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New Gordon Ramsey series on BBC America


tan319
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First off, thank you for finding this!

After I put the topic in, I went to their website to try to find out about it but couldn't find anything.

So much for my navigational skills :sad:

So this is great!

The much talked about Boiling Point show that has been much written about and lauded.

Can't wait to see it.

Thanks again.

P.S.: The ad on the channel makes itt sound like a new series.

2317/5000

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exactly what chanel is bbc america is it available to us in the states? In nyc specifically. I mean its called bbc AMERICA and i cant find it anywhere.

I guess it depends on the cable (or dish) company you have, with time warner cable it is channel 106.

"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler
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exactly what chanel is bbc america is it available to us in the states? In nyc specifically. I mean its called bbc AMERICA and i cant find it anywhere.

I guess it depends on the cable (or dish) company you have, with time warner cable it is channel 106.

You'll only get BBC America in NYC if you have digital cable.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I'm fortunate to have DirecTV, which carries BBCA.

What a show! After watching Boiling Point, I think Gordon Ramsey was actually sedated before he filmed Kitchen Nightmares.

I found both episodes aired tonight absolutely riveting. And hilarious. The guy has chutzpah to spare. That thing with the apples killed me. However: the personal abuse he heaps on his staff (i.e., "fatty," "Spic" and the like) I found a little hard to take.

The food for the most part looked beautiful. I thought the little complimentary macaroons (in four different colors/flavors) he offered were a beautiful touch... but did I hear the Guardian critic's companion (a caterer) describe them as looking like "little turds?"

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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I have so much respect for him although I don't think I'd just stand there and go "yes Gordon", I mean it's like "what the bloody hell, a blue plaster, in this type of restaurant, what you couldn't stop by the [something] and get a f**king white plaster (btw it's a bandaid for us Americans).

He was brutal - I mean most people would have told him to F off in no incertain terms. I can't wait for Hells Kitchen on Fox talk about pressure. Bobby Flake could only wish he was as good as Gordon.

I will admit that Gordon was a bit over the top for the type of mistakes that were made maybe it's a British thing (don't know never been there I could be wrong) - I mean he was really brutal. There was a time when he was blasting this guy because the guy didn't check the air conditioning and he was like "what you couldn't stop eating your cheese balls to f**king check the [something British for air conditoning]".

On one hand it was hilarious but on the other I could feel for those other cooks. I've worked for some Europeing chefs who were pretty brutal - didn't tell me to F off but where hot when I didn't tourney the potatoes just right.

I'd like to purchase the videos and the series before this from him on BBC. Anyone know how to do this?

Jason

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I watched last night and was absolutely in stitches, as my roomates looked on in horror. It brought back memories of the constant dedication to perfection that is necessary. I do think that he was a little bit brutal, especially on his first night opening, but who wouldn't be if they had absolute controll over their 1.2 million pound (about 2 milion bucks currently) investment? I know that I would be on everyone like a hawk. As for later on down the road, his cook should know how to make a sauce, and it isn't acceptable for him not to know the process of heating after two months of making it again. He kepts saying to the cook, "Are you trying to change the repetoire again?", leading me to believe that he had run-ins with this particular line cook before with him trying to change the processes.

I do know that what Sarge (sp?), a junior sous chef, was right when he said that you feel a dedication, kind of like being in the army, where you know it is going to be difficult, you know that your going to get hollored at if you mess up, and you know that you will be accountable, whether good or bad. Remember, when Ramsey left Aubergine, he brought most of his staff with him, meaning that they WANTED to work for HIM!! 138 degrees in the kitchen is hot though, and I am sure that those boys were absolutely knackered (always looking for a good excuse to bring out my British slang) by the end of that night. That red-haired guy looked like toast, didnt' see him getting a bollocking (again, slang) though, means that he covered his ass by getting his stuff straight.

Tonyy13

Owner, Big Wheel Provisions

tony_adams@mac.com

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Upon reflection, I was disappointed that the show didn't cover how on earth he got his brand new enterprise up and running in just four weeks. All they really showed him doing was approving some decorations. Did he develop new dishes? Surely he had to train some staff?

Also, this new reality show thing he's doing depresses me. In Boiling Point, Ramsey makes a point of saying all the time that he's not a celebrity chef, he's a cook, he likes it in the kitchen, etc...

Seems like that's no longer the case.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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I thought it was riveting, and damn exciting t.v. Gordon

demonstrates what it takes to get two Michelin stars and

what he is trying to do to get a third. Arguably his is real

to a fault; demanding but so very aware of what it takes to

run a class establishment. From the color of the bandaid a

server uses and the manner in which they deport themselves to

striving for excellence in the kitchen from all levels of employees.

All in all what a fuckin great show.

