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Setting up a stage in France


oscubic
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I'm hoping someone who has staged here in France can answer some of the hanging questions in this thread: 

For Americans or Non-EU citizens, are you required to get a work permit for an unpaid stage?  Insurance?  What is the norm? 

Can someone who came from another country chime in on the level of French required?  I am assuming the more the better but if anyone has first hand experiences from stages... 

Also does anyone have a suggestion for Chef_on_the_go for the search for a restaurant to approach in either Avignon or Marseille?

You are not required to get a work visa to stage in France - paid/unpaid is irrelevant. You are however required by the French government to get a stage visa - legally/officially. The French government does not require insurance - but the work establishment may.

Language requirements vary - depending on the kitchen, section, day - you may have a co-worker who speaks your language on given days. Of course speaking the native language of the kitchen helps - working and bullshitting - but having said that, I've communicated better with some chefs in some kitchens with whom I've shared no common verbal language.

As far as where to stage in Avignon or Marseille, that's a pretty broad question.

There is not a norm - despite what everyone else might tell you. Prospective stagiaires, contact your desired work establishments for their requirements.

http://www.consulfrance-washington.org/art...?id_article=400

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  • 3 weeks later...

Bonjour,

My name is Steven and I am going to be travelling to Nice/ montpellier for work this summer. I am going to stage at some restaurants but i need some opinions on some of my choices. I will not be guaranteed anything but it never hurts to ask for opinions. I would like to work in the fine dining restaurants not necessarily even michlen star restaurants. My main concern is just learning the french culture while travelling, refining my french skills and meet new people.

Here are some of my choices:

Le Jardin des Sens- Montpellier

La Bastide Saint-Antoine

Hotel Negresco-Nice

Parcours Live restaurant-Nice

Le petit Nice-Passedat-Marseille

La Merenda

La Reserve-Beaulieu

And this is im not too sure about but ive heard people talking about it the restauratn is called 'Jouni' ?

If you guys have any experience working in Nice or Montpellier, some advice for a fellow industry person would be greatly appreciated. I'm not too sure where I end up and all I know is that by June i will be out of Canada and in France. Thanks! :raz:

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Bonjour,

My name is Steven and I am going to be travelling to Nice/ montpellier for work this summer. I am going to stage at some restaurants but i need some opinions on some of my choices. I will not be guaranteed anything but it never hurts to ask for opinions. I would like to work in the fine dining restaurants not necessarily even michlen star restaurants. My main concern  is just learning the french culture while travelling, refining my french skills and meet new people.

Here are some of my choices:

Le Jardin des Sens- Montpellier

La Bastide Saint-Antoine

Hotel Negresco-Nice

Parcours Live restaurant-Nice

Le petit Nice-Passedat-Marseille

La Merenda

La Reserve-Beaulieu

And this is im not too sure about but ive heard people talking about it the restauratn is called 'Jouni' ?

If you guys have any experience working in Nice or Montpellier, some advice for a fellow industry person would be greatly appreciated. I'm not too sure where I end up and all I know is that by June i will be out of Canada and in France. Thanks! :raz:

anyone?

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It all depends on your experience. In most two and three star restaurants, with a very few notable exceptions such as Lamelloise, you will be doing prep work all day. Spend your first four to six hours boiling and shelling lobsters, and your next five or six picking chervil and tarragon. You may learn much more at the 1 star places - of which I'll let you take your pick.

In terms of sheer technique, the Hotel Negresco's restaurant, Chantecler, is absolutely world class and could easily compete on that level with just about any three star in France. The work they do is amazing, and the level of patiserie there is also beyond what even most three stars do. I don't recommend Jardin des Sens, the meal I had there operated somewhere between the 1 and 2 star levels (they've recently been downgraded to 2 stars.)

There is a tiny town in provence called Eygalières, whose 1 michelin star restaurant, Bistrot d'Eygalières, is one of the best I've been to in Provence.

Good luck!

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Hello, just wanted to continue this thread, I was just wondering if anyone has every staged or worked with Pierre Herme? I am a cook and i will be staging and cooking in France in the summer time but I have a strong interest in Pastry and chocolate work also and maybe after I stage at some restaurants I could try getting in and work for him. Or maybe any other well known pastry chefs or chocolatiers you know of, any information would really help. Thanks!

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Getting in with Herme is going to be a very difficult task. There is literally a line of people wanting to stage at his places. Last year, a couple of my friends did two month stints at Herme. I don't want to discourage, because I would love to stage there too. But they told me they didn't get to do much. And a shock to them, many of the processes were automated.

Paris has many great pasty and chocolate shops. Go to a place and see and taste the work they do. Talk with the person behind the counter. Ask to talk with the patissier. You never know what could happen. I personally think you can learn much more at a smaller shop. There are less employees which means more duties spread to less people.

