Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Coming To Tysons: Morimoto, Coastal Flats,


Joe H
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'd love to see Great American Restaurants (Coastal Flats, Artie's, etc.) put its first Loudoun restaurant in this area.

Actually there is a Sweetwater in Sterling, which is in Loudoun County. Waits of well over an hour every weekend.

Note to self: must open restaurant in boonies.

Thanks to Bilrus for the note about Sweetwater in Sterling; I forget about that whole area up there.

As for opening a restaurant in the boonies, this area is like the Comstock Lode. Washington might have the most affluent boonies in the country (at least on the Virginia side).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[www.asterrestaurant.com

come on out. . .you'll like the food

. . . amongst other things

Horseplay: are you associated with Aster? The Washingtonian's current issue just gave Aster a nice preview sort of writeup.

I can vouch for the attractiveness of the room, having eaten there when it was the Black Coffee Bistro.

The food sounds very interesting, but the prices, um, sound like they are aimed at the horsey set (owners, not groomers).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How do you define a chain?  More than one location?  If so does that mean that Thomas Keller lost his drive for the "craft"?  While his three restaurants have different names, they are owned by the same group.  How about Ray's?  Will that suddenly become nothing more than a place that is all about cash and cramming as many people through the door when the Silver Spring location opens? 

It is also silly to think that people who only have one location do not care about making cash, or for that matter that all of them care about the "craft".

Sorry, late to this thread.

Ray's already is nothing more than a place that is all about cash and cramming in as many people as possible. What ever made you think otherwise?

Actually, I am opening Silver Spring so I can stop having to cram people into Ray's and let it go back to being a neighborhood restaurant.

I'm with Joe on this, by the way, it's the Viennas and the Herndons, the Silver Springs and the Kentlands that will allow chefs to shine and make an honest living honestly and redeem DC as a restaurant town.

Bring it to the people and work your heart out for them. Don't worry about the Hummer or the Porsche, just remember who you are working for.

It's not so much about rents, although that can slowly suffocate an operation; it's that no DC landlord will sign a lease with an individual operator (and rightly so for the most part) without a ridiculous amount of well-connected backing and, more perniciously, the cost of build-out, PR hype and manpower necessary to do business in DC.

To compete in DC you simply must open at the level of IndeBleu, Le Paradou or at the very least Mie N Yiu. And you better believe that Adamson and Demetrou gets paid in full, up-front and in cash (or certified check).

Meanwhile, not to worry, the rest of us can just pay extra for our produce, wine, meat, fish and supplies to cover the cost of others not paying their bills.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with Joe on this, by the way, it's the Viennas and the Herndons, the Silver Springs and the Kentlands that will allow chefs to shine and make an honest living honestly and redeem DC as a restaurant town.

So will you PLEASE come to Herndon? :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, late to this thread.

Ray's already is nothing more than a place that is all about cash and cramming in as many people as possible. What ever made you think otherwise?

Actually, I am opening Silver Spring so I can stop having to cram people into Ray's and let it go back to being a neighborhood restaurant.

I'm with Joe on this, by the way, it's the Viennas and the Herndons, the Silver Springs and the Kentlands that will allow chefs to shine and make an honest living honestly and redeem DC as a restaurant town.

Bring it to the people and work your heart out for them. Don't worry about the Hummer or the Porsche, just remember who you are working for.

It's not so much about rents, although that can slowly suffocate an operation; it's that no DC landlord will sign a lease with an individual operator (and rightly so for the most part) without a ridiculous amount of well-connected backing and, more perniciously, the cost of build-out, PR hype and manpower necessary to do business in DC.

To compete in DC you simply must open at the level of IndeBleu, Le Paradou or at the very least Mie N Yiu. And you better believe that Adamson and Demetrou gets paid in full, up-front and in cash (or certified check).

Meanwhile, not to worry, the rest of us can just pay extra for our produce, wine, meat, fish and supplies to cover the cost of others not paying their bills.

[/quote

Amen! How much start-up would you need for a restaurant the size of Ray's The Steak? I can guarantee if a restaurant of that caliber opened up in Western Prince William, you would be full every night. Here in Gainesville/Haymarket, we have a BoneFish, there is a wait every night.This for average food, but it is the best we have here. If you build it they will most definately come.

Edited to ask what am I doing wrong that the quotes aren't appearing correctly?

