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Best restaurant around Colmar


lizziee
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Au Fer Rouge - Lunch

Au Fer Rouge is a Michelin one star located in Colmar. It is situated in the middle of old town - a half walking area of twisting, turning cobble stone streets with loads of tourists from Germany, Switzerland and France.

The streets are lined with "kitchie" souvenir shops and food joints serving "Alsatian specialties."

Patrick Fulgraff, the chef, was the president of the young restaurateurs of Europe. The group is dedicated to preserving fine dining, but now he is too old (over 35) to remain a member.

The restaurant is in an old house with lots of antiques, wood and a planked ceiling. We knew we were on our way to Illhauersen for dinner so we were intent on keeping lunch simple and light.

With our champagne, a first amuse of salmon tartar - light and full of flavor.

2nd amuse--a mousse of tomato served in a long, cylindrical glass - it seems as if many of the chefs are using the "shot glass" for presentation

1st course--3 belon oysters served in a frothy shallot, chive and cream sauce--nice and interesting.

2nd course--risotto with parmesan cheese with tiny mussels, small broccoli fleurettes and black trumpet mushrooms ringing the risotto - good and a bit different.

3rd course--on a dish that looked like a wave, a saddle of lamb, perfectly seasoned, with tarragon sauce, a small round of potatoes anna, tomato confit, sautéed sweet peppers and black trumpet mushrooms-- again solid cooking with just enough flair.

Wine:

White--Alsatian Reisling, Grand Cru, Kanzlerberg, 1998, by Lorenz--clean, fresh

Red--Wolfberger, 1999--a pinot noir--this was a bad wine that should not have been served - nothing technically wrong. According to my husband, they just don't grow pinot the right way---the terroir isn't Burgundy.

If you are in Colmar, looking for a place to eat good food in nice surroundings with a professional service staff that is removed from the hordes of tourists, Au Fer Rouge is a good choice. One problem is that parking is a nightmare near the old town. All those tourists need a place to park.

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  • 2 years later...

Hello all,

I need your opinion about the above topic. I have thought about Auberge de l'Ill but I'm hasitating as my experience with 3-stars restaurants is medicore (I've found them boring, with one exception - Troisgros), and since l'Auberge is a very old institute.

I'm looking for an ultimate restaurant with creative food (it might be also traditional-creative, not fusion). Budget is unlimited.

Thanks,

Yossi

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It's been a few years, but we do have warm memories of the Auberge de l'Ill. We stayed at the inn and ate at the restaurant on our first night in Alsace. Jet lag and intervening 5 years contribute to disrecollection of details, but we do remember a marvelous time with a very satisfying meal of heightend (as you would expect) countryside specialities. We would go back in a hearbeat if we weren't so currently enamored of Italy. We also thought Au Crocodile would be worth a try as well, based on some "take-out" we got to provision our canal boat.

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We also had a delightful experience and the gracious host greeted each of us at our tables while we had our apertifs on the terrace. I only wish we could have dined outdoors.

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly....MFK Fisher

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I have spent a lot of time dining in that specific region (many recent winters I have spent 3 weeks at a time there) so I can offer some opinions.

I at at Auberge de L'Ill three years ago and had a most disappointing meal, boring and over-rated. It was actually the least good food I've had in that region, and a few dishes tasted like what you might get on an airplane - I mean, uninspired and mediocre in quality. I share your thoughts about 3-star restaurants, but I generally like to try one every now and then. After Auberge de L'Ill, I may just give that up altogether. But, the region is full of great dining (and that's one of things that made the meal all the more unusual). On to the happier places...

A restaurant that I have come to love over the years is in the village of Lapoutroie, perhaps ten or fifteen minutes above Colmar: the Hotel and Restaurant du Faude. They have always had a menu that includes sumptuously good local specialties, including Trout and Truitelles that they catch from a stream on the property at the moment you place your order, and they've also always featured some very creative gastronomy (boneless pigeon with foie gras and truffles, etc.). I learned of it through a conversation at my hotel in Strasbourg with a Frenchman who was also on an eating tour of the region; he had eaten there the previous evening and thought it was one of the best meals he'd ever had. I went the next night, and have become a regular, eating my way very happily through the menu.

