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Salt fish head and doufu soup,


Ben Hong
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Irwin, I was trying to transliterate what we call the fermented salt fish that we are all talking about.  "Moi herng, or moi heng" roughly means "fermented aromatic" . The moi heng treatment really, really intensifies the aroma (stinkiness) of the salt fish. At a stage of the salting and preserving process, the fish is allowed to do a controlled putrefaction. The result is the intensely "aromatic" product that encourages Chines homeboys to eat bowls and bowls of rice :laugh: . It has nothing to do with species, as any fish can be given the treatment.

Ben:

Thanks for the information. What I'm still curious about is what varieties of Salt Fish are the ones that are sold directly while standing on their heads in hardened salt at the Hong Kong Salted Fish stalls in all the Markets. They are generally more expensive and aromatic then the other Salt Fish and "Thread-Fin" are only available occasionally at a premium price standing regally in Salt.

All the Salted Dried Fish are sold from different stall's then those Fish cut up and sold packed in Oil or various types of fermented or spicy variations. I understand that the selections available in Canada are more extensive then what is available in the States. What I personally miss the most are "Hawkers" selling "Stinky Bean Curd" that my Children watched for daily as a treat in Hong Kong.

Irwin

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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How COULD you! Irwin, at this hour and when there is no way I can ever taste stinky dofu here on the Canadian prairies. :angry: ( Dej throwing a tantrum)

It's been 47 years.........................................Wonder if I would still enjoy it...

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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How COULD you! Irwin, at this hour and when there is no way I can ever taste stinky dofu here on the Canadian prairies. :angry: ( Dej throwing a tantrum)

It's been 47 years.........................................Wonder if I would still enjoy it...

Dejah:

The taste for "Stinky Beancurd" once acquired is always a mouth watering treat. Just imagine the effect it would have in your "Manitoba" heart of the Canadian prairie. Just think about firing up a Wok with a Kerosene Burner with Hot Peanut Oil used only for frying your Bean Curd Treat with the slices of Tofu being immersed into the hot oil with that one of a kind fragrant aroma. Brings tears to my eyes and growls to my stomach. I have only indulged 2 times in the last 10 years by insisting friends have it freshly canned [to hide the smell] with the red chili sauce from a Hong Kong Hawker. If I convince any one to bring me some again I will send some to Brandon. Why isn't anyone making this delicacy in Toronto or Vancouver. I bet it would sell well in Flushing, New York located near the street side Kabob Stand.

I mean if "Durian" is available year round in Seattle, why not Stinky Bean Curd. Is there any ventilation system that will do the job?

Irwin :wacko:

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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How COULD you! Irwin, at this hour and when there is no way I can ever taste stinky dofu here on the Canadian prairies. :angry: ( Dej throwing a tantrum)

It's been 47 years.........................................Wonder if I would still enjoy it...

Dejah:

If I convince any one to bring me some again I will send some to Brandon. Why isn't anyone making this delicacy in Toronto or Vancouver. I bet it would sell well in Flushing, New York located near the street side Kabob Stand.

Irwin :wacko:

Irwin, If you sent me some chow dufu, you'd be my hero for life!

Might be a way to get rid of unwanted neighbors. :hmmm:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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How COULD you! Irwin, at this hour and when there is no way I can ever taste stinky dofu here on the Canadian prairies. :angry: ( Dej throwing a tantrum)

It's been 47 years.........................................Wonder if I would still enjoy it...

Dejah:

The taste for "Stinky Beancurd" once acquired is always a mouth watering treat. Just imagine the effect it would have in your "Manitoba" heart of the Canadian prairie. Just think about firing up a Wok with a Kerosene Burner with Hot Peanut Oil used only for frying your Bean Curd Treat with the slices of Tofu being immersed into the hot oil with that one of a kind fragrant aroma. Brings tears to my eyes and growls to my stomach. I have only indulged 2 times in the last 10 years by insisting friends have it freshly canned [to hide the smell] with the red chili sauce from a Hong Kong Hawker. If I convince any one to bring me some again I will send some to Brandon. Why isn't anyone making this delicacy in Toronto or Vancouver. I bet it would sell well in Flushing, New York located near the street side Kabob Stand.

I mean if "Durian" is available year round in Seattle, why not Stinky Bean Curd. Is there any ventilation system that will do the job?

Irwin :wacko:

Actually, there is a way to make your own stinky tofu at home...... but your neighbour will hate you for that. I read in a food magazine about using old bamboo roots, sesame, black pepper, and juices from fermented vegetables. You need to boil the juices and add the bamboo, then stir in some freshly grounded sesame and pepper. Once the "marinade" is done, soak the tofu in it for 7-8 hours.

