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Food Mills


msphoebe
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Count me as a vote for the CuisiPro, with the caveat that, in all honesty, I just don't use it as much as I thought I would. A food processor or blender and a strainer are more effective for most of the things I thought I would use it for, so it really just ends up taking up space in my cabinets. I would suggest evaluating what you want to use it for carefully before spending the money. I love gadgetry, but I didn't really need this one, in the end.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I have the Good Grips food mill, and like it just fine. Then again, I don't have anything to compare it to!

I use it mostly for mashed potatoes, because I like mine smooth and was never happy with the hand-held masher. I figured a food mill would be more versatile than a potato ricer. I've also used it for applesauce and such.

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Count me as a vote for the CuisiPro, with the caveat that, in all honesty, I just don't use it as much as I thought I would. A food processor or blender and a strainer are more effective for most of the things I thought I would use it for, so it really just ends up taking up space in my cabinets.

I like it for certain thick purees because it's easier to get them through the food mill than through a strainer. It's also good for anything that you don't want to beat up with a machine (potatoes, etc.). But I don't use it as much as I'd hoped. If it hadn't been for a W.S. gift certificate, I probably wouldn't have gotten it.

It's a cuisipro, and it's excellent.

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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Count me as a vote for the CuisiPro, with the caveat that, in all honesty, I just don't use it as much as I thought I would. A food processor or blender and a strainer are more effective for most of the things I thought I would use it for, so it really just ends up taking up space in my cabinets.

I like it for certain thick purees because it's easier to get them through the food mill than through a strainer. It's also good for anything that you don't want to beat up with a machine (potatoes, etc.). But I don't use it as much as I'd hoped. If it hadn't been for a W.S. gift certificate, I probably wouldn't have gotten it.

It's a cuisipro, and it's excellent.

I don't mean to say I don't use it at all, just rarely. I prefer a ricer for mashed potatoes since I'm generally only cooking for two. I find it slow and inefficient for making tomato puree compared to a food processor and strainer. And those were the two things I bought it for! So for me, the $50 probably would have been better spent elsewhere. If the OP has stuff that require it, great. I just caution against assuming it's going to be this wonderfully useful gadget, when for me, at least, it hasn't worked out that way.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I use my food mill every time I make tomato sauce for pasta. The coarse die gives me just the texture I want, and on the rare occasions I want to include some sauteed vegetables (onion, carrot and celery usually) I can just cook everything together in big chunks until it's tender and then pass it through the food mill to get the texture I want.

--

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I bought the Cuisipro stainless steel food mill on a Cook's Illustrated recommendation, and I have nothing but praise for this gadget. I make a lot of Joel Robucheon's potato puree (based on the Patricia Wells recipe) and this baby churns out such a seductively velvety puree, it made me shelve my drum mesh as it is no longer needed to ensure proper texture. I also thrown this baby into the dishwasher many many times and it turns as smoothly as it does the day I bought it. I bought this thing for about $50 on a cross-border trip down to Seattle, and I think it'll last me until the day I pass it down to my grandchildren. Definitely one of the better gadget investments I've made over the years.

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  • 8 months later...

Mine says "macina-legumi" on the handle, which I think means "vegetable machine" -- not exactly a brand. But it is exactly the same as ElsieD describes. In addition to the removable discs, the other thing to look for in a food mill are the three retractable "bars" that can rest on a bowl, so that you can use your two hands for (1) holding the handle firmly and (2) turning the mill. I've seen food mills without them, but I would find it difficult to keep the mill steady over the bowl.


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There's a good topic on this that I read before buying a Rosle Food Mill: Raspberry Puree.

Kerry Beal recommended it and that's good enough for me! :biggrin:

P.S. It's a Christmas gift so I haven't use it as yet.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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It seems that this is a commonly asked question in eG; try this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...0entry1537650

In French, the food mill is called Mouli Legume so you may find it under this name when searching.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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  • 3 months later...

Surprised when a search didn't turn up anything on food mills (at least going back several pages of results). Reviews at Amazon are all over the place. A little help choosing, please?

I have a plastic RSVP mill at home that I like, but it's too small and probably too flimsy for the kitchen at my firehouse - where I'm in charge of stocking the pantry and kitchen. Can someone recommend a mill that:

- Will sit properly over a 12 qt stockpot (about 11" diameter)

- Is sturdily built to resist rough use by eager but inexperienced, ham-fisted kitchen helpers?

- Comes with a disk fine enough to seed tomatoes

- Is easy to take apart and clean - and hopefully dishwasher safe?

- Value priced?

Thanks!!

---------------

Matt T

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I use a Cuisipro. It has a 4 qt. capacity and has three disks - fine, medium and coarse. It is stainless steel. I'm not sure it will fit on your stock pot though. I just measured my Dutch oven and it is 10" across and the food mill fits nicely on that but I'm not sure if it will span 11". If it fits your pot, I'm sure it will work nicely for you.

I think they sell for between $40 - $50 in the States.

Edited by ElsieD (log)
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I have this one. I bought it because there was a great offer - $30 - and I didn't know what to do with it at the time. I now use it all the time and I couldn't make Gazpacho without it.

I haven't put it in the dish washer. Cleaning the stuck tomato seeds takes some time... but I find the disks are good for the task. I sometimes go with the medium disk first and then with the fine one.

It's probably too small for an 11'' pot.

Edited by genarog (log)
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I have ones similar to those mentioned above, it works great, but it won't sit on a pot of 11in diameter, you would have to always hold it. Maybe something like this might work for you.

Mike

The Dairy Show

Special Edition 3-In The Kitchen at Momofuku Milk Bar

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Cuisipro won Cook's Illustrated's test but lots of people on Amazon don't like it, either. You're not the only one who's had problems. And I don't see it for under about $90.

The JB Prince item looks like what we need, but price is a little high.

Anybody have the stainless version of the RSVP, the Endurance?

---------------

Matt T

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Cuisipro won Cook's Illustrated's test but lots of people on Amazon don't like it, either.  You're not the only one who's had problems.  And I don't see it for under about $90.

The JB Prince item looks like what we need, but price is a little high.

Anybody have the stainless version of the RSVP, the Endurance?

Thanks for pointing me in the direction of the Amazon reviews, it appears that mine followed the pattern...the knob fell off. And in the case of mine the thread was broken so I couldn't put it back on. Grrrrr.

I was wrong:blush:, it's not the JB prince one I've ordered, mine is more like the one in genarog's post and about the same price which is really good for the UK.

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I have a Rosle food mill and could not be happier with it. I bought it on sale as they introduced a new model. It comes with two sieve discs but there are 5 total sizes you can purchase. I mostly use it for fruit purees, mashed potatoes, and some thicker textured soups.

Cheers

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You get what you pay for, I guess. Althought the little plastic RSVP works pretty well in home use, with judicious application of force.

How small holes would be required to reliably seed tomatoes? In my shopping I've seen mills with minimum hole sizes in the finest included disk of 2.5, 2, and 1.5mm.

---------------

Matt T

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  • 1 year later...

I was looking to spend about $50 USD, but I also want one that is reliable and I don't need to fuss over. The OXO Good Grips Food Mill was well reviewed on Amazon -- it comes with three disks -- but I would like to ask what you folks think.

I'm curious what egulleters think of the Oxo food mill too.

I've seen the same Amazon ratings, but I figure that the culinary knowledge of egullets gives them a better perspective to judge a food mill rather than the random assortment of reviewers on Amazon.

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  • 8 months later...
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