me, guys. You ain't seen huthin' yet!

Edited by Dejah (log)

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Just click on TPcal! at the bottom of her post.

This is assuming your user "Board Settings" are set to view signatures by the way.. which I usually have turned "off".

Tepee,

The Peach Mousse Cake sounds divine. :biggrin:

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No currying for me, please. I happened on this thread because I was following the "Soup Dumpling" one...my first time in this area.

The CAKE IS AMAZING!!! Just for me, it will be long remembered for its lovely transparency and the idea of the koi, and the perfect smoothness of the pond. And the lotus---the translucence of the petals is a once-in-a-lifetime creation, and if it was melting, you must preserve that technique for all future flowers, because it's just the most beautiful cake topping I've ever seen.

I'm so glad you strayed from peaches and tigers---this one was a picture I'll not forget soon. Beautiful.

Could you do a little step-by-step on the "green" and "clear" and frosting, etc.? This is my "beautiful" for the day. wow :wub:

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