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No bake Cheesecake


isabellerossetti
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I recently posted this. Heres a recipe from Philadelphia Cream Cheese cookbook "Cheesecakes".

No-Bake Cheesecake:

1 envelop unflavored gelatin

1/4 c. cold water

bloom together

soften in mixer:

8 oz. cream cheese

1/2 c. sugar

then add:

3/4 c. milk

1/4 c. lemon juice

Heat gelatin to melt, incorportate into you cheesecake batter. Fold into that:

1 c. whipped cream

You can add some lemon zest or orange zest if you like. You could cut back a little more on the sugar if you want, just make sure your cheese is smooth before adding your liquids.

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No one knows how to make this better! :biggrin:

No-bake cheesecake

By Christopher Kimball/ Kitchen Detective

Friday, July 30, 2004

The Internet is flush with recipes for No-Bake Cheesecake made with ingredients such as store-bought graham cracker piecrust, Cool Whip, and a box of lemon Jell-O. Not willing to use "convenience" ingredients, we wondered if we could make a no-bake cheesecake from scratch, one that we would really want to eat. After all, the idea is appealing, especially during a hot summer.

a perfect, tested recipe follows ... :laugh:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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  • 7 months later...

Volunteered to make a cake for a friend of mine...cause i always volunteer, much to the chagrin of my wife. She wants a cheesecake. Sure, no problem. "Can you make THIS cheesecake" She hands me a recipe that looks a bit screwy. I'm going to make it but it needs a bit of help, improvement maybe. Here's the recipe:

Cream cheese 1 lb.

Sugar 3.5 oz

Vanilla 1Tbsp.

Egg yolks 3

Sugar 1 oz

Gelatin(gelee bavaroise) 3 Tbsp.

White chocolate(melted) 4.5 oz

heavy cream 1 pint

Raspberries 1pint

Cream first three ingredients.

Whip yolks and sugar until light and fluffy.

Mix melted white chocolate with cream cheese mixture.

Dissolve gelatin in water, blend into yolk mixture.

Combine cheese mixture with yolk mixture.

Whip heavy cream to stiff peaks, fold into cheese/yolk mixture.

Fold in raspberries.

Scrape into prepared pan and refrigerate until set.

Ok. I've set lots of stuff with gelatin but i can honestly say i've never made a "no bake" cheesecake. i just always figured that was cheating and i really like a well baked cheesecake. Anyway, there are about four things that jump out at me as potential problems:

1. yolks and sugar whipped. I know at least 2 of the women at this get together are pregnant. i think it would be rude to make something with raw egg product. Besides that, i looked around and couldn't find one recipe that called for any egg in a no bake cake. If there IS a reason for this i'd like to know. Omit?

2. gelee bavaroise. I actually have this. its instant gelatin. Got it from Assoline and Ting. Does this need to be dissolved in water? When i make bavarians i usually just stir it into my pastry cream when its warm.

3. i'll probably whip the cream to soft peaks.

4. There is no mention of a crust for this cake. I have two ideas: oreo cookie crumb or macadamia crust. life is too short for graham crackers.

This recipe looks like it will fit into a 10" springform.

i would greatly appreciate any comments or sugestions.

...and if you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce it tastes alot more like prunes than rhubarb does. groucho

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Is this person really your friend? Maybe it's a setup!! :unsure:

Those raw eggs definitely don't cut it!! Too Risky!! I make a from scratch, no-bake cheesecake. It was my grandmother's favorite dessert. It comes out light and fluffy. No eggs in it, though. You better tell your friend to find another recipe or another cook. :biggrin:

Edited by pepperAnn (log)

pepperAnn

At my house, you get two choices for dinner:

TAKE IT or LEAVE IT!!!

