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Freckles

Salon International de l'Agriculture Paris FebMar

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Bonjour! I'll be attending the Salon Internationale de l'Agriculture a Paris on Tuesday. I've never gone in the past, or even considered going, but I've been told that it's a fabulous place to sample good wines and cheeses... :biggrin: Have any of you ever attended, or have any suggestions of what I should check out? Thanks.

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Bonjour!  I'll be attending the Salon Internationale de l'Agriculture a Paris on Tuesday.  I've never gone in the past, or even considered going, but I've been told that it's a fabulous place to sample good wines and cheeses... :biggrin:   Have any of you ever attended, or have any suggestions of what I should check out?  Thanks.

Well, first off, it's vast in several different halls but there's some sort of shuttle bus this year between buildings. Second, unless you're an animal freak, after you've seen a couple of cows, sheep, etc, it's not terribly exciting there. But third, you certainly can taste a lot of wine and food from various regions and there are a lot of temporary utilitarian restos serving very big portions of stuff your cardiologist would not approve of. And today, in “Vivre Aujourd’hui” in Le Figaro, Alexandra Michot has an article on funny products (e.g. catsup of cassis), temporary restaurants (e.g. Thoumieux) and interesting culinary displays/demonstrations/etc (e.g. fruit sculpture and flavored milk). Last time I went there, there were even some very rustic looking clothes for sale. Check out the website that Bux put up on the Calendar for more info. Have fun. It's wild.

Edited by John Talbott for grammar gaffes.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I'm posting from the Salon - where the press office is in fact in the big animals hall. Not only can you get your picture taken with a furry white two month-old Charolais calf but learn to respect the many lives that will be taken for our gastronomic pleasure. You can also buy milk from the cows at the salon - milked and pasteurised - minimally to preserve the taste - from the very same day. Be sure to go to Hall 7.1 - the food from all the regions of France.

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Discount Tickets for the Salon d'Agriculture in Paris:

I was on the metro and saw an ad for Tele 7 Jours (a tv guide, available at most kiosks I guess). There is a coupon on the outside of the magazine (which costs 95 centimes) that is '1 entrée achetée =1 entrée offerte'--I'm going to use mine this week.

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i am soooooo jealous of you all going to the salon......

i'm stuck in britain with a pile of work.......in the back of my mind is the thought that maybe, just maybe i could nip onto eurostar and do my work as i get there and get back, but i know that once i'm in paris i'll be toooooo distracted (always am).

i love the salon de l'agriculture.

sniff, (little tear forming), have fun for me! pet a sheep, eat a salami, check out the ornamental chickens........

marlena


Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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Tried searching in the forum for this without success, though I know you have discussed it.

Other than looking is there much tasting? Samples? Unusual offerings?

What I did learn by googling is

Salon International de l'Agriculture

http://www.salon-agriculture.com/

DATES

Du 25 février au 5 mars 2006

HORAIRES

De 9h à 19h

NOCTURNE

Vendredi 3 mars jusqu'à 22h

LIEU

Paris expo, Porte de Versailles

75015 Paris

Plan d’accès

MOYENS D'ACCES

Métro : ligne 12, station Porte de Versailles

ligne 8, station Balard

Bus : lignes 80 et PC, arrêt Porte de Versailles

RER : ligne C, station Boulevard Victor

ACCES

Entrée visiteurs : portes A, D, F, K, L, T, V

Entrée groupes : porte K

PARKING VISITEURS

3 parkings sont à votre disposition : C, F et R.

Pour plus d’informations : visiteurs@comexpo-paris.com

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Tried searching in the forum for this without success, though I know you have discussed it. 

Other than looking is there much tasting?  Samples?  Unusual offerings? 

I've added some more information about the Salon in the "What's Happening/Paris event section HERE


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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Is anyone planning to go this year? Can anyone who has gone previously give me an indication as to what to expect?

I gather there are free (?) samples to eat there. Are things given or sold to take away as well? Fowl has fled. Cheeses should still be chosen. Are meats cooked for sampling? What about fruits & veggies, as well as preserves of various animal & vegetable sorts? The website has the names of purveyors, but rarely what is purveyed and the terms of its acquisition.

