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What's your favorite reduction sauce?


SWISS_CHEF
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I like simple food and one of my favorite things is a thick filet mignon of beef and a good reduction sauce. How do you make yours?

Here is one I like:

600ml brown pork stock

100ml tawny port

200ml full bodied red wine

30ml red wine vinegar

4 finely diced shallots

2 crushed cloves garlic

sprig thyme

1 star anise

50g unsalted butter

Fry shallots and garlic until golden brown, deglace with vinegar, reduce until evaporated. Add port, reduce until evaporated. Add red wine, reduce by half. Add thyme and star anise. Add pork stock, simmer until correct consistency. Strain and finish with butter off the heat.

Check seasoning, acidify with a little sherry vinegar if needed.

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I like simple food and one of my favorite things is a thick filet mignon of beef and a good reduction sauce. How do you make yours?

Here is one I like:

600ml brown pork stock

100ml tawny port

200ml full bodied red wine

30ml red wine vinegar

4 finely diced shallots

2 crushed cloves garlic

sprig thyme

1 star anise

50g unsalted butter

Fry shallots and garlic until golden brown, deglace with vinegar, reduce until evaporated. Add port, reduce until evaporated. Add red wine, reduce by half. Add thyme and star anise. Add pork stock, simmer until correct consistency. Strain and finish with butter off the heat.

Check seasoning, acidify with a little sherry vinegar if needed.

Well SWISS CHEF,

Your reduction sounds like it is very ballanced and profesional, I have quite a few reductions I like to make for different things, red wine & shallot for Beef, Basimic for Calfs Liver, Casis for wild duck, Brandy & cracked black pepper for pepperd fillet steak and so on. It is my dark stock that I use for these reductions that I am proud of though. I place equal amounts of veal shin, skinned duck necks and chicken legs ( I do not roast or colour these) in a large stock pot with cold water then bring it up to the barest simmer then I skim the first impurities and foam off the top and add my raw carrot, onion, leek, garlic and four plum tomatoes that I squash a bit in my hands before putting them in. I cook this on the lowest of heats skimming from time to time for a day, Then I strain the stock add a bottle of red wine and reduce it down till I am left with a liter of the stuff. Its very nicely balanced and is much nicer than a stock made with roasted bones, even though it is a perfect dark viscus sheany brown.

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Fry shallots and garlic until golden brown, deglace with vinegar, reduce until evaporated. Add port, reduce until evaporated. Add red wine, reduce by half. Add thyme and star anise. Add pork stock, simmer until correct consistency. Strain and finish with butter off the heat.

Check seasoning, acidify with a little sherry vinegar if needed.

Question, Swiss One..why reduce port? why not add at towards the end? iirc, fortified wines dont need to be reduced? did i remember right?

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Fry shallots and garlic until golden brown, deglace with vinegar, reduce until evaporated. Add port, reduce until evaporated. Add red wine, reduce by half. Add thyme and star anise. Add pork stock, simmer until correct consistency. Strain and finish with butter off the heat.

Check seasoning, acidify with a little sherry vinegar if needed.

Question, Swiss One..why reduce port? why not add at towards the end? iirc, fortified wines dont need to be reduced? did i remember right?

I let the port evaporate so that it starts to caramelize to burn off some of the sugar and give the sauce some extra color, but the question is fair enough and next time I make it I will try it your way and add the port towards the end and see what happens.

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Here is one of my favorite sauces, not sure if it counts as a reduction or not:

1 Cup Heavy Cream

1/2 Cup Tequila

1/2 Cup Tabasco

2 Tbl Chili Powder

2 Tbl extra hot cayenne powder

1 Tbl fresh ground cumin

1 Tbl Mexican Oregano

1 Tbl Garlic powder, or several cloves freshly chopped

1 Tbl Onion Flakes

1 Tbl vinegar (any will do)

Just basically toss it all in together, let it simmer till very thick, then top it over chicken or pork. Fresh cilantro towards the end also helps.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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I can't say I have a favorite, because most of them are related and it comes down to tweeking them to fit the particular dish. One that sticks in my mind was for a wild pheasant breast that was particularly good. I seared the breast, finished it in the oven. Removed to rest. Added shallots. I forget what I deglazed with...might have just been white wine. Add a medium demi. Reduce. Add a dolop of homeade crabapple jelly. Swirl of butter, and plate. Killer good.