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Try and purchase pasturized egg yolks, that will solve the problem. Or you can cook them over a double boiler until " stinging" temp (not exactly sure the temp) then whip out cold

"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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I think it's 160 to get them safe but I'd just bag them in the recipe. It's plenty rich without them so they won't be missed. A standard no bake is cream cheese, whipped cream, and gelatine plus sugar and flavoring. I don't even usually bother with the gelatin unless it really has to slice up and hold. Plus with the white chocolate it's going to be firmer anyway and it's adding the additional sweetness since the sugar content is fairly low.

Josette

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thanks for your input guys. If i'm feeling ambitious i'm going to make one omitting the yolks and one with the yolks. Bri: i will definately get the yolks and sugar over a double boiler.

JSk: i'm with ya on bagging the yolks altogether, just curious to see if there is actually a difference in taste or texture WITH them, or were they just being used as a vehicle for the gelatin...badly i might add. thanks again.

...and if you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce it tastes alot more like prunes than rhubarb does. groucho

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160 is the "instant kill" temperature for salmonella but you will do less potential damage to your eggs if you hold them at 140 for several minutes, which is just as effective at killing salmonella.

Why don't you make one no-bake and one baked cheesecake? I have prejudices on the subject of cheesecake, and it just seems sad to me to make a cheesecake and have it not be the real deal.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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  • 4 months later...

This recipe is gone from the site :sad: I dont suppose you have a copy anywhere.

No one knows how to make this better!  :biggrin:
No-bake cheesecake

By Christopher Kimball/ Kitchen Detective

Friday, July 30, 2004

The Internet is flush with recipes for No-Bake Cheesecake made with ingredients such as store-bought graham cracker piecrust, Cool Whip, and a box of lemon Jell-O. Not willing to use "convenience" ingredients, we wondered if we could make a no-bake cheesecake from scratch, one that we would really want to eat. After all, the idea is appealing, especially during a hot summer.

a perfect, tested recipe follows ... :laugh:

user posted image
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Last summer they published a nice recipe in Gourmet or Bon appetit that I yried out with good results. I have since modified it to suite my needs. It molds well and is tasty.

You can use Light Brown Sugar instead of Moscavado, or try dark brown for something diffrent, or experiment with powdered sugar as well...

Depending on the use and how long you need it to hold a structure you may want to add some gelatine (added to the cream).

You can also add melted cooled chocolate

Moscavado no-bake cheese cake filling

4 servings

260g cream cheese

80g light moscavado sugar

120g heavy cream (whipped)

beat cheese and sugar til light

fold in whipped cream

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  • 1 year later...

Right need some help here!

I made a cheesecake yesterday which hasn't turned out as planned. To keep things easy i made a non-baked recipe which seemed to rely on the cheese and white chocolate to set the cheesecake. Easy I thought, can't go wrong. I've had too many problems with baked cheesecakes being inconsistent, one day coming out perfect and another a gooey mess (even with temperature probes and oven thermometers at my disposal!)

Anyway, I left the cheesecake to set overnight in the fridge and i checked it this morning and sadly it had not set. The top is kinda set but the bottom is basically liquid. If i tried to release it from the tin half of it would just spill out of the bottom.

The recipe was as follows:

380g white chocolate

380ml whole milk

750g soft cheese (i used 250g ricotta, 500g marscapone)

2 vanilla pods

60g icing sugar

amaretti biscuits + butter for the base

I left the chocolate over a low heat to melt with the whole milk and i began beating the cheese for the base along with the icing sugar and vanilla seeds. Once the chocolate melted i mixed it thoroughly and then left it to cool. Once the cheese was a soft, creamy consistency i added the chocolate/milk mixture and stirred thoroughly and then added it to my springform cake tin (on top of the base, which i had baked and left to cool) and then left it in the fridge. I was somewhat worried about the mixture because it was very thin and i had not used a gelling agent of any kind (as directed in the recipe!)