Edited by raisab (log)

Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't resist. Having worked out in Leesburg until recently, I must say that the businesses and residents out in Loudoun, Fauquier and the outskirts of the Shenandoah (some of whom actually commute for hours each day into the city for work and don't want to have to do that trip on the weekends as well) could use a few "urban-caliber" restaurants closer to home. It's difficult for professionals to find a fine dining establishment to go to with clients or potential employees (I used to interview MD's looking to come to the area, and had to travel 40 minutes to Tysons for a place to impress them during second and third interview trips). Tusky's, Lightfoot and the others are trying to fill the demands, but there is only so much of a good thing you can take on a regular basis.

I'm also surprised that no one has mentioned that Todd Grey has had success with Market Salamander out in Middleburg. Talk about virgin territory for fine dining satellite locations with patrons capable of paying to cover costs!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing I have to ask Joe...  What is a "legitimate chain"?  All chains, regardless whether you find them legitimate or not, lack a soul.  They are in it for one reason and one reason only, cash.  It's not about the craft with them, it's about cramming as many people through their doors at a minimum cost, period.  Just my opinion.

This may be one of the most pretentious things that I have heard all day.

So I guess that Jaleo has no soul? Whatever

Jennifer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm also surprised that no one has mentioned that Todd Grey has had success with Market Salamander out in Middleburg.  Talk about virgin territory for fine dining satellite locations with patrons capable of paying to cover costs!

Middleburg is a unique animal. How many other burgs do you know of that have so few residents and so many eateries, real estate agencies, and cutsey-poo shops?

Market Salamander is very nice, with some really good barbecue sandwiches :biggrin: and other stuff. But let's not forget that it's bankrolled by Sheila Johnson and could exist indefinitely no matter how much money it makes or loses.

Let's see how the new Aster Restaurant does. High prices plus cutting-edge food is an interesting combination for the capital of horse country. The former will be no problem; the latter could be a big problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[www.asterrestaurant.com

come on out. . .you'll like the food

. . . amongst other things

Horseplay: are you associated with Aster? The Washingtonian's current issue just gave Aster a nice preview sort of writeup.

I can vouch for the attractiveness of the room, having eaten there when it was the Black Coffee Bistro.

The food sounds very interesting, but the prices, um, sound like they are aimed at the horsey set (owners, not groomers).

Yes Bob, I am associated with Aster. I'm the Maitre 'D/Bartender/Host/Janitor/. . .

But yes you are right we are not an inexepensive restaurant. We are a fine dining establishment and and our prices reflect what comes out on the plate, as well as what is on the walls and the staff of professionals that service our guests. We are not targeting the horsey set, although right now they make up the majority of our clientele. Rather, we are targeting the foodie, such as those who post on and read egullet. The Washingtonian "Best Bite" article was great in that the magazine reaches Chantilly, Reston, Herndon, Ashburne, Great Falls, etc. Aster will succeed when the foodies in these areas find out about us. Bob, thank you for your interest and I look foward to having you as my guest.

Cordially,

Craig Erion

Maitre 'D

Aster

Edited by HORSEPLAY (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly.

You made your choice based on having a good school system.

I made mine to make it easier to expose Peanut to a wider variety of cultural experiences available inside the beltway.

I am in no way saying that one choice is better than the other. For me my choice was better. For you, your choice was. No need to get defensive.

Please reread my previous post -- You are one person. Most of the people I have met who end up choosing to live in the outer 'burbs are not the same as you.

We can agree to disagree pleasantly.

have a lovely day.

I did not move to Reston until I was 41 years old. I did not have children. Schools had no bearing on my decision to live here. Nor did they play any role in my decision to live in Silver Spring or in McLean Gardens.

I am sorry but it is impossible for me not to respond to you. There is no one on this or any board who will obsessively, endlessly, passionately promote DC more than I. Once a month my wife and I visit the National/Warner/Kennedy/etc. Once every two weeks we eat somewhere downtown. I drive from Reston to the Mall and walk the four miles roundtrip from the Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial and back-once every two weeks in the spring and summer. I feel priviliged to have been born here and to have grown up here. I have also made the active decision with a business that allows me to literally live anywhere in North America to live here. To CONTINUE to live HERE, if you don't mind, since I love this city-my CITY-so much. As a rare native born Washingtonian I claim this right. I would add that I also married a native born Washingtonian!