If anyone is interested in trying it, I would try to find more extensive recipes in Hong Kong Yahoo. Of course, I am going back this year to get more stinky tofu. :smile:

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How COULD you! Irwin, at this hour and when there is no way I can ever taste stinky dofu here on the Canadian prairies. :angry: ( Dej throwing a tantrum)

It's been 47 years.........................................Wonder if I would still enjoy it...

Dejah:

The taste for "Stinky Beancurd" once acquired is always a mouth watering treat. Just imagine the effect it would have in your "Manitoba" heart of the Canadian prairie. Just think about firing up a Wok with a Kerosene Burner with Hot Peanut Oil used only for frying your Bean Curd Treat with the slices of Tofu being immersed into the hot oil with that one of a kind fragrant aroma. Brings tears to my eyes and growls to my stomach. I have only indulged 2 times in the last 10 years by insisting friends have it freshly canned [to hide the smell] with the red chili sauce from a Hong Kong Hawker. If I convince any one to bring me some again I will send some to Brandon. Why isn't anyone making this delicacy in Toronto or Vancouver. I bet it would sell well in Flushing, New York located near the street side Kabob Stand.

I mean if "Durian" is available year round in Seattle, why not Stinky Bean Curd. Is there any ventilation system that will do the job?

Irwin :wacko:

Actually, there is a way to make your own stinky tofu at home...... but your neighbour will hate you for that. I read in a food magazine about using old bamboo roots, sesame, black pepper, and juices from fermented vegetables. You need to boil the juices and add the bamboo, then stir in some freshly grounded sesame and pepper. Once the "marinade" is done, soak the tofu in it for 7-8 hours.

If anyone is interested in trying it, I would try to find more extensive recipes in Hong Kong Yahoo. Of course, I am going back this year to get more stinky tofu. :smile:

Yuki:

There are many types of "Stinky Tofu's" available either in jars or home made, but none come close to the slices of pre-blanched in oil prepared by Hawkers in Hong Kong. These are Slices of the fermented shaped loafs that are lightly fried to keep their shape until put again into hot oil until browned and served to order.

I have friends who have tried making this from different types of fresh packaged "Tofu" but somehow it doesn't hold it shape nor have the "Aroma' of the real deal. I know of very few things that are as effective in inundating as large a area as quickly and effectively as street fried "Stinky Bean Curd" could be that the "Curd" stands for "Curdled". I imagine that there is a place in Hong Kong that prepares and sets up the Stinky Bean Curd for the Hawkers to peddle as there is little variation in the finished product sold everywhere in Hong Kong.

Today when I went looking for "Durian" I wound up with fresh "Rubitan" [spelling ?] first time I saw this in Seattle.

Irwin :cool: [keeps my eyes from tearing]

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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What is rubitan? or is that rambutan? The "hairy lycee"?

I haven't been able to get durian past my nose! I promised myself I will REALLY try again this summer. My mouth waters everytime someone tries to describe how wonderful durian tastes. I've even tried durian candy. My mouth just clamps shut and my nose turns into itself. (Think of someone gurning) Hubby handled it ( the candy) but we will both scrounge up the strength this summer for the real thing.

BTW, we have 3 neighbors, 2 on the west side and one on the east side who have sold their homes since last week. When did this talk of stinky dofu start? :unsure::shock::rolleyes::laugh:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Do rambutans/durian/stinky tofu all go well with salted fish?

Just trying to help things along!

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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How are you thinking about combining rambutan with salted fish?

We generally enjoy Salted Fish with sides of Black Jellied Sesame, Macau Curried Puffs or Egg Tarts. [All introduced to Asia by the Portuguese]

Rambutan [originally spelled wrong] was something that was available fresh this week that I never saw before except frozen in local Asian stores.

If any fruit was designated to be served with Salt Fish or Stinky Bean Curd I nominate "Durian". Rambutan deserves being savored all by itself due to it's rare appearance fresh. Something like the family gathering we had this year when for the first time we were able to buy "Tiny Seed Lychee's" in Seattle. That was pure fruit bliss, brought tears to my daughter since she had only dreamed about then for 30 years, now shared them with her three children.

Dejah:

Today I tried a delicious "Durian Candy" and a "Durian Mooncake" that were both very special and delicious. PM me your address and I'll send some for you to enjoy. "Stinky Tofu" if and when available requires special packing to eliminate the fragrance. [Hah]

Irwin :biggrin:

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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I found that the dried salted fish sold in America is always a bit too dry. And they are quite hard to handle.

I like salted fish that's immersed in oil sold in jars. In California, I found that there are many brands of salted fish using Meckerel. I now use it pretty much exclusively. These salted Meckerels maintain a good amount of moisture and fragrant.

Edited by hzrt8w (log)
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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