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Roast vegetables


Chufi
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I know many have sung the praises of roast cauliflower here on EGullet. But tonight as I was preparing dinner I was reminded that roasting in a hot oven, with some oil, salt and maybe some herbs, is one of the very best ways to prepare any vegetable. The heat intensifies the flavor, you get all those lovely crispy bits.. mmm. Tonight I roasted a combo of carrots, potatoes and shallots, tossed with thyme and rosemary and olive oil:

before

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and after roasting:

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Some of my favorites:

green beans

pumpkin and butternut squash

parsnip, celeriac, and jerusalem artichoke.

Sometimes I serve them hot but I also love roast vegetables at room temp, as part of a salad.

What are your favorite vegetables for roasting and how do you use them?

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Oh yeah, this is my favourite winter food. And it's so simple to prepare and so satisfying.

I usually do a mix of new potatoes, sweet potatoes, cauliflower, broccoli, carrots, leeks, beets and mushrooms (of course this mix varies depending on availability and what else looks good), with just salt & pepper & balsamic for seasoning. I'll cook the root vegetables covered for a little while to give them a head-start, then add the rest of the veggies and roast them.

This with a pan-fried or baked halibut filet, and some roasted spaghetti squash. Mmmmmm.

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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Once for kicks I did all white roasted vegetables - Cauliflower, Parsnip, Potato, Cel Root. This actually worked and was quite fun. I don't think I need to invoke the mammoth roasted cauliflower thread on here that got me started on the whole thing.

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What are your favorite vegetables for roasting and how do you use them?

Roasted Carrot and Coriander (seed) soup. Nice crisp flavors, but still a definite winter soup.

"It is just as absurd to exact excellent cooking from a chef whom one provides with defective or scanty goods, as to hope to obtain wine from a bottled decoction of logwood." -Escoffier
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I love roasted Brussel sprouts!

Over this past weekend, I introduced my GF to those... with some zucchini and yellow squash to boot. I usually use olive oil and lemon juice as my flavorings, though.

Ditto with roasted asparagus.

Come to think of it, those were all broiled instead. Oh well, still browned and lovely!

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I love roasted Brussel sprouts!

My wife taught me how to make these by mixing them in mustard, salt, pepper and a little canola oil before roasting. The "roasted mustard" aroma goes so well with brussel sprouts! Amazing..

"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler
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zeitoun that sounds fabulous. I'm going to have to try that one. What kind of mustard?

We use regular Dijon mustard. I particularly like the french "Maille" brand but I am sure you can use whatever else pleases you. Really good stuff...

"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler
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Last week, a local store had asparagus on sale so... roasted asparagus, brussel sprouts and cherry tomatoes :rolleyes: . The asparagus and tomatoes fought over which was the sweeter.

It was so good, I went back to the store next day, and we had it all a second time!!!

Burgundy makes you think silly things, Bordeaux makes you talk about them, and Champagne makes you do them ---

Brillat-Savarin

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We use regular Dijon mustard.  I particularly like the french "Maille" brand but I am sure you can use whatever else pleases you.  Really good stuff...

Thanks zeitoun. That would have been my first choice too. Although I'm tempted to try it with the grained mustard.

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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These photos were in a post I put in the "You know you are a foodie when........" thread.

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I make them in big batches as they make a great base for "instant" stew, all alone as a hot or cold side dish and pureed a little or a lot to make a soup.

Even though this has no meat in it, it has a "meaty" flavor.

Carrots, parsnips, potatoes, celery, onions, sweet peppers, garlic and seasonings.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I adore roast vegetables, especially cubes of butternut squash with some cumin and coriander.

I often do a big plate of roast veg. butternut sqush or carrots, green beans, parsnips, tomatoes, shallots, whatever is on hand. Even artichoke hearts are good, eggplant, zucchini.

Asparagus is wonderful done with oil, salt and garlic.

Roast tomato halves with thyme.

Cauliflower, new potatoes, brussel sprouts.

Roasted (and peeled) red peppers of course, though somewhat different.

Sweet potato wedges, I even roasted baby bok choy once.

I could go on and on...

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gallery_9366_412_1101671252.jpg

This is dish of roasted vegetables I made for dinner party: Carrots, parsnips, baby turnips, and two types of beets tossed with olive oil and a bit of fresh thyme. I actually roasted the beets seperately to prevent the color from running on the other vegetables and added them to the dish later.

In the summer I really like roasting cherry tomatoes with olive oil, lots of chopped garlic, thyme and oregano.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I like roasting eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes, bell peppers, onions and garlic for a roasted ratatouille type dish.

Also love roasted root veggies.... especially parsnips.... yum :wub:

It seems to me that there is something about roasting that brings out such sweet qualities in certain vegetables.... it's like vegetable nirvana.

sarah

Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was. --Unknown

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No one has mentioned roast kale!

Rinse, stem and rib the leaves, tear them into bite-size pieces, toss in a big bowl with olive oil and salt, place on a baking sheet and roast in a 400ºF oven for no more than 10 minutes, stirring once or twice during the cooking. It's like Chinese deep-fried spinach, only tastier and healthier. What's more, eveyone loves it, even veggie-adverse kids.

Wish I could claim the idea was mine but I got it from here, a recipe adapted from Epicurious. Whatever. The referred-to salad has become a wintertime favourite chez nous.

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I am the weird one out here. I've only had roast vegetables in restaurants or at catered affairs like company picnics (caterers seem to love roast vegetables for some reason), and they have always tasted like shoe leather to me. The texture seems horrible to me, all tough and stringy and dried out. Except for roast potatoes, which are invariably hard and undercooked.

Sorry. Maybe I should try it at home or something.

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The trick is to roast them for a long time at low temp. They become sweet, tender and the dark crusty bits are like candy.

They do need to be dressed with oil before they go in the oven. Oil in which you have roasted garlic cloves also for a long time at low temp.

The batch pictured above was roasted at 275 degrees F for 3 hours.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I am the weird one out here. I've only had roast vegetables in restaurants or at catered affairs like company picnics (caterers seem to love roast vegetables for some reason),  and they have always tasted like shoe leather to me.  The texture seems horrible to me, all tough and stringy and dried out.  Except for roast potatoes, which are invariably hard and undercooked.

Sorry. Maybe I should try it at home or something.

This is why I'm always wary of ordering them in restaurants. I've had the dry stringy vegetables too. Trust us, it's worth giving it a try at home sometime.

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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My favorite combination is brussel sprouts, cauliflower and red onion cut into wedges. I love the roasted red onion!

But I often just throw in whatever I have...sometimes eggplant, carrots, broccoli, red pepper.

Did I mention that I love the red onion!?!

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The trick is to roast them for a long time at low temp.  They become sweet, tender and the dark crusty bits are like candy. 

They do need to be dressed with oil before they go in the oven.  Oil in which you have roasted garlic cloves also for a long time at low temp.

The batch pictured above was roasted at 275 degrees F for 3 hours.

Now that's interesting. I always roast for a short time, at high heat. The batch I showed in the first post was roasted for 30 minutes at 220 C (about 430 F). I toss everything in oil and make sure there's only a single layer of vegetables on the sheet.

Any other thoughts on roasting at low heat for a long time versus high heat for a short time?

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