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I'll continue to watch Boiling Point, though I thought it not quite as riveting as two later programs, "Kitchen Nightmares" and "Hell's Kitchen" (the latter as broadcast by ITV last spring, not the forthcoming US version). In "Kitchen Nightmares" you actually learned something. In "Hell's Kitchen" you could enjoy the wonderful upbraiding second tier celebrities suffered under GR's lashing tongue; I especially loved his run-ins with Edwinna Currie, former Tory MP and TV commentator. Watching Gordon take off at kitchen underlings on Boiling Point just doesn't have the same panache. Angus Deayton, the presenter, is the best part of "Hell's Kitchen" with a tongue sharper, though less profane, than Gordon's.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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I loved it. The only thing that got to me was Jack Davenport as the narrator (Steve from Coupling).

I was expecting him to go off on a tiraid about breasts or something. (Other Coupling fans out there will understand.)

I've recommended this show to some business students I mentor. It will be a great 'shock' to their system. ;->

"Instead of orange juice, I'm going to use the juice from the inside of the orange."- The Brilliant Sandra Lee

http://www.matthewnehrlingmba.com

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Upon reflection, I was disappointed that the show didn't cover how on earth he got his brand new enterprise up and running in just four weeks.  All they really showed him doing was approving some decorations.  Did he develop new dishes?  Surely he had to train some staff?

Also, this new reality show thing he's doing depresses me.  In Boiling Point, Ramsey makes a point of saying all the time that he's not a celebrity chef, he's a cook, he likes it in the kitchen, etc...

Seems like that's no longer the case.

Remember this was filmed in 1998, when he was 32, he was on the cusp of celebrity chef then

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I loved it.  The only thing that got to me was Jack Davenport as the narrator (Steve from Coupling).

I was expecting him to go off on a tiraid about breasts or something.  (Other Coupling fans out there will understand.)

:laugh::laugh:

Now I definitely have to re-up my DTV.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I loved it!

It thought I had worked for some obnoxious chefs, but I sure wouldn't want to work for a prick like Gordon, especially with the vent fans broken. I was surprised he didn't throw anything at anyone.

I thought it ironic that he whined about the critic referring to him as a failed footballer because it was a personal insult, then called his staff demeaning names that had to do with weight, ethnicity, etc.

"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

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I thought it ironic that he whined about the critic referring to him as a failed footballer because it was a personal insult, then called his staff demeaning names that had to do with weight, ethnicity, etc.

The difference is the critic made those statements in a public forum i.e. the newspaper where as Ramsay's statements generally don't leave the kitchen. Those statements by Ramsay wouldn't have left the kitchen if it hadn't been for the film crew. I would much rather take the abuse to my face in private than have it printed for the world to see.

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if you're calling someone a "spic" (and i'm assuming that's a racial slur in britain as it is in america), then it doesn't matter much if it's in public or private.

i couldn't patronize the establishment of someone like that.

cheers :)

hc

Did Ramsey really say that? I didn't catch it when I first saw the show. Then again, that was in 1998.

I was distantly aware of the term growing up, but only from some American movies. Which is not to say that it is not used in England, just that I don't recall hearing it being used.

Edited by VeryApe77 (log)
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Being hispanic myself - I never really looked into the word "spic" but it appears to be the same all over the place

From -> http://www.everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=58071

Spic

Though the origins of slang words can hardly ever be correctly pinpointed, it is possible that the word "spic", as an insult for those of Hispanic ethnicity, originated as either:

An amalgamation of the word "Hispanic" or

The pronounciation of the word "speak" with a Spanish accent, where the vowels sound different. The ea sound in "speak" falls closest to the Spanish vowel i, which follows only the short pronunciation of such letter in English (as in the word "spic"). The word "speak", being used often in such simple sentences as "I don't speak English", may have been mispronounced enough times by Spanish speakers as to be converted into the derogatory word "spic" by English speakers.

Edited by BonfireCuisine (log)
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Upon reflection, I was disappointed that the show didn't cover how on earth he got his brand new enterprise up and running in just four weeks.  All they really showed him doing was approving some decorations.  Did he develop new dishes?  Surely he had to train some staff?

Also, this new reality show thing he's doing depresses me.  In Boiling Point, Ramsey makes a point of saying all the time that he's not a celebrity chef, he's a cook, he likes it in the kitchen, etc...

Seems like that's no longer the case.

Remember this was filmed in 1998, when he was 32, he was on the cusp of celebrity chef then

Yeah, I know. That's my point. His years of fame have made him drop the pretense of being "just a cook," and that's kind of sad. I find the abusive personality much more understandable from a man who is working sixteen-hour days opening a restaurant on which he's staked a fortune and his Michelin stars. As a reality show schtick that personality is not something I care about watching, and it's no longer really about the food.

About "spic," did anyone else hear it? I believe it was when Ramsey was upset about a thumbprint on a plate. He said "Hey, you, spic..." or at least I thought he did. Maybe it was just that man's affectionate nickname. I could have heard it wrong.

Now that I know that the narrator is that guy from Coupling I'll be distracted for the rest of the series!

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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