• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

schneich

Ganache: Tips, Techniques & Troubleshooting

610 posts in this topic

It was 5 oz cream, 9 oz dark chocolate 64%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how did you process it? by hand or machine?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By hand. I heated the cream, added to the chocolate, waited one minute and then mixed by hand. It didn't seem broken when I piped it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Perhaps adding some glucose syrup to the recipe would help by preventing crystalization of the sugar in the chocolate.  Greweling recommends between 10 and 40 percent glucose relative to the weight of cream.  I usually use 20-25%.  So for your recipe, you could use 1 to 1.25 oz of glucose syrup.  You can also use corn syrup instead of glucose syrup (essentially the same thing except for maybe a different water content or dextrose equivalent).

 

Add the glucose to the cream before heating it so it dissolves into the cream, then add to the chocolate as usual.


Edited by jim loellbach (log)
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Jumping on board keychris's thought, if I ever make a dark chocolate ganache (especially over 60%) I use either an immersion/stick blender or a food processor to emulsify to prevent separation.


Edited by gap (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hah, you beat me to it Gap! Using a stick blender or a food processor will give you a more stable emulsion as the fat and water particles will be more evenly dispersed.

 

To 99% of the customers that will eat your product though, they wouldn't even notice that the ganache was a problem, they would just think it was part of what you were aiming for - I tasted a friend's rose ganache once that had grains in it, I thought they were an interesting textural component until I asked her how she did it and she's like "what grains? I didn't put anything textural in there!" So long as it still tastes good, don't worry be happy is my motto :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Don't worry be happy" love it! lol! But I'm an amateur trying to learn and trying not to be dissuaded by every little thing going wrong. I guess I should look at the bright side, this batch showcased the best tempering I've ever managed :biggrin:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I should add glucose syrup.. I never knew why it was added so I just don't bother. I'll go back to bothering ;-) 

 

AND I'll give the immersion blender another go... first attempt with that didn't work out well so I abandoned it. I figured it would work better when you're making a large quantity. hmm what about using the actual blender?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are going to emulsify a ganache by hand, just be sure to start in the center and use small tight (fast) circles until the emulsion 'takes', then keep that circular motion going (think whirlpool) and watch the emulsion spread through your ganache...most people when doing it by hand just mix the ingredients without that tight circular motion. Emulsion requires centrifugal force (eg, food processor, stick blender) but can easily be done properly by hand in the quantities you mentioned.


Stu Jordan - Chocolatier

_______________________________________________

Kako Chocolate: Where Art & Chocolate Meet

Wholesale - Chocolate School - Chocolate Making Equipment

www.kako.co.nz www.sweetest.co.nz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.