I would also note that in the early '60's I took girls on dates to the Jefferson Memorial thinking what a great place for a first kiss (!),in the late '60's I was gassed at Dupont Circle as a war protester; later, I saw Hendrix, stoned, play the Star Spangled Banner while I, also, was stoned at the Ambassador theatre at 18th and Columbia in '69. I've been to the Folklife Festival a dozen times, fireworks on the Mall thirty or forty times, eaten fish sandwiches on Maine Avenue in five decades and am one of the few who have taken the tour of the haunted catacombs under the Lincoln Memorial which the National Park Service used to host at midnight. Of course I've been to the White House, the Supreme Court, worked on a second degree in the National Archives and had many "last cigarette evers" outside of the jaw dropping, awe inspiring artistic and literary majesty of the Library of Congress. I also drove a cab for eight or nine years in the city and gave countless, endless tours of all of DC, from the observation platform of the National Cathedral (the HIGHEST POINT OF THE CITY) to a rise in Southeast overlooking the expansive city which is the most impressive view of Washington.

I know a bit about Washington. I know a bit about its culture. And its opportunities. As well as its past and what it is today.

I live in Reston. In a 31 unit townhouse cluster. A neighbor and a good friend is the former CFO of AIG and lived, before Reston, in Knightsbridge in London for 8 years. Today he lives in London for two months, Malaga for two and my cluster for eight. Another neighbor is head of sales for an IT services company (not quite the position today that it may sound!). He is from India as is his wife. A third neighbor also has a "second" house in his hometown-Sydney. He bought a house here while on assignment for his Australian company. A fourth neighbor just moved from Praha (Prague in the Czech Republic), a fifth from Budapest (where my best friend was also born and lived for his first twenty + years). Did I mention the neighbor from Bremen? The neighbor who just moved back from Tel Aviv? The neighbor who's last assignment was the first secretary in the American embassy in Singapore? Of course there are others. Of course there is myself who travels over 30 days a year in Europe on business and does driving trips through six or seven countries no longer using a map.

Don't talk to me about a lack of culture in the suburbs or agreeing to disagree. Because one lives "outside the beltway" does not mean they have any less culture, any less "couth" than you or anyone else. The wealth of living in a truly international community is absolutely invaluable. The wealth of travelling internationally is also. One does not need to live in the city that I was born in and grew up in to know this.

And, as for schools in the suburbs, do you have any idea of the ethnic composition of Thomas Jefferson, arguably America's best school? It's in the suburbs. Or Montgomery Blair, Montgomery County's magnet school, my alma mater, in Silver Spring?

I'm sorry but the arrogance of those who move to the city which is mine can be stifling and overwhelming at times. Whether McLean, Georgetown, Landover or Middleburg we are all Washingtonians. This city, my city, does not limit it's opportunities and cultural wealth to either its borders or to those who live within its geographical boundaries. Forgive me but sometimes I think its necessary to point out that life doesn't end when one crosses the river. Nor do cultural opportunities. This is an extraordinary city, one of the Great places on earth where many people come together. Just not all live where you think they do. Some, perhaps many, perhaps even most, are "out here."

Edited by Joe H (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[www.asterrestaurant.com

come on out. . .you'll like the food

. . . amongst other things

Horseplay: are you associated with Aster? The Washingtonian's current issue just gave Aster a nice preview sort of writeup.

I can vouch for the attractiveness of the room, having eaten there when it was the Black Coffee Bistro.

The food sounds very interesting, but the prices, um, sound like they are aimed at the horsey set (owners, not groomers).

Yes Bob, I am associated with Aster. I'm the Maitre 'D/Bartender/Host/Janitor/. . .

But yes you are right we are not an inexepensive restaurant. We are a fine dining establishment and and our prices reflect what comes out on the plate, as well as what is on the walls and the staff of professionals that service our guests. We are not targeting the horsey set, although right now they make up the majority of our clientele. Rather, we are targeting the foodie, such as those who post on and read egullet. The Washingtonian "Best Bite" article was great in that the magazine reaches Chantilly, Reston, Herndon, Ashburne, Great Falls, etc. Aster will succeed when the foodies in these areas find out about us. Bob, thank you for your interest and I look foward to having you as my guest.

