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Foie Gras: Recipes


phlawless
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After a long whole-house renovation finally having a home gathering on Saturday for 40 fully catered.  I am, however, making some canapés with the foie gras shown below of which I have two (will have to read up on how to freeze some of it for later).  

 

I've made the brioche which I will toast, cut in 4 triangles, and place a half moon of the Foie on each one.  Then I wondered I needed to top these as I feel the creaminess and richness would require something.  Some of the suggestions were small chop of green apple tossed in lemon juice with a little balsamic reduction.  Another one was caramelized onions.  And, yet another, was some small chop of macadamia.

 

I'd like to keep it simple.

 

After starting to worry about this I remembered egullet.  The perfect place for such a question -- the ultimate "I could'av had a V-8 moment."  :)

 

Please, any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

IMG_0999.jpg

IMG_0999.jpg

And I want a table for two and a chicken for eight o'clock.

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possibly a riff--on a mini beef wellington

 

Puff pastry (ish )-mushroom dux -foie and a real slice of blck truffle --something on foie to make truffle slice stick?

 

Just a weird idea

 

Sometimes.   .I will go to a camera site..  " Flickr.com "  in the search box type Foie  and look at picturs of others creations and some have explainations.

 

good luck

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

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  • 2 months later...

Hi All,

 

My mother's birthday is coming up and she asked that I make foie gras for her, since she's never had it.  I've ordered a Grade A - 2 lb. whole liver from Hudson Valley, and was wondering if I could get some ideas for preparation.  My plan is to do 3 or 4 composed plates.  I'm thinking of doing the Gewurztraminer poached foie with pickled cherries and the seared foie with lobster and fig, both from the French Laundry cookbook.  Anyone else have some good ideas?  She's up for almost anything, so let me know what you think!
 

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Some years ago, in a rare fit of decadence, I made a foie gras mousse using a lovely Pommeau - a blend of 2/3 heirloom apple cider and 1/3 apple brandy - that I found.  Maye that will give you some ideas.

 ... Shel


 

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Although I have a weakness for foie gras in any way, for me, nothing beats a terrine mi cuit. And if I never had it before, that's in my opinion the best way to sample it. I remember looking for help here cooking foie gras at the beginning, it takes a little practice.

My preferred way is whole foie gras cooked in salt. I adored the texture and no waste.

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Although I have a weakness for foie gras in any way, for me, nothing beats a terrine mi cuit. And if I never had it before, that's in my opinion the best way to sample it. I remember looking for help here cooking foie gras at the beginning, it takes a little practice.

My preferred way is whole foie gras cooked in salt. I adored the texture and no waste.

 

How do you do the salt-cooked foie gras?  I've got a whole one kicking around the freezer, and I've been wondering what to do with it.

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How do you do the salt-cooked foie gras?  I've got a whole one kicking around the freezer, and I've been wondering what to do with it.

 

Very simple, I do the usual marinade in salt, sugar, wine of choice after deveining . Wrap tightly with a gauze an bury it in coarse salt. About 2 hours for each 100 g of foie gras. So a 600g about 12 hours. Best after 3-4 days. The outside oxidize a little bit on the outside.

If you look for foie gras cuit au sel on line you'll find a big range of curing times, I even saw cooked in salt for 48 hours! I cannot imagine how salty it would be.

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I got a similar request for a dinner my mother was hosting. Because of the richness of the foie I served an Amuse plate.  The foie was served two ways,  a lightly poached torchon (one of Keller's books), and a quick seared peice.  Rare duck breast .made it an all duck amuse.  Rounding out the plate was a small arugula salad with poached/seared leek and a slice of fresh bread.. Sauce was pomegranite and balsamic reduction with some blackberries.  .It did not suck.   (though my plating and photo skills could use some help)

 

 

Amuse @ Mom Dinner.jpg

 

Critical to success with any foie gras is de-veining the foie.  The first lobe I tried to do per cookbook instruction and failed.  Thus the torchon.  The second lobe I sought advice from a Chef/friend and was able to de-vein cleanly.  (Position lobe upside down, use parer to cut out largest vein and any large off shoots, live with the rest)  He also advised to sear in a dry pan and be ready to drain off a lot more fat than I would expect.  The rest was easy squeezy. 

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks everyone!  This is great advice.  

 

Very simple, I do the usual marinade in salt, sugar, wine of choice after deveining . Wrap tightly with a gauze an bury it in coarse salt. About 2 hours for each 100 g of foie gras. So a 600g about 12 hours. Best after 3-4 days. The outside oxidize a little bit on the outside.

If you look for foie gras cuit au sel on line you'll find a big range of curing times, I even saw cooked in salt for 48 hours! I cannot imagine how salty it would be.

 

Franci - is this basically salt cured foie?  I'm very interested in this!  I've decided to do 4 plates, each with a different preparation (poached, seared, terrine mi cult, and ?), so this could be the last.  Am I correct in that it seems this is uncooked?

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Very simple, I do the usual marinade in salt, sugar, wine of choice after deveining . Wrap tightly with a gauze an bury it in coarse salt. About 2 hours for each 100 g of foie gras. So a 600g about 12 hours. Best after 3-4 days. The outside oxidize a little bit on the outside.

If you look for foie gras cuit au sel on line you'll find a big range of curing times, I even saw cooked in salt for 48 hours! I cannot imagine how salty it would be.

 

That sounds great.  How does the texture compare to a torchon or mi-cuit?

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One of my favourite preparations is to melt the foie in a Bain Marie, season with a touch of salt, white pepper and calvados, pass and then whisk over ice, I pop it in a kitchen aid with the balloon whisk and a bowl of ice beneath the bowl, it will create a whipped foie gras, that once cool is nice to quenelle or pipe

I love it served in something hot like a rich cauliflower soup, where it slowly melts adding that great flavour to the dish (makes a great canapé in a Demi tasse)

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Franci - is this basically salt cured foie?  I'm very interested in this!  I've decided to do 4 plates, each with a different preparation (poached, seared, terrine mi cult, and ?), so this could be the last.  Am I correct in that it seems this is uncooked?

 

Yes, is uncooked. 

That sounds great.  How does the texture compare to a torchon or mi-cuit?

 

Not that different. I think it all depends on how long you decide to cure in the salt, it will affect the texture of the foie gras.

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