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Here is one of my favorite sauces, not sure if it counts as a reduction or not:

1 Cup Heavy Cream

1/2 Cup Tequila

1/2 Cup Tabasco

2 Tbl Chili Powder

2 Tbl extra hot cayenne powder

1 Tbl fresh ground cumin

1 Tbl Mexican Oregano

1 Tbl Garlic powder, or several cloves freshly chopped

1 Tbl Onion Flakes

1 Tbl vinegar (any will do)

Just basically toss it all in together, let it simmer till very thick, then top it over chicken or pork. Fresh cilantro towards the end also helps.

This sauce will be my next experiment...Thank you

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Here is one of my favorite sauces, not sure if it counts as a reduction or not:

1 Cup Heavy Cream

1/2 Cup Tequila

1/2 Cup Tabasco

2 Tbl Chili Powder

2 Tbl extra hot cayenne powder

1 Tbl fresh ground cumin

1 Tbl Mexican Oregano

1 Tbl Garlic powder, or several cloves freshly chopped

1 Tbl Onion Flakes

1 Tbl vinegar (any will do)

Just basically toss it all in together, let it simmer till very thick, then top it over chicken or pork. Fresh cilantro towards the end also helps.

Just two questions... is Mexican oregano hugely different from regular oregano? If so, in what way? Also, how can "any vinegar" do, when you are so specific about oregano? I have six or seven vinegars and I would be hesitant to use any one of them for the same use as any of the others.

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ust two questions... is Mexican oregano hugely different from regular oregano? If so, in what way? Also, how can "any vinegar" do, when you are so specific about oregano? I have six or seven vinegars and I would be hesitant to use any one of them for the same use as any of the others.

Mexican oregano is more intensly flavored. I've only seen the dried version in regular markets. And I haven't looked for fresh in Mexican markets. Anyway, in that recipe it seems that Italian oregano would be fine.

A plain white wine vinegar seems suited for that recipe.

But then again I am left totally speechless by it. :shock::biggrin: But nullo is a more is more kind of egulleter which is great. :smile:

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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ust two questions... is Mexican oregano hugely different from regular oregano? If so, in what way? Also, how can "any vinegar" do, when you are so specific about oregano? I have six or seven vinegars and I would be hesitant to use any one of them for the same use as any of the others.

Mexican oregano is more intensly flavored. I've only seen the dried version in regular markets. And I haven't looked for fresh in Mexican markets. Anyway, in that recipe it seems that Italian oregano would be fine.

A plain white wine vinegar seems suited for that recipe.

But then again I am left totally speechless by it. :shock::biggrin: But nullo is a more is more kind of egulleter which is great. :smile:

You know...plain white vinegar is the one vinegar I don't own!!! LOL! Actually it is hard to find here in Europe. The closest I can come is white wine vinegar. Well never mind...mine will be a "version" of the sauce.

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I would think you would steer clear of red wine vinegar for color reasons. White would probably be adequate, but perhaps cider or sherry would work. Pure speculation.

You might experiment with lemon or lime instead...although citris acids can do unintended things to cream.

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I have never really used beef stocks for reductions. They can be great for soups.

Here is another one I did recently at home without stock.

Sear a couple of pork tenderloins and finish in the oven. Remove from pan with drippings to rest. Add shallot or minced onion. Deglaze with dark rum. Add drippings. Add a touch of grade B maple syrup. Reduce. Dollop of home made peach preserve. Swirls of butter(really doesn't need it). Plate.

I have made a rub for pork loin with tequila lime and brown sugar. Roast off the loin. When it is about 20 minutes from done(I know, that can be hard to surmise) Pull it out and rub it down. Pop it back in the oven at high temp.

When it comes out, you can rest the loin and make a pan sauce out of the drippings(and a little stock if need be). Very good.

