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'Out of Style' Foods you love


NulloModo
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Mmmmm..... fondue (which is back in style!), croquettes (which I'd entirely forgotten about too!), rumaki (anyone for bacon-wrapped prunes, while we're at it?).....

And when was the last time a restaurant brought out a basket of popovers, which was one of the first things I remember learning to make in home-ec class?

A favorite of my husband's that you never see on menus anymore is Lobster Thermidor.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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I forgot to mention any of the out of style foods I love.

Croquettes come to mind.  I love them, whatever they are made of.

I had forgotten until this post jogged my memory, but as a young child, I loved chicken croquettes. I believe I haven't had one since the 1970s!

I like them all. We have a local restaurant that makes salmon croquettes occasionally, complete with the obligatory cream sauce (gravy).

I still make ham croquettes, chicken or turkey croquettes and crab croquettes.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Tuna casserole.

Thank goodness I'm not alone in my love of tuna casserole. That and chicken or turkey tetrazzini are good ole' comfort foods in my books.

Edited because I had a lapse in singular versus plural adjectival forms.

Edited by Mooshmouse (log)

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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I've always liked Chicken Tetrazzini. I didn't realize it was out of style. It's a good way to use leftover white meat, which is primarily why my mother used to make it.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Tuna casserole.

I'm not positive it was ever _in_ style, but I love it as well. When I was growing up it was always a special treat, because my father couldn't stand it. Apparently he had a roomate in college who only cooked tuna casserole, so two times a week, when that guy was on dinner rotation, that is what they ate, and he got burnt out.

My grandmom always made a great one to my tastes though, canned peas, cream of mushroom soup, and crackled lays chips on top and all.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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And when was the last time a restaurant brought out a basket of popovers, which was one of the first things I remember learning to make in home-ec class?

At my night job, we had a popover on our menu last year. It was flavoured with horseradish, and we filled the hollow with wild rice. It was the starch that went with our caribou tenderloin.

My boss likes to dip into the old warhorses from time to time, giving them a bit of a twist. We have a take on Coquilles St Jacques on our current appetizer menu, and a version of Crepes Suzette on the dessert menu.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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At my night job, we had a popover on our menu last year.  It was flavoured with horseradish, and we filled the hollow with wild rice.  It was the starch that went with our caribou tenderloin.

My boss likes to dip into the old warhorses from time to time, giving them a bit of a twist.  We have a take on Coquilles St Jacques on our current appetizer menu, and a version of Crepes Suzette on the dessert menu.

Sounds like a restaurant I need to try! Where are you?

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Home with the kids today, the topic of food came up, and I was recounting the days when every baby shower had crepes. Back when the Magic Pan was on Nicollet Mall. I think we'll make crepes this weekend. Sweet and savory. Anybody else remember the Magic Pan?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Veal scallopini marsala!

To my recolection it is one or the other, both good dishes but not both. Marsala bing mushrooms in brown wing gravy, Scallopini in a white garlic.

Living hard will take its toll...
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Anybody else remember the Magic Pan?

I do, I do! Besides their crepes (nothing like real French crepes, but I liked them), I loved their side-salad of spinach with a mandarin-orange dressing (which I still haven't been able to duplicate).

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Five-cup salad. Marshmallows and crushed pineapple, and the other three cups could be anything--coconut, sour cream, Koolwhip, Mandarin sections, Fruit Cocktail, Jello, mayo, and one we just spotted in a local cafeteria: grated sharp cheese. It was yummy. And they called it Mississippi salad---I'm FROM there, and never had that one.

And SHARP Pimiento Cheese with lots of bitter pimiento, including the juice out of the jar. Black pepper and a little mayo...memories of teenage Coke parties, with the little crocheted panties on the bottles.

And sometimes those parties had complicated little sandwiches: checkerboard, stripes, pinwheels, all made with the same three fillings: pimiento cheese, tuna salad, egg salad. And a loaf sandwich constructed to look like a cake: A loaf of unsliced bread (hard to get---you had to go to Wonder Bread and drive up at their employees' entrance and get someone coming out to go in and get one for you). You took it home, sliced off all the crust all way around with your electric knife, sliced it longwise into five slices, and spread each one with a filling, alternating for color contrast. You stacked it, then frosted the whole thing with softened cream cheese (with a drop of McCormick food color if you were fancy) onto which you piped or attached some sort of flowers, maybe cut out of thin carrot slices with green onion blade stems.

And I just saw one of those dip-the-bottom crepe pans in Goodwill not long ago. It had little crusties all up the sides...guess they threw it out in disgust after one try. It DID look as if it had spent a long time in solitary, maybe in a dark cabinet.

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Veal scallopini marsala!

To my recolection it is one or the other, both good dishes but not both. Marsala bing mushrooms in brown wing gravy, Scallopini in a white garlic.

...perhaps greenwich is thinking of scallopine the cut of veal....and when I think Marsala sauce, I just know there's Marsala wine in...I don't tend to eat it because I don't enjoy the Marsala sauce.

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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I hate that there are so many fashion and food police theses days to tell everyone what's hot and what's not..I'm always aghast at what some of these guys are wearing/eating themselves....

That said....Let's hear it for veal or chicken cordon bleu. As soon as the Atkins people put out the word... it will have a new run.

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Yeah, I love anything butterscotch (good butterscotch, of course, not that sickening artificial stuff). I'm trying to remember what I used to have in butter rum flavor when I was a kid -- some candy. It had a minute but tasteable amount of rum in every candy. Bad food for a Muslim, but very pleasant for a non-Muslim American kid. I must have had those things when I was like 7 years old. Never got a buzz on them, didn't care, but they tasted good.

Edited by Pan (log)

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I'm trying to remember what I used to have in butter rum flavor when I was a kid -- some candy.

Life Savers!

Hey, I was going to say that! You beat me to it, Joie :laugh: I'm going to get a roll of them later this afternoon, I forgot what they taste like :wink:

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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I'm trying to remember what I used to have in butter rum flavor when I was a kid -- some candy.

Life Savers!

Thats what I thought of right away...Life Savers....Rum Butter... or ...Butter Rum....or Butter Scotch...I think they were made from the same batch and then some crazy Scottish Guy sprinkled some of Ireland's...oooppsss... I mean Scotlands's best (probably a fine douse of the Speyside) on the sweet little drops.

Naw...

It it must be the chemicals that make me crave it fort-nightly....

Never-mind...

John

It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.

Hunter S. Thompson ---- R.I.P. 1939 - 2005

"Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society."

--Mark Twain

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