Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

schneich

Ganache: Tips, Techniques & Troubleshooting

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

 

8 oz dark chocolate

4 ounces double cream

.5 ounce cocoa butter

.5 ounce butter

.5 ounce glucose syrup

small spoon vanilla 

 

Is this ganache to fatty? I feel like it's not setting up properly but I'm not sure if it's the proportions of the ganache or something else. Also it seems runny. Should I add more chocolate? I'm trying to make a filling to go in shell cups. So the ganache shows, I don't cover it.

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No answer from me, I'm afraid, but I'm always interested in reading about these sorts of problems.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're messing with my head being from the UK but using ounces! A very basic ganache like that is often just equal parts cream and chocolate...there are countless recipes however that are more or less of both. But 2:1 chocolate to cream seems like it should not only set up, but set up firm. I ran to Paul Young's book to see his basic and its 250g:250g and 150g muscovado. I've used that one before and its a firm ganache...almost firm enough to slab for dipping.  

 

Another common base for me is 500g chocolate, 250g cream, 150g butter.

 

So...are you waiting long enough for it to set up? Is your room too warm for it to set up? Throw a spoonful in the fridge and see what happens.

And I don't think it would make a difference but tell us about your process...maybe there's a clue in that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heat up the cream with all the rest of the stuff until just before boiling and put it on top of the tempered chocolate pellets (cocoa Barry). I then wait before mixing gently. Maybe the problem is I add some hazelnut bits after this? I don't know with the first pic above, the undecorated ones, I actually attempted to repair the ganache by heating it and then by adding glucose syrup and finally by adding some milk and it still ended up looking like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh I ended up adding about two

Ounces melted chocolate to it as well which is why this morning it's quite hard!

Oh and Rob:

I'm American even though I live in London lol! I'm actually comfortable with both but it just happens that I measured this out in ounces probably because I was looking at Andrew Shotts book.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The round one is the first try the 50:50 and the oval is the second botched attempt outlined above. I added butter and cocoa butter to improve mouth feel but neither has a nice mouth feel.

image.jpg

image.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I then wait before mixing gently.

 

The more movement your ganache gets, the finer the emulsion will be and the smoother the mouth feel will be. Try blitzing it with a stick blender or a food processor. This will also cause it to set firmer, iirc.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What sort of shelf life do you need on this piece?  I'm wondering if you cut back on the cocoa butter and added a bit more of some other liquid to help with the emulsion.  What actual chocolate are you using - I find that some of the more acidic formulations are difficult to get into a good emulsion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The more movement your ganache gets, the finer the emulsion will be and the smoother the mouth feel will be. Try blitzing it with a stick blender or a food processor. This will also cause it to set firmer, iirc.

I thought too much agitation breaks the emulsion? So can I blitz it and then add the hazelnut chunks after?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kerry, shelf life is not a factor. They don't generally last more than three days lol!

The chocolate is not particularly acidic, it's the lowest dark chocolate the 55% or whatever I'll check it when I'm near it.

I think it's the way I incorporated the butter that may have broken the emulsion. I think I should add the butter after I've incorporated the cream into the chocolate. But this doesn't explain why I couldn't fix it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Typical sequence: Bring cream/glucose to simmer, very short rest (:30), pour over chocolate, short rest (:60), mix - like said above, I use either my food processor or a stick blender. I never stir by hand. Try it again and see if you never truly got the emulsion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Typical sequence: Bring cream/glucose to simmer, very short rest (:30), pour over chocolate, short rest (:60), mix - like said above, I use either my food processor or a stick blender. I never stir by hand. Try it again and see if you never truly got the emulsion.

 

Funny you should say that because I always mix by hand and as of late haven't had issues with improper emulsions, other than with my dairy free ones sometimes and I think that's a balance issue more than an emulsion issue.  I'm sure once I graduate to larger batches I'll forgo hand-mixing, but for now it's all I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys,

 

 

So I'm still trying to improve the above and still no luck. It's still not a smooth emulsion. I made it today as below. I used gfron's method. I added the glucose syrup and cocoa butter to the cream and stirred it continuously as it simmered for less than a minute. I used a stick blender but it didn't work out that well so I stirred with a spatula. I have no idea what's wrong!  