Durring the holidays I roasted a pork loin stuffed with cranberry , cassis, and carmelized onions. I had some granny smith apples with me for garnish. The cliet and I snacked on the apples before the guests arrived and he commented that he loves granny smith apples. I decided to improv a sauce for the pork. I sauted slices of the apples in shallots and butter, deglazed with white wine and reduced a little medium demi with it. Supurb.

I really need to get my head checked...I seem to be cooking a lot of pork and fruit.

One of the basic ones I used a lot was to sear tournedos. Add shitake and shallot. Deglaze with madeira. Add demi. Reduce. Swirl butter(again if needed or wanted...if not, just reduce to consistency)

Really what it comes down to are good stock...usually reduced already, an aromatic (shallot and or herbs), the apropriate deglazing liquid (usually alcohol, but doesn't have to be), and an appropriate garnish (mushrooms, veggies, fruits, nuts....) Out of these basic components, an endless selection can be composed.

I have used cream, but do so less and less. It is a shame to carefully reduce a stock and then muddy it with cream. There are some dishes that just have to have it, but many don't. I am strting to feel the same way about butter. Butter can richen, thicken and enhance a sauce without stepping all over it like cream is likely to do.

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I like simple food and one of my favorite things is a thick filet mignon of beef and a good reduction sauce. How do you make yours?

Here is one I like:

600ml brown pork stock

100ml tawny port

200ml full bodied red wine

30ml red wine vinegar

4 finely diced shallots

2 crushed cloves garlic

sprig thyme

1 star anise

50g unsalted butter

Fry shallots and garlic until golden brown, deglace with vinegar, reduce until evaporated. Add port, reduce until evaporated. Add red wine, reduce by half. Add thyme and star anise. Add pork stock, simmer until correct consistency. Strain and finish with butter off the heat.

Check seasoning, acidify with a little sherry vinegar if needed.

Well SWISS CHEF,

Your reduction sounds like it is very ballanced and profesional, I have quite a few reductions I like to make for different things, red wine & shallot for Beef, Basimic for Calfs Liver, Casis for wild duck, Brandy & cracked black pepper for pepperd fillet steak and so on. It is my dark stock that I use for these reductions that I am proud of though. I place equal amounts of veal shin, skinned duck necks and chicken legs ( I do not roast or colour these) in a large stock pot with cold water then bring it up to the barest simmer then I skim the first impurities and foam off the top and add my raw carrot, onion, leek, garlic and four plum tomatoes that I squash a bit in my hands before putting them in. I cook this on the lowest of heats skimming from time to time for a day, Then I strain the stock add a bottle of red wine and reduce it down till I am left with a liter of the stuff. Its very nicely balanced and is much nicer than a stock made with roasted bones, even though it is a perfect dark viscus sheany brown.

Sounds good to me. Do you ever have problems with the garlic?

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One of the most popular dishes at the Montreal bistro Le P'tit Plateau is venison grilled rare and served with a zingy reduction sauce. The chef, Alain Loivel, once described it to me in vague terms. Here's my adaptation; measurements are approximate because I've always played it by ear. Can vouch for its compatability with venison, caribou and duck and snow goose breasts; don't see why it wouldn't work with beef.

Pour a bottle of fruity, not highly acidic and preferably unoaked red wine into a sauté pan. Add whole "warm" spices of your choosing; I typically use a few cloves, a star anise, a cinnamon stick and a few cardamon pods and sometimes throw in a dried chile pepper or two. Bring to a boil and reduce until thick (i.e. by 3/4 to 7/8). Strain and set aside. Put 2 or 3 tablespoons of sugar in a saucepan, add 3 tablespoons each of sherry vinegar and water and bring to a boil. Boil off the liquid over medium heat. Watching constantly and tilting the pan occasionally, allow the sugar to caramelize. As soon as the caramel turns golden, remove the pan from the heat and pour in the red wine reduction. Stir to dissolve. Although Chef Loivel doesn't, you can mount the sauce with butter if you find it too sharp; otherwise, it's fat free.

