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The Griddler


robyn
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I've been a little down lately. Father-in-law died in late December. My Mom died a couple of weeks ago. So I figured I needed a new "toy" to play with - try to cheer myself up. Bought a Griddler by Cuisinart (at Linens 'n Things with a 20% off coupon). So far - my husband and I have worked with it on a simple project: trying to make the perfect grilled cheese (and the tomato soup to go with it). And this weekend we turned out a version that - although perhaps not definitive - was pretty darned good.

It seems like a competent small appliance. Do any of you have one? What do you like making with it? And how do you make it?

The only negative I've seen so far is that the recipes in the recipe book that came with the thing don't seem to give the best instructions about the best heat levels. So we've had to experiment. Now I don't mind experimenting with old moldy bread to make grilled sandwiches - but I'd prefer not to ruin more expensive things 4 times before getting it right :smile: . Robyn

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I bought myself a griddler for Christmas, and in the 9 weeks that I've had it, I've probably used it 30 times. It's great for kicking out a quick burger or two, and making grilled sandwiches.

I've taught my 16 year old son to make himself a sandwich with sliced turkey from the deli on sourdough bread with some Jarlsberg cheese, mustard and mayo on the inside of the sandwich, brush some melted butter on the outside. He grills it for about three minutes on high heat, between the melted cheese, the crisped up bread from the grill and the weight of the press, it makes a very yummy sandwich. :)

And, it's a breeze to clean with the removable plates.

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Quesadillas come to mind.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I've been eyeing that contraption myself, but lack of counter space has been holding me up. I'm really looking forward to seeing what opinions are expressed here about its usefulness - would someone also comment on its storage weight/counter space requirements?

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OK, I just took a look at the beast here. I wanted to confirm that it is what I saw in a TV ad around the holidays. I remember saying to myself that of the countertop grill thingies that the design on the thing made some sense. Noting that you can lay it open and have two cooking surfaces, I would be making some pancakes.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Looking at the pictures, it seems there is a ridged surface.

Yet, one of the functions appears to be a griddle.

Are there two sides to the heating units, one ridged and one flat?

Have been really interested in buying a Cuban sandwich/panini press for a while and any help you could offer would be greatly appreciated.

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I think that the cooking plates are reversible, on side ridged and the other grooved. That and the size and how it comes together seems to make it more versatile than some others I have seen. I haven't looked closely though. I am not in the market for one but have been keeping my eye out for a friend.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Robyn,

I am sorry to hear about your father-in-law, and especially the passing of your Mother. I think one of the most tragic events in one's life is to lose a parent. We grow up looking at them as infallable, they are our mentors, our teachers, our disciplinarians, the ones who love us, the ones who protect us, the ones who teach us right from wrong.

Besides that, when one's parents pass, then we step up to the "line" and we're next. It is a sobering, melancholy realization and marks one of the Significant Emotional Events of one's life.

Since egullet has "new rules", rather than have this post "cancelled", I will mention that I inherited two George Foreman griddlers. We can't find them, or else I would compare their operation to your "griddler". Hope that meets the requirements of posting a reply. I think your griddler is very cool.

doc

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like a competent small appliance.  Do any of you have one?  What do you like making with it?  And how do you make it?

I have a DeLonghi Panini grill HERE and I love it. We've grilled veggies like red bell peppers, asparagus and thick sliced portabello mushrooms with olive oil and balsamic then use them in a sandwich toasted on the grill before cleaning it (from the veggies just cooked). Add some turkey or roast beef and you've got a meal. I typically use thick herb crusted flat bread from the bakery but sometimes use sourdough. I like to put butter and Parm Reg on the toasted side of the bread too. Try different cheeses/veggies/meat combo's. It's fun to experiment. If you don't have access to a bakery with herbed breads, get herb infused oils and use them instead of butter. The recipe book that came with my grill is awesome. I don't have it in front of me but I think it's close to 40 pages with loads of awesome sandwiches. The internet is also loaded with panini recipes..

Bob

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Robyn,

I am sorry to hear about your father-in-law, and especially the passing of your Mother.  I think one of the most tragic events in one's life is to lose a parent.  We grow up looking at them as infallable, they are our mentors, our teachers, our disciplinarians, the ones who love us, the ones who protect us, the ones who teach us right from wrong.

Besides that, when one's parents pass, then we step up to the "line" and we're next.  It is a sobering, melancholy realization and marks one of the Significant Emotional Events of one's life.

Since egullet has "new rules", rather than have this post "cancelled", I will mention that I inherited two George Foreman griddlers.  We can't find them, or else I would compare their operation to your "griddler".  Hope that meets the requirements of posting a reply.  I think your griddler is very cool.

doc

Thanks for those kind thoughts. It is especially hard on us because we simply haven't had time to grieve - or even take a deep breath. And now we have to deal with my Dad - 87 (but in good physical and mental health). As hard as it is on us - it's harder on him - because he's lost his life companion of 62 years. So we will try our best to deal with the living now - the last of our 4 parents - because that's more important than dealing with the dead.