 

250g dark chocolate

250g double cream

.5 ounce cocoa butter

.25 ounce butter

.5 ounce glucose syrup

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll watch as others answer, but ratios are often not as important to getting the emulsion. I say this because you'll see all sorts of recipe with wildly varying ratios of chocolate to fat. Temperature is a big factor and fat content, but the formula you used isn't mine, just one I've passed along and it works. Also, as you advance, there are very precise formulas that include the temperature of the cream before it hits the chocolate. 

 

On a long shot - was the chocolate old or previously used where it might have been out of temper itself with bloom?


Edited by gfron1 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll take a shot--It looks like your process is ok up until you start mixing. If stirring by hand, start in the center of the bowl and stir, stir, stir in a small circle. After a few minutes, you will see a swirly pattern start where the dark chocolate is forming a star shape in the cream. Keep stirring and enlarge the circle until all the cream has been incorporated. This should give you a good emulsion. I don't understand how using a stick blender didn't work for you. If you do the same thing and put the stick in the center and leave it there until the emulsion starts, then move it around, it should do the same thing. Good luck.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always used a food processor and never have had problems.  I'd rather mix by hand than use an immersion blender

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys,

 

 

So I'm still trying to improve the above and still no luck. It's still not a smooth emulsion. I made it today as below. I used gfron's method. I added the glucose syrup and cocoa butter to the cream and stirred it continuously as it simmered for less than a minute. I used a stick blender but it didn't work out that well so I stirred with a spatula. I have no idea what's wrong!  

 

I don't think this could be the problem, but I have never seen a ganache recipe call for heating cocoa butter with the cream.  You may be getting the cocoa butter too warm at that early stage, and then you are mixing that (perhaps unemulsified) mixture into chocolate (more fat, needing more emulsification).  All recipes I have seen that call for adding cocoa butter say to add it after you have formed the emulsion with cream and chocolate; if that initial emulsion has formed successfully, adding some more fat should not be a problem.  If you are getting separation of the fat, you could try adding drops of skim milk with an immersion blender to bring the emulsion back (to give credit where it's due, I think I got that idea from Kerry Beal).  I don't want to jinx my future efforts, but I will say that I have never had this method fail--even with Valrhona's temperamental Opalys white chocolate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually mix in a figure 8 pattern.

 

I did worry that adding the cocoa butter to the cream might be a problem. So should I melt it and add it in after the emulsion has formed, like I do with butter?

 

The chocolate was fresh from the box, in temper pellets.

 

The stick blender didn't work maybe because there wasn't enough in the bowl, it was having trouble. Or maybe it's because it's a bad quality stick blender :-) I don't have a food processor. So I'm stuck with perfecting this by hand.

 

The ganache looks grainy, it's not smooth and shiny.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I add butter to a ganache, I do not melt it. I start with the chocolate and cream, get those in an emulsion and then add the room temperature/softened butter and stir it in.

I tend to mix by hand, starting in the center and working my way out (as Ruth described up thread). If the hand mixing is not working, I may bring out the stick blender. Also, if it won't emulsify, I will slowly add a liquid (something that works with the flavor of the ganache) that contains little or no fat (a similar process to fixing a broken mayonnaise).

What happens if you try cutting down the cream in your recipe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It also broke when I used a 2:1 chocolate to cream ratio... that's why I initially thought there was to much fat in the recipe because the cream vs chocolate proportion doesn't seem to matter.

 

Yes, I also don't melt the butter before adding to the ganache but I thought you have to melt cocoa butter first, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said before, every recipe I have seen that calls for added cocoa butter says to melt it separately and add it after the cream+chocolate emulsion has been formed.  Actually most of the recipes that do have added cocoa butter are ones that are fruit-flavored and use white chocolate.  I have always assumed the reason was that the cocoa butter gives more "body" to the ganache without adding more chocolate so as to let the fruit flavor shine through.  You could try leaving it out of your recipe and increase the amount of chocolate accordingly.

 

Another idea:  Grainy ganache can result from having the liquid significantly cooler than the chocolate (so that the latter does not get melted properly).  I have just about given up on the "pour hot liquid over solid chocolate and stir like mad" method, and instead I melt the chocolate (at least partially) and get it and the liquid at more or less the same temp before mixing them, but you don't want the liquid cooler.  Even so, I would think that heating up the ganache gently would take care of the graininess.  I would also get a properly sized container and make enough ganache so that an immersion blender can be used successfully.  It is your friend.

 

Just some thoughts on the mysteries of ganache.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...