Another wine reduction sauce I've made involves combining equal quantities of duck stock and "sweet" wine from Southwest France (e.g. Loupiac, Croix-St-Mont, Pacherenc du Vic Bihl), tossing in some chopped shallots and carrots and a bouquet garni (parsley, bay, thyme, white peppercorns), and reducing until syrupy. Strain, correct seasoning and serve. You wouldn't serve this with filet mignon, of course, but it's great with a seared scallop of foie gras atop some caramelized apple slices or drizzled around a pile of roasted wild mushrooms topped with slices of seared pepper-encrusted tuna.

Edited by carswell (log)
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Pour a bottle of fruity, not highly acidic and preferably unoaked red wine into a sauté pan. Add whole "warm" spices of your choosing; I typically use a few cloves, a star anise, a cinnamon stick and a few cardamon pods and sometimes throw in a dried chile pepper or two. Bring to a boil and reduce until thick (i.e. by 3/4 to 7/8). Strain and set aside. Put 2 or 3 tablespoons of sugar in a saucepan, add 3 tablespoons each of sherry vinegar and water and bring to a boil. Boil off the liquid over medium heat. Watching constantly and tilting the pan occasionally, allow the sugar to caramelize. As soon as the caramel turns golden, remove the pan from the heat and pour in the red wine reduction. Stir to dissolve. Although Chef Loivel doesn't, you can mount the sauce with butter if you find it too sharp; otherwise, it's fat free.

Another wine reduction sauce I've made involves combining equal quantities of duck stock and "sweet" wine from Southwest France (e.g. Loupiac, Croix-St-Mont, Pacherenc du Vic Bihl), tossing in some chopped shallots and carrots and a bouquet garni (parsley, bay, thyme, white peppercorns), and reducing until syrupy. Strain, correct seasoning and serve. You wouldn't serve this with filet mignon, of course, but it's great with a seared scallop of foie gras atop some caramelized apple slices or drizzled around a pile of roasted wild mushrooms topped with slices of seared pepper-encrusted tuna.

These sound great I'll try them, thanks! I sure miss Montreal. We once did the Christmas buffet at the Beaver Club. I have NEVER seen such a lavish display of fine food anywhere in my life!

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sadly I don't measure things out when I am cooking at home but the concept is pretty simple, this is something I make, its between a chineese and thai stew sorta that I use the borth as a reduced stock latter for meats.

Start by carmalizing couple cups of sugar, then add star anise, and cinnomen I woul say about 1/2 cup star anice 1 cup cinnomen sticks. You can also add cilantro styems. Now add hot water, if you use cold the sugar will harden, but that jsut meanas you have to wait for it to melt again. Now I add my meat of choice, I prefer either a whole duck or a good chunk of beef, something like a roast. Let this cook for like 10 hours add some hard boiled eggs and you have a great meal.

Now take the liquid, its sorta sweet sorta savory, and reduce it down after straining it and you have yourself a pretty cool asian style jus. Add some hot peppers if you want to spice it up a little.

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There is a type of reduction sauce called stratification. It is a simple way to make sauces by a series of rapid reductions. You start off with an acid, then you add a protein rich stock and then heavy cream, and, with whisking, allow the sauce to boil vigorously until many bubbles appear on its surface. From time time you stir this bubbling mixture with a wooden spoon until you catch a glimpse of the bottom of the pan. When you see the bottom, your sauce is finished and will adhere lightly to meat or fish.

The idea is the cream has evaporated, allowing the remaining butterfat, in the presence of protein and acid, to bind the sauce and make it silky. “The faster the

evaporation, the better the coagulation” is the rule for creating a sauce by

stratification. It takes less than 10 minutes to complete the entire process in

a heavy-bottomed pan, and the sauce will hold for quite a while.

The following example is not my recipe, but was taught to me many years ago by the late Gascon chef Jean-Louis Palladin when he was still in Gascony and had 2 stars from Michelin. He served it with scallops.

Tangerine Sauce

1/2 cups fresh tangerine juice

1/4 cup Fish Glaze, or 1 1/4 cups unsalted fish stock reduced by boiling to 1/4 cup

2 tablespoons demi-glace or 3/4 cup unsalted chicken stock reduced to 2 tbsp

1/2 cup heavy cream

Fresh lemon juice

n a small nonreactive saucepan, boil the tangerine juice until reduced to 1/3 cup.