Last year they re-did the place, and separated the menus into two different restaurants, the "Faude Gourmet" (obvious which that is) and the "Grenier Welche" which serves the local cuisine. I have not been since this change, but I have heard from other eGulleteers who go every year that the food at both restaurants is even better than ever.

I've posted dozens of photos of the foods here:

Faude food photos

Of all the places I've tried in the region, Faude just has the best food, and I keep going back there night after night. Other places are okay, but it just seemed pointless to go back to them when Faude was an option.

If you're willing to venture to the northern end of Alsace, that is to say just north of Strasbourg, there are 2 restaurants that I could recommend there (with photos as well).

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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Thanks Markk,

the photos are superbe. Seems as a very interesting restaurant.

I'm planning to have a dinner at "Au Crocodile" at Strasbourg few days before I arrive to Colmar, so your other two recommendation are more than welcome!

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I have spent a lot of time dining in that specific region (many recent winters I have spent 3 weeks at a time there) so I can offer some opinions.

A restaurant that I have come to love over the years is in the village of Lapoutroie, perhaps ten or fifteen minutes above Colmar: the Hotel and Restaurant du Faude. 

OMG, I'm salivating!!!

My husband's cousin lives in a village near Strasbourg and we dined very well indeed when we visited her (both at her home and dining around the area), but I'll have to write this one down for the next time we visit!

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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North, up just past Strasbourg, I've had superb meals (2 each) at the restaurants Le Cerf in Marlenheim (Michelin 2-stars, and very well deserved), and the restaurant Au Chasseur in nearby Birkenwald. I was at Le Cerf in December of 2002 during perhaps the greatest truffle season ever, and the photos are of the Truffle Dinner. (That year, come to think of it, Au Chasseur had truffles too.)

Both are great. Chasseur is a smaller, simpler place (in the middle of nowhere, and the silence is amazing), but its cellar is truly superb, and they will serve you a meal fit for a king with delicious wines to match, based on the two times I've been there. If you do go, let them suggest what you eat and drink; they'll ply you with magnificent local whites to start, and they have great strengths and finds in both Red Bordeaux and Burgundy.

And if you're disenchanted with 3-star dining, you might want to do what I did and check out a 2-star place, which is what got me to Le Cerf (that, and the Truffle Menu). These might be the places on their way up, hoping to earn that third star, who haven't yet become complacent and decided to coast on their reputations. (Well, I don't know if that's how it works, but I can tell you that Le Cerf is a magnificent place to dine.)

Hope you enjoy these photos as well:

Le Cerf Truffle Dinner photos

Au Chasseur dinner photos

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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I don't know how it works either, and maybe it's just that some two stars concetrate on solid food that tastes good, but in spite of my interest in creative food, many of my most successful and memorable meals in France have been at two star restaurants. Frequenly it's were the vaue is greatest as well.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Thanks Markk,

the photos are superbe. Seems as a very interesting restaurant.

I'm planning to have a dinner at "Au Crocodile" at Strasbourg few days before I arrive to Colmar, so your other two recommendation are more than welcome!

I've eaten 3 times at "Au Crocodile" and I have been disappointed three times. The last time I've been (that was just before they lost their 3rd star, actually), I could not believe how low the *food* quality was. It was an "inventive" menu with asian and middle eastern notes. I had never had such a tasteless and "sandy" hummus. The lamb bricks were cold, dessert simply unedible. Very sad ...

I might have been unlucky 3 times and I'm sure many people did have great moments there but I had not.

Though, if you want inventive food, try "Serge and Co" in Schiltigheim. They've just got their first star and food is spectacular. Very surprising, fantastic use of spices and quite accomplished dishes.

Another restaurant not to be missed if *food* is what you're interested in is "Le Pont aux Chats", rue de la Krutenau in Strasbourg. I have been few times to this place and it's still amazing .... check this thread

My 2p.

"Je préfère le vin d'ici à l'au-delà"

Francis Blanche

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Well, this may be a long-ish tale, but this seems like exactly the place to tell it, what with the general opinion of 3-star restaurants here.