Cordially,

Craig Erion

Maitre 'D

Aster

Craig: thanks for responding. I look forward to trying Aster but it may be a while -- we have seven-month-old twins. :wacko: Right now the budget is more in the Teddy's Pizza range, so you guys have to stick around for a couple years at least!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing I have to ask Joe...  What is a "legitimate chain"?  All chains, regardless whether you find them legitimate or not, lack a soul.  They are in it for one reason and one reason only, cash.  It's not about the craft with them, it's about cramming as many people through their doors at a minimum cost, period.  Just my opinion.

This may be one of the most pretentious things that I have heard all day.

So I guess that Jaleo has no soul? Whatever

The ONLY point I was trying to make was the further "Wal-Mart-ification" of the restaurant business will make us one day hanker for the independants. That's all.

"I know the human being and fish can coexist peacefully."

—George W. Bush in Saginaw, Mich., Sept. 29, 2000

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly.

You made your choice based on having a good school system.

I made mine to make it easier to expose Peanut to a wider variety of cultural experiences available inside the beltway.

I am in no way saying that one choice is better than the other. For me my choice was better. For you, your choice was. No need to get defensive.

Please reread my previous post -- You are one person. Most of the people I have met who end up choosing to live in the outer 'burbs are not the same as you.

We can agree to disagree pleasantly.

have a lovely day.

I did not move to Reston until I was 41 years old. I did not have children. Schools had no bearing on my decision to live here. Nor did they play any role in my decision to live in Silver Spring or in McLean Gardens.

I am sorry but it is impossible for me not to respond to you. There is no one on this or any board who will obsessively, endlessly, passionately promote DC more than I. Once a month my wife and I visit the National/Warner/Kennedy/etc. Once every two weeks we eat somewhere downtown. I drive from Reston to the Mall and walk the four miles roundtrip from the Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial and back-once every two weeks in the spring and summer. I feel priviliged to have been born here and to have grown up here. I have also made the active decision with a business that allows me to literally live anywhere in North America to live here. To CONTINUE to live HERE, if you don't mind, since I love this city-my CITY-so much. As a rare native born Washingtonian I claim this right. I would add that I also married a native born Washingtonian!

I would also note that in the early '60's I took girls on dates to the Jefferson Memorial thinking what a great place for a first kiss (!),in the late '60's I was gassed at Dupont Circle as a war protester; later, I saw Hendrix, stoned, play the Star Spangled Banner while I, also, was stoned at the Ambassador theatre at 18th and Columbia in '69. I've been to the Folklife Festival a dozen times, fireworks on the Mall thirty or forty times, eaten fish sandwiches on Maine Avenue in five decades and am one of the few who have taken the tour of the haunted catacombs under the Lincoln Memorial which the National Park Service used to host at midnight. Of course I've been to the White House, the Supreme Court, worked on a second degree in the National Archives and had many "last cigarette evers" outside of the jaw dropping, awe inspiring artistic and literary majesty of the Library of Congress. I also drove a cab for eight or nine years in the city and gave countless, endless tours of all of DC, from the observation platform of the National Cathedral (the HIGHEST POINT OF THE CITY) to a rise in Southeast overlooking the expansive city which is the most impressive view of Washington.

I know a bit about Washington. I know a bit about its culture. And its opportunities. As well as its past and what it is today.

I live in Reston. In a 31 unit townhouse cluster. A neighbor and a good friend is the former CFO of AIG and lived, before Reston, in Knightsbridge in London for 8 years. Today he lives in London for two months, Malaga for two and my cluster for eight. Another neighbor is head of sales for an IT services company (not quite the position today that it may sound!). He is from India as is his wife. A third neighbor also has a "second" house in his hometown-Sydney. He bought a house here while on assignment for his Australian company. A fourth neighbor just moved from Praha (Prague in the Czech Republic), a fifth from Budapest (where my best friend was also born and lived for his first twenty + years). Did I mention the neighbor from Bremen? The neighbor who just moved back from Tel Aviv? The neighbor who's last assignment was the first secretary in the American embassy in Singapore? Of course there are others. Of course there is myself who travels over 30 days a year in Europe on business and does driving trips through six or seven countries no longer using a map.

Don't talk to me about a lack of culture in the suburbs or agreeing to disagree. Because one lives "outside the beltway" does not mean they have any less culture, any less "couth" than you or anyone else. The wealth of living in a truly international community is absolutely invaluable. The wealth of travelling internationally is also. One does not need to live in the city that I was born in and grew up in to know this.

