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Vietnamese Food


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I'm revisiting this thread after some time away and have decided that this weekend i must try one of your recipes, Guppymo. The hard part will be deciding between one of the soups (always a weakness) or the "Com Suong Bi Cha" grilled lemongrass pork or the "Ga Xe Phay" chicken salad.

I'm especially excited because they all look relatively simple and I'll get some practice in experimenting with fish sauce.


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This is a fascinating and informative thread - thanks so much for posting these recipes. I intend to try them soon - the Vietnamese restaurants here in Hong Kong are not very good, although one advantage of living here is that it's just a 2 1/2 hour flight to Vietnam.

Would you have a recipe for Vietnamese head cheese? I'm sorry, but I don't know the Vietnamese name for this. A friend back in San Francisco gave me a recipe which I made several times. I unfortunately lost the recipe. As I remember, it was made with pig's feet, pig's ears, fish sauce and lots of sliced garlic. The meat was cooked and pulled off the bones, then the cooking liquid, sliced meat and all the other ingredients were put in a terrine mould and steamed. The gelatine from the bones made it solidify when cool. It was excellent. I can't find a recipe for this in cookbooks, although I have seen recipes for a meat "terrine" that calls for the meats to be ground and then mixed with egg and steamed.

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Guppymo,

Thank you for identifying taro stem. I see it often but could never get a name for it. So, what do you do with it? I am loving this thread more each page. :rolleyes:

If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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Guppymo,

Thank you for identifying taro stem.  I see it often but could never get a name for it.  So, what do you do with it?  I am loving this thread more each page. :rolleyes:

I used it in the soup above.

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Thanks again for this thread, guppymo. I saw whole stingray at the fish counter last night. Previously I've only had it bbq'd with chili paste on banana leaves in Singapore, but your soup really looks good. Another request for a recipe, please :rolleyes:

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Guppymo, I'll add my thanks for this thread.

Can I add a request also? :rolleyes:

Please, some recipe for the marinated carrots - I found out that they're marinated in a water-vinegar-sugar solution, but I'd much appreciate a ratio and also, what kind of vinegar? I'd guess rice vinegar, but I want to make sure. I'm talking about the strips of carrot and daikon that come with lettuce for a variety of dishes in vietnamese restaurants. Thank you in advance.

That stingray soup looks amazing, as does everything else - please keep them coming. :wub:

The human mouth is called a pie hole. The human being is called a couch potato... They drive the food, they wear the food... That keeps the food hot, that keeps the food cold. That is the altar where they worship the food, that's what they eat when they've eaten too much food, that gets rid of the guilt triggered by eating more food. Food, food, food... Over the Hedge
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I've had taro root many times but have never knowingly had taro stem. Can you describe the taste? And can it be eaten raw like celery, or does it have to be cooked?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I've had taro root many times but have never knowingly had taro stem. Can you describe the taste? And can it be eaten raw like celery, or does it have to be cooked?

Pan,

Have you ever eaten shredded banana trunk before ? It tastes like that j/k. It can be eaten raw, I like to thin slice it and mix with other herbs and eat with dipping sauce. It's soft yet crunchy and it does not have any weird after taste.

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Thanks again for this thread, guppymo.  I saw whole stingray at the fish counter last night.  Previously I've only had it bbq'd  with chili paste on banana leaves in Singapore, but your soup really looks good.  Another request for a recipe, please  :rolleyes:

Spaghettti,

Yeah, I had the stingray sambal in Singapore too and it's spicy and good. Last summer I tried to imitate cooking that dish at home with banana leaves and it turned out to be not bad. It's so fortunate that not a lot people eat stingray in Boston and yet there's a market that sells stingray at cheap price :raz:

Anyway,here is the recipe

Enjoy !

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Guppymo, I'll add my thanks for this thread.

Can I add a request also?  :rolleyes:

Please, some recipe for the marinated carrots - I found out that they're marinated in a water-vinegar-sugar solution, but I'd much appreciate a ratio and also, what kind of vinegar? I'd guess rice vinegar, but I want to make sure. I'm talking about the strips of carrot and daikon that come with lettuce for a variety of dishes in vietnamese restaurants. Thank you in advance.