A few years ago I was having my tenth dinner in a row at Faude (photos above), just because I love the place and it's my "base" restaurant in the region. We had been considering trying a 3-star restaurant that trip, debating between Auberge de L'Ill and Crocodile, but for all the reasons expressed in this thread, weren't sure. We had been told a few days earlier (by a very famous winemaker we were visiting) that Auberge de L'Ill was a "must", and so we had made a reservation there for later in the week.

Well, dining behind us at Faude was a French couple in their 70's (I would say) who it turns out were from Strasbourg, an hour away. They looked quite well to do, and they looked like they were no strangers to fine dining, and they were indeed having the Gastronomic tasting menu. And, they did something that while it might be considered "odd" for Europe, is something that I've noticed happens a lot the world over in restaurants where the food is really great - they struck up a conversation with us, complete strangers, at the next table. (I have come to realize that when the food in a restaurant is really, really good, it sort of breaks the ice and promotes strangers to become friendly.) It was also the case that the chef had come out to visit with me, and that too served as an ice-breaker for them, to ask "How is it that you know him so well?"

Anyway, we got to talking, all about food. They were indeed gastronomes, and they had come to Faude for the weekend because they'd heard about it and wanted to sample the fare (in that it's an hour from Strasbourg, it might not necessitate a weekend stay, but they went for it). And in fact, they were getting ready for a two week trip to the Orient.

Anyway, we decided to ask them about Auberge de L'Ill and Crocodile, and they had lots to say. They told me in no uncertain terms that Auberge de L'Ill was terrible and had been coasting on its reputation for way too long, and that as they actually lived in Strasbourg, were very familiar with Crocodile, and thought that it was terribly overrated, and just not very good. But then they added that the one 3-star restaurant that was great, and that they wholeheartedly recommended was Buerehiesel, just on the outskirts of Strasbourg. They said that the food was genuinely sensational.

Well, on the one hand it sounded like they knew what they were talking about. On the other hand, we had a reservation for two days later at Auberge de L'Ill... so we asked ourselves, "whom do we trust?" - a complete stranger we met at a restaurant, or a very famous winemaker in the region?

And so we went with the latter and kept our reservation at Auberge de L'Ill, where we had a most disappointing, very sad meal, all food-wise, although the setting is beautiful. I think that all of the comments the winemike made about Crocodile's food would apply here as well.

But that made us think that perhaps this woman knew exactly what she was talking about. We haven't made it to Buerehiesel yet, but this seemed like a good time and place to tell this story and suggest it to anybody looking to try a 3-star in that region, and having doubts about it at the same time.

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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Well, this may be a long-ish tale, but this seems like exactly the place to tell it, what with the general opinion of 3-star restaurants here.

A few years ago I was having my tenth dinner in a row at Faude (photos above), just because I love the place and it's my "base" restaurant in the region.  We had been considering trying a 3-star restaurant that trip, debating between Auberge de L'Ill and Crocodile, but for all the reasons expressed in this thread, weren't sure.  We had been told a few days earlier (by a very famous winemaker we were visiting) that Auberge de L'Ill was a "must", and so we had made a reservation there for later in the week.

Well, dining behind us at Faude was a French couple in their 70's (I would say) who it turns out were from Strasbourg, an hour away.  They looked quite well to do, and they looked like they were no strangers to fine dining, and they were indeed having the Gastronomic tasting menu.  And, they did something that while it might be considered "odd" for Europe, is something that I've noticed happens a lot the world over in restaurants where the food is really great - they struck up a conversation with us, complete strangers, at the next table.  (I have come to realize that when the food in a restaurant is really, really good, it sort of breaks the ice and promotes strangers to become friendly.)  It was also the case that the chef had come out to visit with me, and that too served as an ice-breaker for them, to ask "How is it that you know him so well?"

Anyway, we got to talking, all about food.  They were indeed gastronomes, and they had come to Faude for the weekend because they'd heard about it and wanted to sample the fare (in that it's an hour from Strasbourg, it might not necessitate a weekend stay, but they went for it).  And in fact, they were getting ready for a two week trip to the Orient.