And, as for schools in the suburbs, do you have any idea of the ethnic composition of Thomas Jefferson, arguably America's best school? It's in the suburbs. Or Montgomery Blair, Montgomery County's magnet school, my alma mater, in Silver Spring?

I'm sorry but the arrogance of those who move to the city which is mine can be stifling and overwhelming at times. Whether McLean, Georgetown, Landover or Middleburg we are all Washingtonians. This city, my city, does not limit it's opportunities and cultural wealth to either its borders or to those who live within its geographical boundaries. Forgive me but sometimes I think its necessary to point out that life doesn't end when one crosses the river. Nor do cultural opportunities. This is an extraordinary city, one of the Great places on earth where many people come together. Just not all live where you think they do. Some, perhaps many, perhaps even most, are "out here."

Sometimes I get a bit carried away. Sorry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly.

You made your choice based on having a good school system.

I made mine to make it easier to expose Peanut to a wider variety of cultural experiences available inside the beltway.

I am in no way saying that one choice is better than the other. For me my choice was better. For you, your choice was. No need to get defensive.

Please reread my previous post -- You are one person. Most of the people I have met who end up choosing to live in the outer 'burbs are not the same as you.

We can agree to disagree pleasantly.

have a lovely day.

I did not move to Reston until I was 41 years old. I did not have children. Schools had no bearing on my decision to live here. Nor did they play any role in my decision to live in Silver Spring or in McLean Gardens.

I am sorry but it is impossible for me not to respond to you. There is no one on this or any board who will obsessively, endlessly, passionately promote DC more than I. Once a month my wife and I visit the National/Warner/Kennedy/etc. Once every two weeks we eat somewhere downtown. I drive from Reston to the Mall and walk the four miles roundtrip from the Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial and back-once every two weeks in the spring and summer. I feel priviliged to have been born here and to have grown up here. I have also made the active decision with a business that allows me to literally live anywhere in North America to live here. To CONTINUE to live HERE, if you don't mind, since I love this city-my CITY-so much. As a rare native born Washingtonian I claim this right. I would add that I also married a native born Washingtonian!

I would also note that in the early '60's I took girls on dates to the Jefferson Memorial thinking what a great place for a first kiss (!),in the late '60's I was gassed at Dupont Circle as a war protester; later, I saw Hendrix, stoned, play the Star Spangled Banner while I, also, was stoned at the Ambassador theatre at 18th and Columbia in '69. I've been to the Folklife Festival a dozen times, fireworks on the Mall thirty or forty times, eaten fish sandwiches on Maine Avenue in five decades and am one of the few who have taken the tour of the haunted catacombs under the Lincoln Memorial which the National Park Service used to host at midnight. Of course I've been to the White House, the Supreme Court, worked on a second degree in the National Archives and had many "last cigarette evers" outside of the jaw dropping, awe inspiring artistic and literary majesty of the Library of Congress. I also drove a cab for eight or nine years in the city and gave countless, endless tours of all of DC, from the observation platform of the National Cathedral (the HIGHEST POINT OF THE CITY) to a rise in Southeast overlooking the expansive city which is the most impressive view of Washington.

I know a bit about Washington. I know a bit about its culture. And its opportunities. As well as its past and what it is today.

I live in Reston. In a 31 unit townhouse cluster. A neighbor and a good friend is the former CFO of AIG and lived, before Reston, in Knightsbridge in London for 8 years. Today he lives in London for two months, Malaga for two and my cluster for eight. Another neighbor is head of sales for an IT services company (not quite the position today that it may sound!). He is from India as is his wife. A third neighbor also has a "second" house in his hometown-Sydney. He bought a house here while on assignment for his Australian company. A fourth neighbor just moved from Praha (Prague in the Czech Republic), a fifth from Budapest (where my best friend was also born and lived for his first twenty + years). Did I mention the neighbor from Bremen? The neighbor who just moved back from Tel Aviv? The neighbor who's last assignment was the first secretary in the American embassy in Singapore? Of course there are others. Of course there is myself who travels over 30 days a year in Europe on business and does driving trips through six or seven countries no longer using a map.

Don't talk to me about a lack of culture in the suburbs or agreeing to disagree. Because one lives "outside the beltway" does not mean they have any less culture, any less "couth" than you or anyone else. The wealth of living in a truly international community is absolutely invaluable. The wealth of travelling internationally is also. One does not need to live in the city that I was born in and grew up in to know this.