That stingray soup looks amazing, as does everything else - please keep them coming.  :wub:

Mistinguett,

Here is the recipe you requested

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Okie, here are some more Vietnamese dishes

Anchovy with chilli and fish sauce

IMG_3642.jpg

Banh Beo (steamed rice flour with dried shrimp - Hue style)

banhbeo2.jpg

Banh Nam - steamed rice flour cake wrapped with banana leaves

IMG_3539.jpg

Bo nuong la lot - grilled beef wrapped in wild betel leaves

diacom2.jpg

Be Thui - Smoked veal sashimi salad

IMG_2591.jpg

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I've had taro root many times but have never knowingly had taro stem. Can you describe the taste? And can it be eaten raw like celery, or does it have to be cooked?

Pan,

Have you ever eaten shredded banana trunk before ?[...]

I don't think so, only bananas and banana flowers (jantung pisang in Malay).

In the bo nuong la lot (grilled beef wrapped in wild betel leaves), do you eat the betel leaves? Are they at all narcotic? And please tell us something about the provenance of the wild leaves you use. Do they actually gather them in some jungle or something, dry them, and fly them to the US?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Anybody wants to take a guess what vegetable was used in this stir-fried dish ?

I had one hot bowl of Jasmine rice and worked my way through almost the entire dish for dinner tonight :)

IMG_3516.jpg

This looks delicious! How was this prepared? I'm a novice when it comes to this cuisine and am trying to learn more.

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I've had taro root many times but have never knowingly had taro stem. Can you describe the taste? And can it be eaten raw like celery, or does it have to be cooked?

Pan,

Have you ever eaten shredded banana trunk before ?[...]

I don't think so, only bananas and banana flowers (jantung pisang in Malay).

In the bo nuong la lot (grilled beef wrapped in wild betel leaves), do you eat the betel leaves? Are they at all narcotic? And please tell us something about the provenance of the wild leaves you use. Do they actually gather them in some jungle or something, dry them, and fly them to the US?

Pan,

La lot or wild betel leaves grow everywhere in Vietnam. Growing up there I used to go to my backyard to collect them for my mom. I have no idea of what substances are in it but our ancestors ate them and I have had any bad symptoms after eating them hehe :wacko:

I think those aren't necessarily gathered in the jungle and flown here, I guess in the US they are grown in the farms somewhere in the south like Florida, Texas, California ? Maybe we should call them "Farm raised betel leaves" ?

Gup

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Guppymo, the Be Thui looks absolutely fantastic. Would you be so kind as to post a recipe for it? Your photos and explanations are wonderful, so wonderful that I think I hall begin to try and add some of these dishes to my repretoire. I haven't had a lot of Vietnamese food, but I've really loved everything I've tried....time to expand.

Barbara Laidlaw aka "Jake"

Good friends help you move, real friends help you move bodies.

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Jake,

Thanks ! But I need to take a picture of the special bottle of sauce used in this recipe, and the bag of roasted rice powder. Once I gather these items I will post everything. Sorry, this dish is the only dish that I have not prepared the materials for the recipe.

Gup

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My GOD! That looks sooo good!

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Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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wow, I found this thread today, it all looks soo good. Mo what are the pickles called? the ones with carrots and dikon? do you make them at home or buy them? you thread has been so outstandingly lovely and tasty, I'm sure! keep up the good work.

does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

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wow, I found this thread today, it all looks soo good. Mo what are the pickles called? the ones with carrots and dikon? do you make them at home or buy them? you thread has been so outstandingly lovely and tasty, I'm sure! keep up the good work.

Luckylies -

The pickled daikon and carrots is called "Cu cai ca rot chua" :blink:

I made them at home, it's very easy to make and you can make a big jar within a short amount of time. Check out the recipe here

I am glad you enjoy the thread, thanks.

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