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Roast vegetables


Chufi
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The trick is to roast them for a long time at low temp.  They become sweet, tender and the dark crusty bits are like candy. ...

That is very interesting. I have always done them at a much higher temperature with varying results. Will certainly be anxious to try at the lower temperature to see if I can get more consistency. Thanks!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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High-temp/short-time here as well... interesting. In fact, when I'm doing just potatoes, I sometimes start them at 450 before lowering to 400.

I must try the low-temp/long-time to experience the difference.

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

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I would echo the 400 or 450 degree roasting temperature.

That would be my default, but it varies from veg. to veg.

Also, does anyone do eggplant alone? It always gets tough when I roast it by itself.

Anyone have a good technique (I seem to remember Chufi having some in her blog)?

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I'm another high temperature gal.... I guess we're all going to have to give the low temperature.... longer cooking time a try, to compare :biggrin:

sarah

Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was. --Unknown

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I used to use the high temp roasting method starting with the firmer vegetables and would add the vegetables that needed less cooking as the time progressed but sometimes some would get overdone and some would not be cooked enough and, as you note, you really need to keep them pretty much in a single layer.

I wanted to do larger batches so I consulted with a relative who did supurb roasted vegetables in advance of huge family holiday dinners and either presented them on their own or on a platter with meats or poultry. Since then, with a couple of modifications, I have used her method and people rave about the flavor and they get better with being held in the fridge for a couple of days.

As you can see, I use a large pan, it is half-sheet size and deep. I fill it almost to the top, leaving room for some stirring. I chop everything about the same size, spread a layer across the bottom, ladle on some of the oil-roasted garlic cloves and oil, sprinkle on some seasonings.

Add another layer, more garlic and oil, more seasoning and so on until everything is in the pan.

It goes into the oven at 275 and at the end of an hour I stir it well bringing the stuff from the bottom to the top and etc.

I then stir it every 30 minutes for the remaining 2 hours.

Everything is at just the right degree of doneness. The already roasted garlic has mostly broken down and become part of the seasoning/dressing.

For the garlic roasted in oil, I use a 6 quart Visions pot, 1 pound of peeled garlic cloves, 1 gallong of good olive oil - I get the stuff in the gold can with filigree design on it that can be found at any Italian grocery. It doesn't have to be "extra virgin" in fact it is better if it is not, but it does have to be very fresh.

Again, this is a long, slow roasting proposition, the entire house (and neighborhood) will have the aroma of roasting garlic but no one around my home minds it at all.

I keep the oven at 275 degrees F. until the garlic cloves are uniformly dark, reddish brown.

I allow it to cool in the cookpot then transfer to a sterilized 1 1/2 gallon jar with a wire bail, glass top with rubber gasket.

It will keep at room temperature for at least a year. The oil does not go rancid because the enzymes that can cause that have been destroyed by the long, slow heating.

I use a stainless steel ladle that has been dipped into boiling water and allowed to air dry when I remove the garlic from the oil, however the oil can be poured out if all I need is some oil.

There is no danger of botulisim that one has with cold-infused garlic oil and the flavor is far superior to any commercial garlic oil I have tried.

These things are easy to do, they just take time. The roasted garlic is always available for immediate use and it has a myriad of uses, including just mashing and spreading on toast.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Also, does anyone do eggplant alone? It always gets tough when I roast it by itself.

Anyone have a good technique (I seem to remember Chufi having some in her blog)?

I roast eggplant whole (don't forget to pierce the skin - or they could blow up in the oven, happened to me once :shock: ) and when they are completely collapsed, scrape out the flesh and use for dips or fritters.

Pieces of eggplant are difficult. When you don't use enough oil, they end up like rubber. They need a lot of oil.

Andiesenji, I think I will try your slow-roast method next time. I'm interested in the difference in flavour/texture.

Not suitable for a quick after work supper though, more of a weekend project!

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It would seem to me like the high temperature/short time preparation makes more sense if you cut your vegetables to a smaller size. A longer, slower preparation with densely packed vegetables seems like it would allow for more vegetable to vegetable steaming than dehydration, which is what I believe is in part behind the concentration of flavor in roasted vegetables, though I guess the long cooking times might make up for this. Caramelization also might be an issue if you are stacking your vegetables densely. I guess it's all a matter of preference.

And yeah, eggplant flesh definitely can have a tendency to soak up oil like a sponge, amen to that.

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This batch included carrots, parsnips, potatoes (Yukon gold), celery, onions and red, yellow and gold peppers in addition to the roasted garlic and oil.

I sometimes include any or all of the following: celeriac, kohlrabi, white sweet (actually unsweet) potatoes, rutabaga, golden beets and squash.

My favorite seasonings are a pepper medley I buy at Smart & Final that has no salt in it, chipotle pepper seasoning with herbs and kosher or sea salt, not too much as it can always be added at the end.

I take a small tasting sample at the end of two hours and again at 2 1/2 hours just to make sure things are progressing well. And, of course, at the end of the roasting time I taste again, after stirring well.

I can always put it back in the oven for a little additional time, if necessary, however I can't recall when there was need to do this. At this point they are just the way I like them.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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To those of you who have made the famous eG roasted cauliflower...

When I've made the roasted cauliflower with a high heat, I get the delicious browned bits. But I've made it a couple times at a lower temperature for a longer period of time, too. While it doesn't get the browned spots like it does with the high heat, the cauliflower ends up an overall beautiful golden color and tastes great.

andie's low/slow method sounds "sound" to me.

andiesenji, how long would you approximate the cooking time is for your oven oil-roasted garlic?

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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To those of you who have made the famous eG roasted cauliflower...