Anyway, we decided to ask them about Auberge de L'Ill and Crocodile, and they had lots to say.  They told me in no uncertain terms that Auberge de L'Ill was terrible and had been coasting on its reputation for way too long, and that as they actually lived in Strasbourg, were very familiar with Crocodile, and thought that it was terribly overrated, and just not very good.  But then they added that the one 3-star restaurant that was great, and that they wholeheartedly recommended was Buerehiesel, just on the outskirts of Strasbourg.  They said that the food was genuinely sensational.

Well, on the one hand it sounded like they knew what they were talking about.  On the other hand, we had a reservation for two days later at Auberge de L'Ill... so we asked ourselves, "whom do we trust?" - a complete stranger we met at a restaurant, or a very famous winemaker in the region?

And so we went with the latter and kept our reservation at Auberge de L'Ill, where we had a most disappointing, very sad meal, all food-wise, although the setting is beautiful.    I think that all of the comments the winemike made about Crocodile's food would apply here as well.

But that made us think that perhaps this woman knew exactly what she was talking about.  We haven't made it to Buerehiesel yet, but this seemed like a good time and place to tell this story and suggest it to anybody looking to try a 3-star in that region, and having doubts about it at the same time.

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Well, this may be a long-ish tale, but this seems like exactly the place to tell it, what with the general opinion of 3-star restaurants here.

A few years ago I was having my tenth dinner in a row at Faude (photos above), just because I love the place and it's my "base" restaurant in the region.  We had been considering trying a 3-star restaurant that trip, debating between Auberge de L'Ill and Crocodile, but for all the reasons expressed in this thread, weren't sure.  We had been told a few days earlier (by a very famous winemaker we were visiting) that Auberge de L'Ill was a "must", and so we had made a reservation there for later in the week.

Well, dining behind us at Faude was a French couple in their 70's (I would say) who it turns out were from Strasbourg, an hour away.  They looked quite well to do, and they looked like they were no strangers to fine dining, and they were indeed having the Gastronomic tasting menu.  And, they did something that while it might be considered "odd" for Europe, is something that I've noticed happens a lot the world over in restaurants where the food is really great - they struck up a conversation with us, complete strangers, at the next table.  (I have come to realize that when the food in a restaurant is really, really good, it sort of breaks the ice and promotes strangers to become friendly.)  It was also the case that the chef had come out to visit with me, and that too served as an ice-breaker for them, to ask "How is it that you know him so well?"

Anyway, we got to talking, all about food.  They were indeed gastronomes, and they had come to Faude for the weekend because they'd heard about it and wanted to sample the fare (in that it's an hour from Strasbourg, it might not necessitate a weekend stay, but they went for it).  And in fact, they were getting ready for a two week trip to the Orient.

Anyway, we decided to ask them about Auberge de L'Ill and Crocodile, and they had lots to say.  They told me in no uncertain terms that Auberge de L'Ill was terrible and had been coasting on its reputation for way too long, and that as they actually lived in Strasbourg, were very familiar with Crocodile, and thought that it was terribly overrated, and just not very good.  But then they added that the one 3-star restaurant that was great, and that they wholeheartedly recommended was Buerehiesel, just on the outskirts of Strasbourg.  They said that the food was genuinely sensational.

Well, on the one hand it sounded like they knew what they were talking about.  On the other hand, we had a reservation for two days later at Auberge de L'Ill... so we asked ourselves, "whom do we trust?" - a complete stranger we met at a restaurant, or a very famous winemaker in the region?

And so we went with the latter and kept our reservation at Auberge de L'Ill, where we had a most disappointing, very sad meal, all food-wise, although the setting is beautiful.    I think that all of the comments the winemike made about Crocodile's food would apply here as well.

But that made us think that perhaps this woman knew exactly what she was talking about.  We haven't made it to Buerehiesel yet, but this seemed like a good time and place to tell this story and suggest it to anybody looking to try a 3-star in that region, and having doubts about it at the same time.