Add the fish glaze and demi-glace. Bring to a boil; add the cream and boil vigorously without stirring for 5 to 7 minutes, until large bubbles appear on the surface and the sauce begins to bind. From time to time, test by stirring with a wooden spoon to see if the sauce has thickened. You should be able to glimpse the bottom of the saucepan for an instant. If the sauce is too sweet, adjust with a few drops of lemon juice and season to taste

If the sauce turns oily, you have reduced it too much; in this case add a tablespoon of water, and it will immediately smooth out. (At this point, the sauce can be held over warm water for up to 1 hour and reheated gently.)

If sauce is too strong tasting or too thin, swirl in bits of butter, on and off

the heat .

c\P. Wolfert, 1978, 1983,2005

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

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There is a  type of reduction sauce called  stratification. It is a simple way to make sauces by a series of rapid reductions. You start off with an acid, then you add a protein rich stock and then heavy cream, and, with whisking, allow the sauce to boil vigorously until many bubbles appear on its surface. From time time you stir this bubbling mixture with a wooden spoon until you catch a glimpse of the bottom of the pan. When you see the bottom, your sauce is finished and will adhere lightly to meat or fish.

The idea is the cream has evaporated, allowing the remaining butterfat, in the presence of protein and acid, to bind the sauce and make it silky. “The faster the

evaporation, the better the coagulation” is the rule for creating a sauce by

stratification. It takes less than 10 minutes to complete the entire process in

a heavy-bottomed pan, and the sauce will hold for quite a while.

The following example is not my recipe, but was taught to me many years ago by the late Gascon chef Jean-Louis Palladin when he was still in Gascony and had 2 stars from Michelin. He served it with scallops.

Tangerine Sauce

1/2 cups fresh tangerine juice

1/4 cup Fish Glaze, or 1 1/4 cups unsalted fish stock reduced by boiling to 1/4 cup

2 tablespoons demi-glace or 3/4 cup unsalted chicken stock reduced to 2 tbsp           

1/2 cup heavy cream

Fresh lemon juice

n a small nonreactive saucepan, boil the tangerine juice until reduced to 1/3 cup.

Add the fish glaze and demi-glace. Bring to a boil; add the cream and boil vigorously without stirring for 5 to 7 minutes, until large bubbles appear on the surface and the sauce begins to bind. From time to time, test by stirring with a wooden spoon to see if the sauce has thickened. You should be able to glimpse the bottom of the saucepan for an instant. If the sauce is too sweet, adjust with a few drops of lemon juice and season to taste

If the sauce turns oily, you have reduced it too much; in this case add a tablespoon of water, and it will immediately smooth out. (At this point, the sauce can be held over warm water for up to 1 hour and reheated gently.)

If sauce is too strong tasting or too thin, swirl in bits of butter, on and off

the heat .

c\P. Wolfert, 1978, 1983,2005

That looks nice and simple (usually the best sauces are) I like the tangerine twist. I wonder how it would work with lobster. I'll give it a go.

Thanks Paula!

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The following example is not my recipe, but was taught to me many years ago by the late Gascon chef Jean-Louis Palladin when he was still in Gascony and had 2 stars from Michelin. He served it with scallops.

Tangerine Sauce

1/2 cups fresh tangerine juice

1/4 cup Fish Glaze, or 1 1/4 cups unsalted fish stock reduced by boiling to 1/4 cup

2 tablespoons demi-glace or 3/4 cup unsalted chicken stock reduced to 2 tbsp           

1/2 cup heavy cream

Fresh lemon juice

We did something similar for our Petit paquats de St.Jacques recipe at school..but without the stock...scallops in filopastry-beggars purse with an orange sauce...

Orange sauce:

juice and zest of 2 oranges

1 shallot, chopped

100ml white wine

100ml cream

100g butter-unsalted

This will probably be more acidic because of the white wine...also lesser cream and absolutely no stock....The Tangerine sauce must be smooth!! It also has additional lemon juice!