When I've made the roasted cauliflower with a high heat, I get the delicious browned bits.  But I've made it a couple times at a lower temperature for a longer period of time, too.  While it doesn't get the browned spots like it does with the high heat, the cauliflower ends up an overall beautiful golden color and tastes great.

andie's low/slow method sounds "sound" to me.

andiesenji, how long would you approximate the cooking time is for your oven oil-roasted garlic?

It can vary, depending on how fresh or how young the garlic is. Young garlic takes longer than "aged" garlic, soft neck takes longer than hard neck.

I begin checking it at an hour then check at 30 minute intervals after that.

I occasionally fish out a fat clove and smash in on some crusty bread to taste.

The tasting and testing is fun as well as useful.

For gifts, I ladle some of the cloves into a pint canning jar, then fill with the hot oil, using a funnel so no oil gets onto the rim of the jar. I then apply the lid while the oil is still hot.

After it cools, you can hear the "ping" of the lid sealing and see the dimple in the center of the lid.

This can be stored safely at room temperature for long periods, although it usually doesn't last long. People who recieve it generally return the jars for a "refill" within a few months.

The oil by itself, with a few herbs and salt, is great for dipping bread.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 9 years later...

Tonight was a failure.  I prepared roast carrots.  Carrots are something I am understandably frightened of after cutting off the tip of my thumb last fall, a year ago.

 

Anyhow, I steamed the quartered carrots for a minute along with fingerling potatoes.  Then I roasted them for an hour at 375 deg F, followed by perhaps another half an hour while waiting for the rest of dinner.

 

My grilled lamb chop was just as I like it.  The potatoes were OK.  String beans that I sautéed were also good.  Would have been very good except for the time they'd been sitting in the refrigerator.

 

With all that said and done, the carrots I was so looking forward to were carbonized.  Inedible.  As Leon Aschkenasy said to James Cagney in the movie One, Two, Three:  "Totally unsatisfactory!"

 

I blame it on the rhum.

 

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Carrots, depending on size take for me 20- 40 minutes to roast, not longer,  I add them after the potatoes been in  either 10  or 30 minutes.

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Tonight was a failure.  I prepared roast carrots.  Carrots are something I am understandably frightened of after cutting off the tip of my thumb last fall, a year ago.

 

Anyhow, I steamed the quartered carrots for a minute along with fingerling potatoes.  Then I roasted them for an hour at 375 deg F, followed by perhaps another half an hour while waiting for the rest of dinner.

 

My grilled lamb chop was just as I like it.  The potatoes were OK.  String beans that I sautéed were also good.  Would have been very good except for the time they'd been sitting in the refrigerator.

 

With all that said and done, the carrots I was so looking forward to were carbonized.  Inedible.  As Leon Aschkenasy said to James Cagney in the movie One, Two, Three:  "Totally unsatisfactory!"

 

I blame it on the rhum.

Perhaps this would help.

Scroll down for carrots.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/12/the-food-lab-how-to-roast-vegetables.html

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna, that method was similar to what I did, except for matter of the time.  Since I have more carrots left I will try again in a couple days.

Jo,

I saw that you did steam them but for just a minute which I didn't feel would give you the best results. If you do try it again let us know how it works. Roasted carrots are perhaps my favorite vegetable.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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this is one area where the Cuisi-SB is a great help.

rotuts,

I have to tell you that my attempt at roasting parsnips in the CSO proved very disappointing. I don't know if I reported on it while we were up north but so little caramelization took place that the parsnips were tasteless and soggy. Possibly it was operator error.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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rotuts,

I have to tell you that my attempt at roasting parsnips in the CSO proved very disappointing. I don't know if I reported on it while we were up north but so little caramelization took place that the parsnips were tasteless and soggy. Possibly it was operator error.

 

How did you cook them, Anna? I will go search that thread, but here is Williams-Sonoma's suggestion for cooking them in the Cuisi - steam-broil (instead of steam-bake) at 450F for about 20 mins on the upper rack position. (Though I would be keeping a pretty careful eye on them or else use a lower rack position)

 

jo, I rarely roast cut carrots for more than about 20 mins. 

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rotuts,

I have to tell you that my attempt at roasting parsnips in the CSO proved very disappointing. I don't know if I reported on it while we were up north but so little caramelization took place that the parsnips were tasteless and soggy. Possibly it was operator error.

Anna - I can attest that roasted parsnips can caramelize a bit and are delicious (drizzle with olive oil and honey as needed. Wait, is that cheating?). Don't give up on them yet!

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Anna - I can attest that roasted parsnips can caramelize a bit and are delicious (drizzle with olive oil and honey as needed. Wait, is that cheating?). Don't give up on them yet!

I love them and make them frequently. They simply did not work in the steam oven.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Ah ok, thanks for the clarification. Not sure why you would use steam if caramelization is the goal... but I don't have a steam oven so I should probably keep my mouth shut! :smile: In any case, a regular oven is fine for this.

Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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How did you cook them, Anna? I will go search that thread, but here is Williams-Sonoma's suggestion for cooking them in the Cuisi - steam-broil (instead of steam-bake) at 450F for about 20 mins on the upper rack position. (Though I would be keeping a pretty careful eye on them or else use a lower rack position)

jo, I rarely roast cut carrots for more than about 20 mins.

I posted a photo of them on October 15. I did not comment but just from looking at the photograph I recall how limp and soggy they were yet over charred in places. I believe I followed something very similar to that found on the Williams Sonoma site.

Edited for sense.

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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My favorite way to do this is to roast a combination (must have beets, eggplant, onion, carrots at least).

Then warm up a nice fluffy pita like the kind you get stacked in a bag at Costco.

Then put a generous amount into the pita, top with goat cheese, and fold in half.

 

Wow, is that good.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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