Right now i'm left with a gooey mess and a fairly costly list of ingredients gone to waste, does anyone have any ideas how to salvage this? I don't know if its a good idea to remove the mixture, beat in some eggs and then try baking it but i'm open to any suggestions! :(

Thanks

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I'm kinda liking the idea of gently adding some beaten eggs and baking it. I don't know. Or do you have any instant pudding? Instant pudding should firm it up without baking.

No instant pudding sadly..

I'm thinking now that perhaps a gelling agent would be better.. perhaps a couple of sheets of gelatin, or even better some agar (i would rather use agar because i wanted to bring the whole thing in to work for my work colleagues and one or two are vegetarian!) I also have some carrageen, not sure which would work best.

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Personally I'd put it in the freezer and make it more of a cheesecake ice-cream :biggrin: rather than mess with baking,eggs etc

Next time you want to make a no bake cheese cake try this one, it never flops

500ml Fresh Cream

500ml Fage Greek yogurt

500ml Cream Cheese

Vanilla Essence

Base biscuits of your choice, I use cinnamon = butter

Beat the cream until stiff then incorporate yogurt and cream cheese Pour over base and refrigerate for a few hours

Top with your favourite topping I use whole black cherry jam.

I don't add any sugar to the mixture because I find with the topping it's sweet enough :biggrin:

Greg :biggrin:

Edited for spelling

Edited by GreekCook (log)
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I'm not real good with converting to (my familiar) ounces from grams & stuff but isn't that a lot of milk? Is it about a cup and half?

edited for clarity

Just over a cup and a half, yes, i thought that too and double checked but its definately correct, i'm not really sure why the milk was in the recipe anyway, i don't see what it adds other than softening the mixture.

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I like the ice cream idea.

Because to me, those ratios are all off--out of whack--so if you add a gelling agent you will have a milky jello-ish dessert?

I vote ice cream unless you go to the store and get some instant pudding to flavor and bodify the goo. It needs body and the idea of gelling isn't gelling with me. Like I would say use a starch or agar or gelatine or something if it was loose. Since you say it is watery, basically a liquid I can't see the gelling idea really helping.

Ice cream or go to the store.

What about soaking up some nice brioche or something and make a bread pudding?

I know I know tres leches!! (I can't stand tres leches but) that would be a good base for that. You need something to suck it up. Like bake a cake and pour the goo on it. But probably do the gelling first then pour it on.

Maybe somethign like that???

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I like the ice cream idea.

Because to me, those ratios are all off--out of whack--so if you add a gelling agent you will have a milky jello-ish dessert?

I vote ice cream unless you go to the store and get some instant pudding to flavor and bodify the goo. It needs body and the idea of gelling isn't gelling with me. Like I would say use a starch or agar or gelatine or something if it was loose. Since you say it is watery, basically a liquid I can't see the gelling idea really helping.

Ice cream or go to the store.

What about soaking up some nice brioche or something and make a bread pudding?

I know I know tres leches!! (I can't stand tres leches but) that would be a good base for that. You need something to suck it up. Like bake a cake and pour the goo on it. But probably do the gelling first then pour it on.

Maybe somethign like that???

I'm pretty gutted thinking about it.. i knew that the quantity of milk looked wrong and it didn't look right going in but by then it was too late anyway.. if i've had a mixture too thick like that before for baking i would sift in some cornflour to give it some body but thats not really an option i guess.

I would usually add around 5 eggs to a mixture like that and bake it.. i'm seriously tempted to go down that route.. it's dangerous but.. well i don't have a lot of option, ice cream is a good idea but i was hoping to make a cake here!

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How about adding more cheese until your mixture stiffens? You can always adjust the sugar to taste and I don't think you'll have to add that much anyway considering that the top half seems to be setting

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How about adding more cheese until your mixture stiffens? You can always adjust the sugar to taste and I don't think you'll have to add that much anyway considering that the top half seems to be setting

Good thinking.. i think 10g sugar + 125g cheese.. maybe more, too much cheese shouldn't hurt as you say, i could beat that seperately and then mix it in, shouldn't be a big problem!

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