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Enjoying food while losing weight


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I think part of the answer is to do whatever will work for you. And if it's unconventional...well, go for it. The accepted ways of eating are just the ones which are accepted today. Who knows about tomorrow? I remember years ago seeing a nutritionist who could not work organic peanut butter or nuts into a diet plan...this was not for weight, but for sugar intolerance. Gave up on "nutritionists" that day. Oh, and we were at the time long time vegetarians and she didn't approve of that either.

As for cabbage being yummy as a substitute for pasta. Well. No. It's acceptable. Different but OK.

Chinese foods are a good way in this family. (I don't really know Thai at all, I'm sorry to say.) Speaking of Hot and Sour Soup...I made a humongous batch of it yesterday...it sort of 'grew' as I went along. Delicious. And now I have 11 2-portion containers of it in the freezer. It's a perfect supper for us. And if I eat more than I need...well what does it matter?

I'll start the hot water routine today. To me, almost all herbal teas taste like hot water anyway, so why bother? I'll just add lemon or lime juice to the glass and all will be well.

I agree with Mjx...low carb substitutions are depressing, but there are so many delicious low-carb dishes out there in which you are not subbing anything. There is nothing worse than low-carb bread. Now that to me is an abomination. Many years ago I did make a sprouted grain bread which I think was called Essene bread. Can't even remember why. Think I'll Google it.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I suppose it was just those low carb baked goods that made me ask the question of substitutes. I haven't even tried any yet.

I'm a firm believer that different things will work for different people and you have to figure out what works for you at that moment.

I am doing low carb because of my dr's recommendation. I am fine most of the time, but I had some trouble when relatives visited recently.

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I suppose it was just those low carb baked goods that made me ask the question of substitutes. I haven't even tried any yet.

I'm a firm believer that different things will work for different people and you have to figure out what works for you at that moment.

I am doing low carb because of my dr's recommendation. I am fine most of the time, but I had some trouble when relatives visited recently.

As for low carb baked goods...fuggadaboutit. (don't know how to spell that one.)

As for when the relatives visit...it simply doesn't count. Eat whatever you need to eat to make the visit flow nicely...and then go back to your diet as soon as they leave. Oh, that's my mantra. lol.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I have been following an anchestoral diet for a year now. I am not doing it for weightloss. But for better health and longer disease free life. I ditched all grains, sugar and all industrial neolithic foods. I dont eat dairy or drink alchohol anymore.

I started very low carb to get my body totally fat adapted. Now i eat some potatoes after training or road cycling. When not excersising i dont need many carbs. I eat plenty of healthy unprocessed fats.

That means absolutely no Omega 6 rich seed oils like canola.

I use virgin coconut oil, duck fat, bone marrow fat and home rendered pastered tallow.

I eat plenty of vegetables and mushrooms a day. Usually somewhere between 1-2 kg. Several organic pastured eggs per day.

Offal foods like liver, kidney, marrow and heart, every week. And wild fish 4-5 times a week.

I strive to eat nutrient dense foods. I dont eat foreign fruits, only local wild berries (they are free too!:).

I feel good, i have less depression, sleep is vastly better. Blood pressure dropped alot. Had full blood tests done and all vitamin levels are great.

I have no desire to eat oreos, bread, pasta or other crap very nutrition poor foods anymore.

Only unprosessed simple nutritious foods without labels. Its amazing how easy this is.

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We are also reducing our regular use of processed foods. I wouldn't call it an ancestral, or primal diet, but I am now buying grass fed or pasture raised meet and dairy, weaning my kids off of processed foods (a bit unsuccessfully as yet), etc.

I like that strategy, Darienne. it didn't help that the visit coincided with Halloween (double whammy) but I"m slowly getting back in the groove. I lost about 15 lbs, but have vacillated around the same weight for the last month, up and down.

Day to day cooking doesn't much inspire me. So I often struggle with weeknight dinners, or meals when I have to prep ahead of time to eat at work. Plus I have 2 little kids with varying levels of pickiness.

Tonight we had a broccoli salad. I steamed broccoli, and mixed it with some other salad fixings and chickpeas. Sounds boring, but it was actually surprisingly tasty. and the kids loved it. But I have weirdo toddlers who love broccoli. You'd think I'd embrace that and make chicken and broccoli every night.

For breakfast I often have eggs. Lately I have been feeling like I need to branch out more but haven't gotten things together enough to make something else. Lunch is typically eating out if I'm in the office, or leftovers. However, as much as I want to, I end up eating things out of convenience rather than well thought out meals.

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I would think that having young children would make this sort of eating life very difficult. However, kids who love broccoli. They are keepers for sure.

Broccoli is one of my favorites. We have a favorite broccoli and cauliflower salad which uses the florets. Then I use the stalks to make soup. Yumm.