Sunday, the last day of the fair, is the day of my arrival. Aside from jet lag and too many other things already on my agenda, I am trying to decide whether or not the fair would be worth the schlep to Porte Versailles in what will be a cold day, if less wet than Saturday.

For Sunday already planned is shopping at the Raspail Organic Market, salt-marsh lamb purchase, and an early dinner with friends. The Fair/Salon would conflict with a concert and museum visit my wife would like in the mid-afternoon, so if we decide to go separate ways for a few hours, the case for doing so must be strong.

Even if the Salon is great I may be too pooped to enjoy it so that is another consideration.

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Is anyone planning to go this year?  Can anyone who has gone previously give me an indication as to what to expect?

I gather there are free (?) samples to eat there.  Are things given or sold to take away as well?  Fowl has fled.  Cheeses should still be chosen.  Are meats cooked for sampling?  What about fruits & veggies, as well as preserves of various animal & vegetable sorts?  The website has the names of purveyors, but rarely what is purveyed and the terms of its acquisition. 

Sunday, the last day of the fair, is the day of my arrival.  Aside from jet lag and too many other things already on my agenda, I am trying to decide whether or not the fair would be worth the schlep to Porte Versailles in what will be a cold day, if less wet than Saturday. 

For Sunday already planned is shopping at the Raspail Organic Market, salt-marsh lamb purchase, and an early dinner with friends.  The Fair/Salon would conflict with a concert and museum visit my wife would like in the mid-afternoon, so if we decide to go separate ways for a few hours, the case for doing so must be strong.

Even if the Salon is great I may be too pooped to enjoy it so that is another consideration.

Oh boy, I think only a marriage counsellor should answer your question.

But by the end of your post I think you answered it yourself.

Is it worth it vs your wife's plans? No.

I think the Salon is fun to go to once in a lifetime if you have loads of time, like State Fairs and want to chow down to some simple but hearty fare. I don't recall many samples, and if sampling wine, I feel obliged to buy and schlep some home.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I agree with John. I went last year and had a fun time, but don't feel compelled to go this year. Also, I went on a Sunday and it was so crowded there were areas where you could barely walk. I do remember having a really great foie gras sandwhich though. If you are still here next weekend, why not go to the Salon Fermier instead?


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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Our very own Ptipois, who is without a doubt the most knowledgeable person I know regarding food culture and history—French and otherwise-, will be at the Salon d'Agriculture this Friday giving a cooking demonstration using cheese from the Auvergne region of France.

Recipes include

Crème de Saint-Nectaire fermier, royales à la fourme d’Ambert

Tuiles sablées au Cantal vieux

Paquets de chou au Cantal jeune

Friday 29 February, 10am-1pm

Hall 7-2

Stand 8 allée C

Paris Expo, Porte de Versailles, Paris 15th.

Metro : Porte de Versailles, Balard.

For more information:

www.fromages-aoc-auvergne.com

www.fromages-aoc-auvergne.com/Chez-Ptipois


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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Our very own Ptipois, who is without a doubt the most knowledgeable person I know regarding food culture and history—French and otherwise-, will be at the Salon d'Agriculture this Friday giving a cooking demonstration using cheese from the Auvergne region of France. 

Recipes include

Crème de Saint-Nectaire fermier, royales à la fourme d’Ambert

Well, when I went she was waiting for the Agricultural Minister to show up to go into full swing, so I just had a bite of cheese and made a tour of Building 7.2 which was huge and afforded me a nice sampling of appetizers. When I returned to her stand, she was finishing the "Crème de Saint-Nectaire fermier, royales à la fourme d’Ambert" and she put a little sprig of Chinese seaweed in my cup and it was divine. Ms. Pti sure knows how to chef.
Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Thank you John, I am so glad you came to the Fromages d'Auvergne stand! And that you got a sip of the soup.

The dish was also quite successful with monsieur le Ministre, who showed his knowledge of old-fashioned French politesse by kissing the cook.

Later I made little cabbage parcels filled with diced Cantal cheese, ham and apple, and slowly roasted in butter. That was appreciated too.

Recipes on my blog soon.

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