Edited by sooosj (log)
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  • 10 months later...

Congratulations :smile:

I remember you were trying to set up a stage in France some time ago, is this the stage or are you returning?

I am not really sure if we have members in Avignon but I am sure that everyone here would love to hear about what it's like for an American to work in a French kitchen.

Bon courage....

www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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Congratulations :smile:

I remember you were trying to set up a stage in France some time ago, is this the stage or are you returning? 

I am not really sure if we have members in Avignon but I am sure that everyone here would love to hear about what it's like for an American to work in a French kitchen. 

Bon courage....

This will be my return to Avignon. I'm not staging this time, I've actually got a paid gig. I can't say enough how amazing of an experience it is to go to work in France, or anywhere in Europe!!! Where there is a will, there is a way!!!

Merci!

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I'm a qualified chef from Australia and will be travelling around Europe starting in June.

I am planning on travelling around France around August and looking for work but am worried that my lack of french will hinder my chances of getting a job.

I want to gain as much experience as possible and unpaid stages will not bother me so long as i am gaining valuable experience.

Is it possible to work in french kitchens without speaking the language?

Will it be possible to just knock on kitchen doors to find work?

How hard is it to gain a stage in a 2 or 3 michelin starred establishment?

Thanks in advance for any advice

Russell

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I'm a qualified chef from Australia and will be travelling around Europe starting in June.

I am planning on travelling around France around August and looking for work but am worried that my lack of french will hinder my chances of getting a job.

I want to gain as much experience as possible and unpaid stages will not bother me so long as i am gaining valuable experience.

Is it possible to work in french kitchens without speaking the language?

Will it be possible to just knock on kitchen doors to find work?

How hard is it to gain a stage in a 2 or 3 michelin starred establishment?

Thanks in advance for any advice

Russell

I assume you've already checked out our compendium on stages?

There's lots of information there that may answer some of your queries.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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  • 2 months later...

This is a bit boring. But, Im working on a business plan and I was wondering---when it comes to insurance, who covers the person doing the stagier when they get hurt? It seems if a restaurant is nice enough to take you in, then they shouldnt be held responsible to the intern who cut off their finger---or whatever.

Who is held liable for the person working for free? In America its not considered working if your not getting paid so you cant put it on a "workers comp" insurance policy.

Just a little baffled on how to cover it here in America.

Gorganzola, Provolone, Don't even get me started on this microphone.---MCA Beastie Boys

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I don't know but I'm gonna guess. I think the business pays out of it's liability insurance or out of it's butt. One, because the business always pays for every dang thing. And because if a patron of the restaurant was injured in some way the business once again would fork over. A non-paid worker bee is at least a patron. Y'know?

But I'm just totally quessing. We'll see how close I am as answers come in.

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This is a bit boring. But, Im working on a business plan and I was wondering---when it comes to insurance, who covers the person doing the stagier when they get hurt? It seems if a restaurant is nice enough to take you in, then they shouldnt be held responsible to the intern who cut off their finger---or whatever.

Who is held liable for the person working for free? In America its not considered working if your not getting paid so you cant put it on a "workers comp" insurance policy.

Just a little baffled on how to cover it here in America.

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  • 2 years later...

a follow-up on the insurance question. I will be working at the Norwegian embassy in Paris for a year, starting September. On my time of, I would like to stage at different restaurants. My question is this; If I go knocking on kitchen doors, will they be asking me about insurance? and if so, is there a local insurance I can get?

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  • 5 months later...

So, I'm well established in Paris and am now looking to get a stage for the last week of December and first of January. Is there anyone who could put in a good word for me or offer me some advice? I am looking at somewhere within walking distance of Champs Elysees, as I live of a side street from it. If it works out, then hopefully I can spend some more time at the restaurant on my nights of, as there tend to be some from time to time...

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Ok, I am officially a desperate spammer. Since I work for the embassy, its impossible to plan ahead, as diplomatic emergencies that require my peacekeeping cooking can occur on a moments notice. But now I have some time of and I have contacted most of the 2 and 3 star restaurants in Paris. As they are some of the most popular restaurants in one of the most popular cities, they take their sweet time in responding. Either that, or I'm a hopeless candidate for free labour. If any of you people have the ear of anyone who could help me at one of the following restaurants, you'd have the gratitude of the Norwegian nation. Remember that when your local oil runs out ;) Here is the spam-list:

Árpege

Le Maurice

Le Bristol

Gagnaire

La Table de Joel Robuchon

Le Cinq

Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athene

Ledoyen

Lasserre

Taillevent

Apicius

Le Grand Vefour

L’Espadon

Senderens

Le Pre Catelan

I'm going full tilt nuts waiting for a reply!

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