Fifteen pounds off is a goodly amount. Good for you.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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My biggest epiphany: cook and eat anything you want IN MODERATE QUANTITIES. Do not fool yourself by thinking you can eat more of low fat foods. Unless they bring you satisfaction, mental as well as physical, you will eat more of them and wind up with additional pounds.

So back to "cooking for weight loss": Cook no more than you should eat. Do not prepare a recipe that serves 6 if you are a family of 4, or for 4 if you are only 2. And read labels as to serving size. 2 oz of dry pasta is a serving size; I cook 3 oz for my husband and me and it has become enough.

Again, we don't eat "diet food" or eliminate butter or cream or eggs. But we do eat them in moderation and along side lots of fresh vegetables.

eGullet member #80.

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I recommend this one:

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/Food-Plate-600dpi.jpg

Very healthy, notice complete lack of processed foods. No grains or sugar except rice.

I did a short period of ketogenic diet to get my body fat adapted. I am very lean (10% body fat)

but even then i had difficulties maintaining enough weight so i added potatoes back.

Ketogenic diet removes almost all hunger. I never count calories. No need to with whole

foods diet, almost impossible to eat too much vegetables, meat and fish.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/10-real-life-reasons-why-the-primal-blueprint-works-for-me/

Edited by Jan Virtanen (log)
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Interesting topic! I'm convinced that losing/maintaining weight is a very personal journey and we each have to find our own path, but that the bottom line is calories in + calories expended. You could lose weight eating only twinkies, but you wouldn't be very healthy :blink: .

I got serious about a year ago, didn't want to count, measure, or any of that stuff, and decided to eat 3 meals a day, period, of small/medium-ish portions. I don't allow myself to have seconds. Mostly vegetarian, some fish, I eat meat if someone else serves it to me. I eat lots of carbs, but only whole grain, and splash olive oil around liberally, but butter is special occasion only. Also only for rare treats: sweeteners, dessert, cheese. I avoid processed food, make my own bread, granola, etc., mostly because I enjoy doing so.

I don't snack, ever--the big plus in this is that I don't need to make constant decisions about what I'm going to snack on and I find that much easier for me to deal with. I don't miss it, now that it's a habit, and I really enjoy my 3 meals, try to make them special. I do make 2-4+ servings when I cook, because I like having leftovers.

I will admit this style of eating is easier for me because I live alone, my family is grown, but it has worked extremely well for me. Over the past year, I've lost 90 lbs. :biggrin:

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I will admit this style of eating is easier for me because I live alone, my family is grown, but it has worked extremely well for me. Over the past year, I've lost 90 lbs. :biggrin:

Congratulations are definitely in order for such dedication and will power. :smile:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I have been watching this thread with interest as it is very timely for me and my hubby. We both discovered a cholesterol issue on recent doctor's visits and I have been considering another run at the low carb. diets. I have big issues with not baking, food, baking is such a huge part of our lives I was not sure how I was going to handle this and not feel like we are depriving ourselves. After reading this thread I think I will "have a go" at it.

Regards,

Kat

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Had a guest this weekend and had a blow-out weekend for the diet. And what was best of all?

Excellent bread with cold butter. Better than the wine, the homemade apple pie, the pulled pork, etc. Yep. The bread and butter. Yummm. :wub:

Tomorrow...back to the salt mines. :raz:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Darienne,

I think that having a blow-out every once in a while is a good thing! And you clearly enjoyed it. :laugh: You can't be perfect all of the time. The trick is to get right back on your healthy eating plan and keep moving forward.

I think it's the behavior over time that hurts us, not any one meal.

Kat,

Check out the author Gary Taubes. He discusses low carb diets and heart disease with respect to current research (books and blog). I think his basic premise is that cholesterol may not be the right biomarker for heart disease. Rather it's triglycerides and certain types of LDL. Anyway, basically low carb diets reduce these biomarkers even if you don't drop huge pounds. It was true for me, actually. Within 6 weeks of cutting out most processed carbs, my blood lipid levels were all well in the "normal" range, although my doctor would be happy if I raised my HDL a little more. Oh, and I have a hard time giving up baking. I have moved to making chocolates, mostly, and giving it all away as quickly as I can. Though I feel a little guilty foisting all of that sugar and processed carb to others.

Jan, I really like that food plate link, but I couldn't get the second link to work. I'm printing out that food plate, though.

I've actually been having trouble maintaining this eating style lately. Outside pressure mostly.

I have to keep reminding myself that I'm making food choices because they make me healthier, not because of a diet.