And, as for schools in the suburbs, do you have any idea of the ethnic composition of Thomas Jefferson, arguably America's best school? It's in the suburbs. Or Montgomery Blair, Montgomery County's magnet school, my alma mater, in Silver Spring?

I'm sorry but the arrogance of those who move to the city which is mine can be stifling and overwhelming at times. Whether McLean, Georgetown, Landover or Middleburg we are all Washingtonians. This city, my city, does not limit it's opportunities and cultural wealth to either its borders or to those who live within its geographical boundaries. Forgive me but sometimes I think its necessary to point out that life doesn't end when one crosses the river. Nor do cultural opportunities. This is an extraordinary city, one of the Great places on earth where many people come together. Just not all live where you think they do. Some, perhaps many, perhaps even most, are "out here."

Sometimes I get a bit carried away. Sorry.

The only thing this post needs is "Pomp and Circumstances" playing in the background. :raz: I'm just playing Mr. H I truly respect your devotion to this town. As a born and raised New Yorker I strongly relate to the type of pride you display.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly.

You made your choice based on having a good school system.

I made mine to make it easier to expose Peanut to a wider variety of cultural experiences available inside the beltway.

I am in no way saying that one choice is better than the other. For me my choice was better. For you, your choice was. No need to get defensive.

Please reread my previous post -- You are one person. Most of the people I have met who end up choosing to live in the outer 'burbs are not the same as you.

We can agree to disagree pleasantly.

have a lovely day.

I did not move to Reston until I was 41 years old. I did not have children. Schools had no bearing on my decision to live here. Nor did they play any role in my decision to live in Silver Spring or in McLean Gardens.

I am sorry but it is impossible for me not to respond to you. There is no one on this or any board who will obsessively, endlessly, passionately promote DC more than I. Once a month my wife and I visit the National/Warner/Kennedy/etc. Once every two weeks we eat somewhere downtown. I drive from Reston to the Mall and walk the four miles roundtrip from the Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial and back-once every two weeks in the spring and summer. I feel priviliged to have been born here and to have grown up here. I have also made the active decision with a business that allows me to literally live anywhere in North America to live here. To CONTINUE to live HERE, if you don't mind, since I love this city-my CITY-so much. As a rare native born Washingtonian I claim this right. I would add that I also married a native born Washingtonian!

I would also note that in the early '60's I took girls on dates to the Jefferson Memorial thinking what a great place for a first kiss (!),in the late '60's I was gassed at Dupont Circle as a war protester; later, I saw Hendrix, stoned, play the Star Spangled Banner while I, also, was stoned at the Ambassador theatre at 18th and Columbia in '69. I've been to the Folklife Festival a dozen times, fireworks on the Mall thirty or forty times, eaten fish sandwiches on Maine Avenue in five decades and am one of the few who have taken the tour of the haunted catacombs under the Lincoln Memorial which the National Park Service used to host at midnight. Of course I've been to the White House, the Supreme Court, worked on a second degree in the National Archives and had many "last cigarette evers" outside of the jaw dropping, awe inspiring artistic and literary majesty of the Library of Congress. I also drove a cab for eight or nine years in the city and gave countless, endless tours of all of DC, from the observation platform of the National Cathedral (the HIGHEST POINT OF THE CITY) to a rise in Southeast overlooking the expansive city which is the most impressive view of Washington.

I know a bit about Washington. I know a bit about its culture. And its opportunities. As well as its past and what it is today.

I live in Reston. In a 31 unit townhouse cluster. A neighbor and a good friend is the former CFO of AIG and lived, before Reston, in Knightsbridge in London for 8 years. Today he lives in London for two months, Malaga for two and my cluster for eight. Another neighbor is head of sales for an IT services company (not quite the position today that it may sound!). He is from India as is his wife. A third neighbor also has a "second" house in his hometown-Sydney. He bought a house here while on assignment for his Australian company. A fourth neighbor just moved from Praha (Prague in the Czech Republic), a fifth from Budapest (where my best friend was also born and lived for his first twenty + years). Did I mention the neighbor from Bremen? The neighbor who just moved back from Tel Aviv? The neighbor who's last assignment was the first secretary in the American embassy in Singapore? Of course there are others. Of course there is myself who travels over 30 days a year in Europe on business and does driving trips through six or seven countries no longer using a map.