And - like you - I will note in response to a question that The Griddler has 2 sets of plates - one with ridges - one without (not one reversible set of plates). Both sets go into the dishwasher - and are extremely easy to clean. Robyn

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We have had a George Foreman grill for about 2 years and we almost never use it, succombing to a feeling of superiority to such a device, prefering it's outdoor counterpart. But recently I have discovered it's usefullness in panini and other sandwhich preperation. I'm getting lots of good ideas here- grilled portobellos- YUM!

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Wow, this couldn't be any more time. I'm waiting for my griddler to come in the mail. I happened to have a macys gift card, so I ordered online from there.

I have the george foreman with the bun warmer. I've used it dozens of times for burgers and stuff, but it really only is for one person. I've tried it for grilled cheese, but the lack of a floating hinge yields unsatisfactory results.

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I'm sorry for your loss. If I were in your shoes I would definately take the time to slowely roast a pork shoulder, slice it while still warm a fuzzy, put it one some cuban bread with sliced ham, mustard, pickle, and swiss cheese, then press the hell out of it on your new griddle. Make sure to make enough to share with others.

"He could blanch anything in the fryolator and finish it in the microwave or under the salamander. Talented guy."

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I'm sorry for your loss.  If I were in your shoes I would definately take the time to slowely roast a pork shoulder, slice it while still warm a fuzzy, put it one some cuban bread with sliced ham, mustard, pickle, and swiss cheese, then press the hell out of it on your new griddle.  Make sure to make enough to share with others.

Thanks. You're talking about a Cuban sandwich. We were thinking of trying those (we lived in Miami for 25 years). If we don't want to take the time to make the pork shoulder (and it would probably be too much for 2 sandwiches :smile: ) - is there any kind of prepared pork product we can substitute? For what it's worth - we have Latin American products available here in both large non-ethnic and small ethnic grocery stores. And lots and lots of pork products (the south is full of pork products I'd never seen before I moved here). Robyn

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Don't make the sandwich then.

Kind of kidding, and kind of not. That is what makes the sandwich, other than the bread. You can always use the rest of the pork for burritos, tacos, empanadas, shread it and make bbq sandwiches, put it on pizza, or even in pasta, chili, reheat it later on in the week and have it for dinner with mashed taters. I have to stop typing now.

Edited by chefdg (log)

"He could blanch anything in the fryolator and finish it in the microwave or under the salamander. Talented guy."

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robyn . . .

Get a pork butt and slow roast it or braise it with Goya Mojo Criollo until it is pull apart tender. I have found pieces as small as 3 pounds. Then put portions into small foil packets for reheating in the oven or toaster oven. (I think microwaving makes meat taste funny.) That stuff is pantry gold.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Don't make the sandwich then. 

Kind of kidding, and kind of not.  That is what makes the sandwich, other than the bread.  You can always use the rest of the pork for burritos, tacos, empanadas, shread it and make bbq sandwiches, put it on pizza, or even in pasta, chili, reheat it later on in the week and have it for dinner with mashed taters.  I have to stop typing now.

No problem. Sometimes there's no substitute for a particular ingredient - and - apparently - there isn't one here. Robyn

P.S. Thought a while. We go to a local BBQ place where the pork portions are huge. Might make sense to order lunch - and take home the leftovers for sandwiches. The pork is usually shredded - but I can ask for some slices and some shreds.

Edited by robyn (log)
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Fifi and Chefdg - I went to the store today looking for a pork shoulder - or a pork butt - or whatever. Got a little confused (I don't even know if they're the same cut). What is the cut of pork I should be looking for?

Fifi - I assume when you say braise the cut (whatever it is) in mojo - I can do it like a brisket (put the liquid on top of the meat - and in the bottom of a tin foil package - wrap it to make it air-tight - and braise it. Or do you do pork a different way? I assume putting some garlic on the top would help. Am I correct? By the way - I do brisket at 325 for 3 hours. Is that too much for pork? Robyn

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robyn . . .

Pork shoulder and butt are the same cut. Get one with enough fat on it. Pork fat is a good thing. Put it in a heavy pot like a dutch oven with about 2 inches of whatever liquid you want (get the Goya Mojo if you can or use lime juice, orange juice, cumin and lots of black pepper to sub for a Latino flavor) and lots of garlic. I don't bother to peel the garlic. I usually cook at 250 - 275 for at least 3 hours. I really look for it to be ready to be "pulled." What you are actually want for the sandwiches is that kind of meat. You are actually braising so you might want to check out the recent labs and general discussion in eGCI.

If you don't have a heavy pot, just use one of those cooking bags. That works fine for pork.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Thanks Fifi. I'll try to find some time in the next few weeks to make the pork. Now that we've perfected grilled cheese - we're going to try pancakes sometime this week (if I can find some decent berries at the market). Robyn

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Please let us know how it does with the pancakes. A friend is looking at getting one but is wondering if it is heavy enough to provide even heat for perfectly browned pancakes.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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The pancakes turned out great. Evenly cooked (perhaps not perfect but really good). Better than my usual (done with a double burner All Clad griddle). Note that I use a package of White Lily mix (think White Lily is mostly a southern product). And no grease at all (on the Griddler or the All Clad griddle). Griddler will do 4 average size pancakes at a time (2 on each side) - perhaps 3 smaller ones on each side. I'm sure this isn't the perfect "do-everything" small electric appliance - but I've been pleased with it to date. Robyn

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