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I took a gastronomic trip to Alsace in September 2003 and ate at the following starred restaurants

Auberge de l'Ill, 3 stars

Le Cerf, 2 stars

Auberge du Cheval Blanc, 2 stars

Au Crocodile, 2 stars

Hotel Bareiss, 2 stars (Baiserbronn Tonnbach, Germany)

It is difficult to put them in order except to say that Crocodile was the least favorite. If pressed, though, I think I would pick Cheval Blanc as best. I returned to Cheval Blanc last June and stayed 4 days in guest rooms on the restaurant property and was impressed again. It is well north of Strausbourg, in Lembach. Do a search and you will find their website.

Marlenheim, home to le Cerf, is an easy maybe 25 minute drive to the west of Strausbourg. I would definitely drop Crocodile and reschedule to le Cerf. They have a website too where you can view the menu. If you do not mind an hour's drive or so from Strausbourg, go to Cheval Blanc.

Across the Rhine in the Black Forest, the restaurant at the Hotel Bareiss was truly fabulous, easily the equivalent or better than the French restaurants listed here. I guess it is 40 or 50 miles from Strausbourg but you have to go through some winding mountain roads to get there.

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But then they added that the one 3-star restaurant that was great, and that they wholeheartedly recommended was Buerehiesel, just on the outskirts of Strasbourg. They said that the food was genuinely sensational.

I have to agree here. The most sensational food in Strasbourg must be at Buerehiesel. I was (and still am) a big fan of this place but having moved out of Alsace makes it hard to get back there regularly.... It has been stated on this board and I wholeheartedly agree : the frog legs are probably the best in the world. I had this dish at least 40 times. I can't get tired of it.

Restaurant experience and recommendation is a very personal matter, though. The comparison might not be very good, but it's a bit like wine recommendation: I trust the recommendations from people I *know*. I mean I know their taste...

Of course, I try, here and there, something people gave kudos to and I am (sometimes) disappointed and when I report it to my "trusted sources", they tell me I've been stupid and should have asked them....

Auberge de l'Ill, 3 stars

Le Cerf, 2 stars

Auberge du Cheval Blanc, 2 stars

Au Crocodile, 2 stars

Hotel Bareiss, 2 stars (Baiserbronn Tonnbach, Germany)

I have not been to Hotel Bareiss but from the other places, I preferred "Auberge du Cheval Blanc" too. I have to say that Buerehiesel is in another league, though. Way above...

Cheers

Mike

"Je préfère le vin d'ici à l'au-delà"

Francis Blanche

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If you are considering a trip to Baiersbronn, Bareiss is extremely good, but the Schwarzwaldstube at the "Traube-Tonbach" is considered one of the very greatest restaurants in the world.

I have had half-a-dozen or so meals there over the last 15 years, none of them less than stellar, some almost beyond credence.

I can unreservedly recommend the Cheval Blanc, too, if you want to remain in France. I had a week or so there, some years ago, learning how to cook (better). Their cellar is amazing.

Still haven't been to Burehiesel, but everything I have heard is encouraging (except, perhaps, their prices).

Charles Milton Ling

Vienna, Austria

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  • 2 weeks later...

My husband and I are the folks MarkK mentioned who also love Faude, and so I'll second his recommendation there -- especially for the Gourmet restaurant. The lower cost, regional one is a bit more variable, although that is where you will get the very very fresh trout and baby trout salad. If you are going in summer, the venison is also highly recommended from that menu, which last year came smothered in chanterelles.

The Gourmet menu is consistently excellent. In addition, Chantal Baldinger has put together an excellent, extensive wine list.

Just wish we were going again this year, but it's not to be.

Another place I quite liked was the one star "Table du Gourmet" in Riquewihr.

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L'Arnsbourg and Schwarzwaldstube are both fantastic Michelin three star restaurants, but are somewhat far from Colmar.

L'Arnsbourg is close to the German border up in the Vosges, about a 2 hour drive from Colmar I think. I had lunch there in June, 2004. The location is wonderful, situated alongside a little brook right in the middle of a forested area. The food was exceptional, quite light, with excellent local produce. A great aspect of this place for me was that it is completely non-smoking!