Don't talk to me about a lack of culture in the suburbs or agreeing to disagree. Because one lives "outside the beltway" does not mean they have any less culture, any less "couth" than you or anyone else. The wealth of living in a truly international community is absolutely invaluable. The wealth of travelling internationally is also. One does not need to live in the city that I was born in and grew up in to know this.

And, as for schools in the suburbs, do you have any idea of the ethnic composition of Thomas Jefferson, arguably America's best school? It's in the suburbs. Or Montgomery Blair, Montgomery County's magnet school, my alma mater, in Silver Spring?

I'm sorry but the arrogance of those who move to the city which is mine can be stifling and overwhelming at times. Whether McLean, Georgetown, Landover or Middleburg we are all Washingtonians. This city, my city, does not limit it's opportunities and cultural wealth to either its borders or to those who live within its geographical boundaries. Forgive me but sometimes I think its necessary to point out that life doesn't end when one crosses the river. Nor do cultural opportunities. This is an extraordinary city, one of the Great places on earth where many people come together. Just not all live where you think they do. Some, perhaps many, perhaps even most, are "out here."

Sometimes I get a bit carried away. Sorry.

Really? :wink:

Bill Russell

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whether McLean, Georgetown, Landover or Middleburg we are all Washingtonians. This city, my city, does not limit it's opportunities and cultural wealth to either its borders or to those who live within its geographical boundaries. Forgive me but sometimes I think its necessary to point out that life doesn't end when one crosses the river. Nor do cultural opportunities. This is an extraordinary city, one of the Great places on earth where many people come together. Just not all live where you think they do. Some, perhaps many, perhaps even most, are "out here."

Very well put Joe.

Unfortunately, fine dining in MoCo is likely to be a pipe dream, just because of the restrictive liquor laws, taxes, etc. But what we can't manage in the way of fine dining we more than make up for in the ethnic department. :wink:

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly.

You made your choice based on having a good school system.

I made mine to make it easier to expose Peanut to a wider variety of cultural experiences available inside the beltway.

I am in no way saying that one choice is better than the other. For me my choice was better. For you, your choice was. No need to get defensive.

Please reread my previous post -- You are one person. Most of the people I have met who end up choosing to live in the outer 'burbs are not the same as you.

We can agree to disagree pleasantly.

have a lovely day.

The objectivity, fairness, and above all succinctness of this post are highly refreshing.

Don’t you have a machine that puts food into the mouth and pushes it down?

--Nikita Khrushchev to Richard Nixon during the "Kitchen Debate" in Moscow, 1959

Link to comment
Share on other sites

one of the few who have taken the tour of the haunted catacombs under the Lincoln Memorial which the National Park Service used to host at midnight.

What's that all about? Never heard of it!

Love,

Mr. Roger Troutman, who enjoys food and beverages.

CHAIR, INTERNATIONAL DINING RESEARCH INSTITUTE

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

one of the few who have taken the tour of the haunted catacombs under the Lincoln Memorial which the National Park Service used to host at midnight.

What's that all about? Never heard of it!

The National Park Service used to give a tour by "lantern light" with a ranger at midnight of the catacombs underneath the Lincoln Memorial and part of the Mall. Yes, there are catacombs, part of which are really the foundations of the Memorial but they are extensive and spread underneath part of the Mall. The story is that troops went down there in the 19th Century, became lost and never found their way out. Back in the '70's when they gave these tours you had to sign up six months in advance because of their popularity, in combination with picking small groups to accompany the rangers who led them. To say they are creepy is an understatement. Legitimately scary and, in a small way, DC's version of the Paris or Seattle undergrounds. At some point, I believe in the early '80's, they stopped them. I have no idea why but they were a big deal, especially on a foggy, damp night in Fall, especially after a night of bar hopping.

DC has a lot of stuff like this which never make the tourbooks and even most locals are not aware of. Old Town has a tour of haunted houses around Halloween that is more than worthwhile and there are others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Old Town has a tour of haunted houses around Halloween that is more than worthwhile and there are others.

This is surely not a hidden event as there are signs on King St. where you sign up. They are not particulary scary either, as some friends of mine went one night. The only surprising thing was when some homeowner turned on the porch light to see what the noise was about outside. :biggrin:

The underground tour of DC does sound interesting.

Wearing jeans to the best restaurants in town.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...