Speaking of which: I'm hosting american Thanksgiving this year for my family. Not the first time, but definitely the first time now that I've been avoiding breads, etc. My inlaws are definitely not low carbers. And it's Thanksgiving, which typically has a lot of starchy components. So I'm struggling a little bit with the menu. Anyone have suggestions?

edited for baking comment., and again because I didn't like the way I phrased something :rolleyes:

Edited by Viktoria (log)
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Speaking of which: I'm hosting american Thanksgiving this year for my family. Not the first time, but definitely the first time now that I've been avoiding breads, etc. My inlaws are definitely not low carbers. And it's Thanksgiving, which typically has a lot of starchy components. So I'm struggling a little bit with the menu. Anyone have suggestions?

Yep. But you may not really like it. :hmmm:

Do a traditional Thanksgiving and make them happy. This will avoid all discussions of your dietary changes, all misunderstandings, all tension, all bad things. Just give it up for this one meal. Period. (At least that's what I would do. And go back to your diet the next meal.) :smile:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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. . . .

Speaking of which: I'm hosting american Thanksgiving this year for my family. Not the first time, but definitely the first time now that I've been avoiding breads, etc. My inlaws are definitely not low carbers. And it's Thanksgiving, which typically has a lot of starchy components. So I'm struggling a little bit with the menu. Anyone have suggestions?

As others have pointed out, just letting things go may be the happiest solution. Which dishes/types of dishes were you particularly concerned about, and how strictly traditional are your family's expectations likely to be? Often, if there's turkey squatting at the centre of everything else, a good fifty percent of people feel that things are 'right', but this does vary.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Kathyann, thanks for reminding us that it is lifestyle and not just weight loss that should be the goal. Your pattern is sustainable and, as you point out with meat, allows for the very occasional inclusion of richer foods. We need to remember to "just say no" to fads and quick fixes. It's everyday forever that counts. Again many, many thanks for the wake-up call.

Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)

eGullet member #80.

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I can find enough low carb foods on the Thanksgiving table to satisfy me. Let everyone else eat the stuffing and the sweet potatoes and pie--I will have turkey, salad, green beans, brussels sprouts (and maybe a little smidge of everything else, just because it is Thanksgiving!) If you are afraid that everything will be too carby, make sure that there are salads and veggies--others will appreciate it. (I am hosting this year, too, and I will be putting out the traditional stuff--maybe not so much of it as usual, so I don't have to deal with leftovers.)

I eat that way at potlucks and buffets--fill your plate with the good stuff (veggies and meat) and take a little taste of stuff you just can resist. Nobody ever notices.

Edited by sparrowgrass (log)
sparrowgrass
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I agree that it's best to include a variety of foods to satisfy the preferences of both you and your guests. And if somebody bugs you for not eating enough mashed potatoes, you can say, "You know, lately I've been completely obsessed with this brussels sprouts recipe--I could just live off of them!" In other words, don't make it appear like you're depriving yourself. People generally don't like to pig out when it seems that someone else in their group is depriving themselves.

Edited by sheetz (log)
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In other words, don't make it appear like you're depriving yourself. People generally don't like to pig out when it seems that someone else in their group is depriving themselves.
If that is others' reaction to your eating sensibly, it could be the biggest favor you have ever done them.

eGullet member #80.

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Kathyann, thanks for reminding us that it is lifestyle and not just weight loss that should be the goal. Your pattern is sustainable and, as you point out with meat, allows for the very occasional inclusion of richer foods. We need to remember to "just say no" to fads and quick fixes. It's everyday forever that counts. Again many, many thanks for the wake-up call.

Lifestyle is exactly right! My personal plan for Thanksgiving involves eating whatever I want, but just a little of each thing. I'm eating elsewhere this year, so I just need to not bring anything back home with me; when it's at my house, I make sure other people take home all the stuff I don't want around.

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After thinking about the menu for a while, I think that I would also feel like something was missing from thanksgiving if I didn't have stuffing, potatoes, etc. So I'll make sure that there are lots of healthy veggies to eat and indulge in small amounts of the others. The in laws will be happy, I will be happy, everybody wins. :wub:

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After thinking about the menu for a while, I think that I would also feel like something was missing from thanksgiving if I didn't have stuffing, potatoes, etc. So I'll make sure that there are lots of healthy veggies to eat and indulge in small amounts of the others. The in laws will be happy, I will be happy, everybody wins. :wub:

Yes! Weight loss and maintaining that loss (which is the hard part) requires a change of lifestyle that becomes a permanent part of your life. Depriving yourself is not going to work long term, nor is "I can never eat <whatever> ever again." The trick is in finding guidelines for yourself that allow you to have what you love in a controlled and sensible manner. For example, restaurants. I walk in knowing I can order anything I want, but as soon as it's served to me I divide it in half and eat only half. The rest I bring home and eat over the next couple of days. I *love* baking and desserts. If I have guests, I'll bake something and have a small piece, then send the rest home with them. "Can't keep it in the house" is my rule on that one. And I have been known to tie a scarf around my face, bandit style, to keep my fingers out of the bowl while I'm cooking :laugh:

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