We are supposed to emulsify..but I find that whisking it rigourously quickly over high heat works best for me...of course, my method is 'frowned upon'..but hey! there is nothing wrong with it!

I try to keep track of the orange family spawns..but how is tangerine different from orange? more sweet?

Edited by FaustianBargain (log)
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There is a  type of reduction sauce called  stratification. It is a simple way to make sauces by a series of rapid reductions. You start off with an acid, then you add a protein rich stock and then heavy cream, and, with whisking, allow the sauce to boil vigorously until many bubbles appear on its surface. From time time you stir this bubbling mixture with a wooden spoon until you catch a glimpse of the bottom of the pan. When you see the bottom, your sauce is finished and will adhere lightly to meat or fish.

The idea is the cream has evaporated, allowing the remaining butterfat, in the presence of protein and acid, to bind the sauce and make it silky. “The faster the

evaporation, the better the coagulation” is the rule for creating a sauce by

stratification. It takes less than 10 minutes to complete the entire process in

a heavy-bottomed pan, and the sauce will hold for quite a while.

The following example is not my recipe, but was taught to me many years ago by the late Gascon chef Jean-Louis Palladin when he was still in Gascony and had 2 stars from Michelin. He served it with scallops.

Tangerine Sauce

1/2 cups fresh tangerine juice

1/4 cup Fish Glaze, or 1 1/4 cups unsalted fish stock reduced by boiling to 1/4 cup

2 tablespoons demi-glace or 3/4 cup unsalted chicken stock reduced to 2 tbsp           

1/2 cup heavy cream

Fresh lemon juice

n a small nonreactive saucepan, boil the tangerine juice until reduced to 1/3 cup.

Add the fish glaze and demi-glace. Bring to a boil; add the cream and boil vigorously without stirring for 5 to 7 minutes, until large bubbles appear on the surface and the sauce begins to bind. From time to time, test by stirring with a wooden spoon to see if the sauce has thickened. You should be able to glimpse the bottom of the saucepan for an instant. If the sauce is too sweet, adjust with a few drops of lemon juice and season to taste

If the sauce turns oily, you have reduced it too much; in this case add a tablespoon of water, and it will immediately smooth out. (At this point, the sauce can be held over warm water for up to 1 hour and reheated gently.)

If sauce is too strong tasting or too thin, swirl in bits of butter, on and off

the heat .

c\P. Wolfert, 1978, 1983,2005

I have not heard of stratification. The example seems as if it would make a nice sauce, but I wonder if the scientific theory is completely correct. Or, that it is not much different than other reductions that contain cream, stock, and acid. It just seems that in such sauces, there is always a bonding of the the three acompanied with evaporation. Does the sauce share more in common with an emulsified sauce like a buerre blanc or hollandaise? Or am I missing something?

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No, you aren't missing a thing, This is the word used aboout 30 years ago on the eve of the nouvelle cuisine to explain a reduction sauce.

I had the great honor of studying with Andre Guillot who termed the word.

BTW It's a really good recipe.

Edited by Wolfert (log)

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

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My favorite reduction: I'm a bit loopy, I don't normally give this out. After over a year here what the hell, I've been given so much more. Some would also say Meh, your point?

I'm assuming we are not limited to beef. My favorite is a saffron cream for clams, works for any other seafood.

It is shallots about a dozen minced;

1 head of garlic sliced paper thin;

1 bunch of parsley chopped fine at the end to look pretty

1 large pinch saffron, hence the title

The broth from steaming clams, strained

1 cuo white wine

2 cups Hvy or Whipping cream

salt

black pepper

fresh grated nutmeg

fresh grated lemon rind and knob of butter and

a dash of paprika to finish.

Sweat the Shallots and Garlic until they start to take a little color add white wine, stir add parsley and saffron, reduce by half then add the cream and the rest of the herbs and tasting as you go. Reduce till you can make a line on the back of your spoon

It should complement the seafood not crowd or overpower it.

You have it right when they still ask for it after their plate is empty!

**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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