Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Wolfert

Moroccan Tagine Cooking

Recommended Posts

Hassouni, that is a helpful report.  

 

I thought I read somewhere that Paula has her lamb tagines, and kept her Rifi for chicken, etc.  My guess was that this is the tradition, which is interesting even if technically unnecessary.  I honestly don't remember where I read this, I could easily be conflating different reports (has Mourad weighed in on this???  I don't remember). 

 

Anyway, it's not exactly a worry -- there is SO no room in my situation for multiple tagines, and the one I've recently ordered will make two in a household of, presently, one person [reliably].  If I'm willing to accept an occasional lead exposure, then I suppose I can continue to use the other one . . . .

 

I did order a fish tagra along with the new tagine, which I admit was pure style, but the intention was to use it for a range of fish preparations -- for some reason I find those clay dishes really very beautiful, and since I was already paying for shipping and, uh, had broken the seal . . . .  However -- I don't want all my fish dishes to taste Moroccan, or even to ping charmoula when that wasn't the design; so we'll have to see how well the baking soda works with unglazed clay.  

 

<Obvs, I'm hungry for my new tagine, shoot.>


Edited by SLB (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright.  The Souss is in.  I soaked it last night, oiled-n-baked it this morning, and cooked a deliberately bland-ish potato dish in it tonight; the idea was to isolate the "earthy" flavor that is distinctive about unglazed Moroccan clay.  Re the Rifi, tagines.com notes:  "think mushrooms."   Me, I really like mushrooms, so . . . .

 

I didn't taste mushrooms, but I did experience a not-exactly-pleasant metallic taste.  I could not think what else could be producing this taste other than the clay, but it's true that my potatoes were as old as the hills, as were the shallots.  Stay tuned.  

 

Also, OMG was the unglazed-clay a bear to clean.  I did kind of burn up the bottom layer.  But it wasn't *that* burned . . . man!

 

It is beautiful, though, no complaints there.  The tagra was also beautiful, and so satisfyingly heavy; but was just too small for anything realistic.  I'm hoping that tagines.com lets me exchange it for the largest oval one. 

 

I'm doing a meat tagine next, I hope the metallic taste fades away.


Edited by SLB (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The souss is a champ. I feel like it's the cast iron of clay pots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Souss take on Rif style chicken and prunes and almonds.  With an SLB-style riff:  sour cherries were substituted for prunes, and slivered almonds were substituted for whole.  I have more dried fruit than I know what to do with, but I didn't happen to have any prunes, so . . . 

 

 

IMG_2365.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once again, I burnt the heck out of the bottom onion layer, and am anticipating an upper-body workout in getting it clean.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've scorched my bottom onion layer too, but oddly it never tastes burnt or bitter, does yours? In my case it's almost like intensely maillarded but not quite carbonized.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the bottom is not burnt black, but I can't scrape it off to eat, either.  It requires abrading off.  Possibly my "low" setting is just not low enough.  One thing, the iron flame tamers hold a LOT more heat than the flimsy aluminum one that you get at the hardware store.  So maybe that's the issue.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the bottom is not burnt black, but I can't scrape it off to eat, either.  It requires abrading off.  Possibly my "low" setting is just not low enough.  One thing, the iron flame tamers hold a LOT more heat than the flimsy aluminum one that you get at the hardware store.  So maybe that's the issue.  

 

I think we're experiencing the same thing or at least a similar phenomenon - I can scrape some of it off with crusty bread, but the rest requires abrading as you say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That happens to me too. The only time it doesn't is when I use the diffuser but then using a diffuser requires more time.

To scrape off the char without damaging the tagine get a plastic pan scraper. They are really good and won't scratch. I usually pour some warm water in the tagine and let it soak for a while before using the scraper. If the burnt bits are extra difficult to remove, I'll put a bit of baking soda in the water and leave for like an hour. Then after scraping, use 1 of those scrubbed designed for nonstick pans to clean it. This works for me wverytime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.  I've been using a diffuser on those burnt-bottom episodes; I may just have the flame too high.

 

Meanwhile, I've since made a beef tagine using the last short ribs that had been in my freezer all winter.  There was so much fat in the pan that nothing stuck at all!  So maybe I need to use more fat all around.  

 

I still haven't used the tagra, but I don't like to cook fish with a lot of fat and am worried that it's going to be a pain.  Also, the tagines.com tagras are just so small!  I finally received the largest one they have, and it's just . . .  sigh.  I don't get going to the effort to put a dish together only to end up with two bites of food.  I like to have leftovers!  But we'll see, maybe I can pack more in this pan than I think.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Food of Morocco, Lamb Tagine with Baby Spinach, Lemon, and olives (p 364).  Per Wolfert, except that I kept the Picholine olives whole, and I cooked the lamb 24 hours sous vide.  OK, 27 hours, 38 minutes, 13 seconds, but who's counting?

 

These shortcuts made the difference between sitting down to dinner at 3:00 am and sitting down to dinner at, say, 7:00 am.  It is always such a drag to be eating dinner when the sun is up.

 

 

tajine04212015.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×