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Sausage Varieties


UkFoodie
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Hi all....

I've been tasked with creating some new sasuage varities....

I need weird or wonderful suggestions....

i'm stuck with in an asian theme....

salmon, wasabi & pickled ginger

duck, soy, ginger & spring onion

chicken, cocunut, lime leaf and lemongrass.

any other combinations?

Edited by UkFoodie (log)
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Hi all....

I've been tasked with creating some new sasuage varities....

I need weird or wonderful suggestions.... 

i'm stuck with in an asian theme....

salmon, wasabi & pickled ginger

duck, soy, ginger & spring onion

chicken, cocunut, lime leaf and lemongrass.

any other combinations?

Also looking for Non asian flavours.....

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How about a red-eye gravy-inspired type of thing? Ham fat, black boiled coffee, and chili flakes?

Or a chipotle and cocoa powder theme with lots of garlic and port

Or, honey, dried mustard, and lemon juice?

These would be pork and/or duck in my mind's palate.

Edited by jsolomon (log)

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Black boiled coffee

Interesting..... Can you explain a bit more.... Use the coffee as i would port,wine etc?

Or a chipotle and cocoa powder theme with lots of garlic and port

Was thinking about this combo making with turkey.... doing a take on Mole... adding some ground almonds to help bind it.

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Black boiled coffee

Interesting..... Can you explain a bit more.... Use the coffee as i would port,wine etc?

I think we're on the same page. Take some brewed coffee of the volume you would add to moisten the amount of sausage you're thinking of making. Preferably, the coffee should be strong, and day-old or so. Toss it in a saucepan and heat it to boiling so it's really scary-tasting. Then, let cool and add to your sausage mixture.

Even better is if the coffee is reduced by about 1/4 to the volume you're thinking of using (i.e. 400 ml to 300 ml)

If you have more questions, we might want to try to bring Varmint into the discussion.... he's a red-eye gravy guru from my understanding.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Duck, pork, pork fat, duck or chicken livers, pistachios, salt, pepper, quartre épices or allspice, and a little Madeira.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Bacon. Seriously.

Dark meat, sour cherries, mustard, and bacon.

But, how did I know it would be Al who would make that suggestion? :cool:

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Thanks for all the great suggestions.... Keep them coming!

Lamb sausage. Use North African spices, maybe cumin, coriander, caraway add some pine nuts and fruit (prunes or dates). Lots of garlic of course, maybe some herbs such as thyme or cilantro.

Already doing a Merguez, Lamb, harissa, paprika, garlic, cumin & corriander (cilantro)

Lamb, Pinenuts, Dates, cumin, corriander..... sounding good!

Edited by UkFoodie (log)
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NC BBQ -

Smoked Pork (or just pork and smoke the sausage), crushed red pepper, mustard powder, and vinegar.

Buffalo Chicken -

Chicken meat, hot sauce,garlic, black pepper, and blue cheese crumbles

Greek -

Lamb meat, oregano, lemon juice, feta, yogurt

Chesapeake Bay -

Lump crab meat, old bay seasoning, chives, anything you would toss into a crabcake

Liver and Onion Sausage (with bacon of course)

Cheesesteak Sausage -

Ground ribeye (or finely chopped), onion, provolone (or whiz)

Gumbo in a sausage -

Pork, duck, or crawfish, okra, onion, celery, bell pepper, and creole/cajun spice blend

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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chicken, onion, paprika, sage

pork, cherry, leek, garlic, white pepper, chervil

veal, lemon zest, black pepper, red chile pepper (lemongrass)

turkey, porkfat, roast elephant garlic, carmelized yellow pepper

duck, prune, scallion, pepper

mousse of : sole or flounder lobster tomolley (sp?) white pepper.

good luck.

does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

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Thanks for all the great suggestions.... Keep them coming!
Lamb sausage. Use North African spices, maybe cumin, coriander, caraway add some pine nuts and fruit (prunes or dates). Lots of garlic of course, maybe some herbs such as thyme or cilantro.

Already doing a Merguez, Lamb, harissa, paprika, garlic, cumin & corriander (cilantro)

Lamb, Pinenuts, Dates, cumin, corriander..... sounding good!

Sumac is great in Merguez. Adds a lemony tartness.

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