The Schwarzwaldstube, already mentioned in this thread, is in Baiersbronn, near Freudenstadt in the Black Forest in Germany. It is probably a 2 1/2 hour drive from Colmar. I had dinner here, also in June 2004, while staying in the hotel that houses the restaurant, Hotel Traube Tonbach. The hotel is located on the slope of a picturesque valley; rooms and the restaurant have great views of the Black Forest landscape; and the hotel has nice indoor and outdoor pools. The food at the Schwarzwaldstube is basically French inspired, although there were some local Black Forest touches. I think I enjoyed my meal here even more than at L'Arensburg. Service was really good and friendly. Wine pairings were exceptional.

Unfortunately, I do not have my notes handy as I write this reply, so I cannot give a detailed description of my meals at these two restaurants.

On a less exalted (and much less expensive) level, I've enjoyed meals at JY's (June, 2003) and Chez Hansi (summer, 2000) right in Colmar. JY's is run by JY Schillinger, the son of the Schillinger who ran the eponymous two star restaurant that was destroyed by fire some years ago (and also took the chef's life). The old Schillinger's had delicious food. JY's is certainly not in the same class, but does a very good job with alsatian specialties and also is quite creative. The location is nice, in an old picturesque building situated alongside a river in the southern end of Colmar.

Chez Hansi is directly in the center of Colmar in an old half timbered building. It served typical alsatian food and has good wine. Very informal, but the food is tasty and hearty.

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We were in Alsace two years ago and dined at L'Arnsbourg, Auberge de l'Ill and Buerehiesel.

I thought L'Arnsbourg was far and away the best, in a class by itself. An absolutely stunning, unforgettable dinner.

Auberge de l"Ill was a revisit.In 1965 we stayed up at Trois Epis for a week and drove down to the Auberge six straight nights and went through the entire menu. Today the place is unrecognizable but still very good, not in L'Arnsbourg's class , but outstanding dishes and wonderful presentation.

Buerehiesel I thought was absolutely pedestrian. Nothing. How it ever got 3 stars I cant imagine. I would give it one star maximum.I have plenty of company in this opinion.

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Buerehiesel I thought was absolutely pedestrian. Nothing. How it ever got 3 stars I cant imagine. I would give it one star maximum.I have plenty of company in this opinion.

Well, I think you disliked what you have been served at Buerehiesel and I'm sorry about that but stating "how it ever got 3 stars, I can't imagine" ... shows you have not been there frequently or that you do not understand what Antoine Westermann serves in his restaurant. Or simply that you do not like the style ?

Cheers,

Michael.

"Je préfère le vin d'ici à l'au-delà"

Francis Blanche

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks:

A great thank you for Markk. Faude was great. Superbe. The only thing I would upgrade in this restaurant were the deserts - which were good - but at the level of the rest of the meal. We toook the tasting menu accompanied by a Gewurz from Domaine Weinbach (cuvee Theo) which was an ultimate experience.

Thanks for Winemike - Serge and Co was also a good restaurant - although not as good as the Faude. Our mistake was that we took there the tasting menu, which is not representative and not deep enough. I think that eating "a la carte" would have made us happier.

My own recommendation for you is visiting Domaine Weinbach at Keysersberg (near Lapoutroie) - they make excellent Alsatian wine (esp. Gewurz) in reasonable prices (although the prices are not low). It is not far from the Faude.

Chantal, the wife of the chef Thiery, who took us in guests - was very pleasnt and we had a long discussion about wines from all abroad France, and we promised to visit her again.

She remebered you (=Markk) of course...

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  • 7 months later...

Hello yossi and co.

I'm going to Strasbourg and the area surrounding it this coming week. I have reservations at Serge and Co. and L'Arnsbourg, but will probably cancel L'Arnsbourg due to travel difficulty (I'm limited to rail and foot)...

I've read over your comments and suggestions. Restaurant du Faude seems to be popular, as well, Le Cerf, Auberge de Chevel Blanc, R. Bareiss, and Scwartzelstube. Any recent visits/comments/updates/advice?

Thanks!

U.E.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

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ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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