Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

LindyCat

Making Maraschino Cherries

Recommended Posts

I want to go the alcoholic route. Why kirsch over maraschino, the higher ABV? And sounds like no pitting for me then!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to go the alcoholic route. Why kirsch over maraschino, the higher ABV? And sounds like no pitting for me then!

maraschino liqueur is basically kirschwasser + sugar with a little extra almond aroma. the hiram walker product is definitely more affordable than luxardo maraschino and allows you to control your own sugar content so you fruit does not shrivel. luxardo maraschino probably has twice the sugar content you have a looking for. I'd love some feed back on my recipe because I don't think anybody has actually attempted it. its pretty elaborate but you can cut lots of corners if you want to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 14th exercise in my Distiller's Workbook covers making maraschino cherries and also contrasts alcoholic versions with non-alcoholic versions. The exercise covers a lot of variables but you can really skip many of them if you want to keep it simple. The base spirit in the recipe is Hiram Walker Kirschwasser and not maraschino liqueur. also if you go the alcoholic route you don't want to pit because without sulfites and chloride bleach brines you will end up with unsightly enzymatic browning.

 

Regarding the browning, wouldn't lowering the pH a bit prevent that, while adding a bit of welcome tartness?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is sugar necessary?

 

the liquid needs to match the sugar content of the cherries, too much and they will shrivel, too little and they will swell. narly maraschino cherries have sugar contents far higher than the cherries begin with and they walk it up in 30 g/L increments so everything can come to equilibrium with out damaging cells.

 

with my first experiments I just googled the known sugar content of the cherry type I was using instead of using a refractometer and it worked well. you will find that you don't have uniform ripeness and some cherries will float to the top and the exposed sides will brown. you can separate those into their own small jar with a little less sugar so they don't float, or you can slowly walk the sugar content up to try and make them absorb it and become uniform.

 

for a while I was using canning jars vacuumed with the canning jar attachment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding the browning, wouldn't lowering the pH a bit prevent that, while adding a bit of welcome tartness?

 

I definitely don't know the science of the browning inside and out, I took all the information from the one credit course on maraschino cherry making at Oregon State University.

 

I think they lower the pH to limit any microbial growth and still have browning problems. their process is pretty darn involved and I suspect they have systematically tried everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I came across this thread when researching in preparation for a first try at the Aviation cocktail. Having obtained the necessary liquid ingredients for that cocktail I attempted to order a jar of Luxardo cherries, only to find that supplies listed last week are gone and no-one currently appears to offer them at a price I am willing to pay.

We have a bottle of bright red factory produced cherries for our first Aviation attempts.

Having read this thread we intend following Jacques Pepin's method to prepare our own for later.

I would welcome any advice in respect of the alcohol best used. While thinking about this I remembered that I have a bottle of apple eau de vie given to me years ago by my neighbour when I was living in France. This was home (farm) made in 1975 when growers were still permitted to distil for their own and family consumption. I also have a litre of kirsch bought cheaply in a French supermarket last year; also an alternative maraschino liqueur bought at a shop that didn't have Luxardo when I was hunting that down.

This photo (I hope) shows the cherries we plan to bottle and the various liquids we might include in the process (or not, eg the violette, I just wanted all Aviation inspired purchases in the picture as a record of the process towards this cocktail).

I guess this might be the one and only use for the eau de vie which I recall being told is extremely potent. Even then I'm not sure that an apple based spirit will be appropriate. Perhaps combined with the non Luxardo maraschino?

image.jpg


Edited by DianaB (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like a mix of Maraschino liqueur and a dark cherry brandy a la Heering. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like a mix of Maraschino liqueur and a dark cherry brandy a la Heering. 

 

Makin' cherries now?

 

 

How many cherries are in a jar of Luxardo cherries? They're about $20 a pop here...I'd like to know the cost per cherry...


Edited by Hassouni (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While thinking about this I remembered that I have a bottle of apple eau de vie given to me years ago by my neighbour when I was living in France. This was home (farm) made in 1975 when growers were still permitted to distil for their own and family consumption.

 

....

I guess this might be the one and only use for the eau de vie which I recall being told is extremely potent. Even then I'm not sure that an apple based spirit will be appropriate. Perhaps combined with the non Luxardo maraschino?

 

I would save that apple eau de vie for the future. if you get deep enough into spirits and cocktails you will realize you have something astoundingly special and eventually you will be ready to drink it. there will be quite a few beautiful uses for it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually it's still legal, but you have to pay taxes and there are a bunch of rules of course.

 

I agree with bostonapothecary. Save this eau de vie. What I would do is pour a little bit in a small cup and smell it. If it's good, you will get a fresh apple flavor. Then, if you are feeling brave, you can try it neat. Otherwise, you can always dip a sugar cube in it briefly ("faire un canard") and eat it - most people enjoy that.

 

Where are you located? Luxardo maraschino cherries are available in most gourmet stores these days.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've made them a couple of years ago but recently got hooked on the Luxardo Maraschino cherries after barrel aging Manhattans and after shelling out for a small jar, went ahead and ordered a 6.6 lb can off Amazon.   I'll be up to my elbows in Maraschino cherries for a long time.  3 14 oz jars was about the same cost as the 6.6 lb can.  Figure the syrup is so thick that they will last a long time in the fridge without a loss of quality.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, scubadoo97 said:

Figure the syrup is so thick that they will last a long time in the fridge without a loss of quality.

The last jar I saw warned not to store in the fridge because the syrup may crystallize. But I think the shelf life is still quite long on these.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Craig E said:

The last jar I saw warned not to store in the fridge because the syrup may crystallize. But I think the shelf life is still quite long on these.

 

Yes, in my experience, the syrup crystalizes when stored in the fridge.  It goes back into solution on warming but if it's just me, I scoop one out without bothering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Craig E said:

The last jar I saw warned not to store in the fridge because the syrup may crystallize. But I think the shelf life is still quite long on these.

Thanks for the warning.  I'm near the end of the jar in the fridge but have not had the crystallization issue.  Maybe we are going through them at a good clip.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×