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Cooking with "All About Braising" by Molly Stevens (Part 1)


Marlene
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Where oh where is your favorite butcher, and can he identify the source of the pepper bacon? :bouncing up & down excited icon: 

The Tenor is from Oregon and raves about the pepper bacon he could get up there, but the butcher he used to buy it from stopped carrying it lo these many years ago.  We used to get a decent substitute from Costco, but no more.

This one I know! I have a lovely bag of peppered bacon ends in my freezer as well (thanks to Julia, who presented me with a map of all the local food purveyors when we moved here two months ago). Got them at over Gartners Meats in Portland. The sausage there is delicious, and it looks like they do mail order as well.

Edited by tejon (log)

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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  • 2 weeks later...

I bought this book back in the spring and never got around to making anything from it - even after reading the introduction and seeing this thread. I pulled it out last night when I realized I wanted to do something different with a pork roast. I ended up making the Pork Braised in Milk. It was so quick and easy, and is a keeper.

I did have to hurry up at the end with creating the custard-like sauce though. I thought I had more time to cook the pork so we dished up our soup and then I took the pork's temperature and realized it was done! I didn't cook the sauce as long as instructed since I didn't want the soup to get cold. When my husband went back for seconds though the sauce had curdled even more to the custard consistency. It was just as good today for lunch.

As it starts to get cooler I'm looking forward to finally cooking some more recipes from the book. I just re-read all 17 pages of this thread and am going to start with some of the favorites here.

I like cows, too. I hold buns against them. -- Bucky Cat.

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Made the Zinfandel Pot Roast with glazed carrots this weekend, and MAN was that good. The sauce gets so flavorful with the wine and aromatics, I could have happily drunk a glass. Also, it's the first time I've successfully glazed anything.

As always, adjusted the recommended temps downward.

Cooking and writing and writing about cooking at the SIMMER blog

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I have yet to find too many recipes in this book that I don't like. The Zinfindel pot roast is one of my favourites.

I have not yet done the Pork braised in Milk yet, although from the raves on this thread I should. For some reason, braising in milk just doesn't connect in my mind.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I have yet to find too many recipes in this book that I don't like.  The Zinfindel pot roast is one of my favourites.

I have not yet done the Pork braised in Milk yet, although from the raves on this thread I should.  For some reason, braising in milk just doesn't connect in my mind.

It's funny because I read the title of the recipe and thought that sounds good, but then as I read through the recipe and got to the part about the milking curdling, I almost decided not to make it. I didn't even think about how the milk would curdle until I read it. But I had some whole milk to use up from another recipe so I decided what the heck. The pork was very tender and I liked the addition of the fennel. Go for it!

Edited by santo_grace (log)

I like cows, too. I hold buns against them. -- Bucky Cat.

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I've made some good stuff from this book also. The braised brussel sprouts are really good - but then I like them.

Nice to see you posting again Marlene.

thx! I wasn't home much this summer. Now it's time to bring out Molly's book again and get braising, which is my favourite way to cook in the winter. (I'm still not all that sure about this curdled milk thing though) :huh:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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thx!  I wasn't home much this summer.  Now it's time to bring out Molly's book again and get braising, which is my favourite way to cook in the winter.  (I'm  still not all that sure about this curdled milk thing though) :huh:

Do you like custard? That's how Molly describes the end product. Maybe that will help you. It's not sour tasting at all. Trust me.

I like cows, too. I hold buns against them. -- Bucky Cat.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I made the Chicken and Pork Adobo yesterday.  It was a very interesting recipe as I searched through it a number of times to see if the country pork ribs should be cut up and never did find an answer.  I cut them into large chunks and all went well.  The pork was not as tender as I had hoped but that may have been the cut of meat.  We all enjoyed it and want a repeat performance.  Since none of us are fans of rice, I served it over orzo.

I am bumping this up as it is braising weather in Seattle (at least as far as I am concerned) and I have to say that I love this recipe. I cut my pork ribs in half or thirds and as you say, it goes well. I tend to squeeze an orange or two and a grapefruit on my country style ribs and let them sit in a ziplock overnight prior to using them in almost any recipe. They are very tender after that little bath! Did you make the tomato relish to go with this dish? I thought it really made it :biggrin:

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Wanted to make the Pot Roast with Rhubarb and Honey.  Have it in frig with the rub on it.  Can't find any rhubarb.  Now what do I do??  Can I just use apples and have a decent product?  Help!

I think Marlene did it with apples, but you want a tart apple. Did you look in the freezer section at your local supermarket? I know all of the supermarkets here have it along side the frozen strawberries, raspberries, etc.

I did indeed do it with apples. I believe I used a granny smith apple and it turned out wonderfully.

Ditto for me - I used granny smith apples last year and it was really good. I am going to try it with the Rhubarb this fall.

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I left the pork in and it came out great!

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I made sandwiches with Sao Bing (Chinese sesame seed biscuits)

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LOOKS WONDERFUL!! I am definately trying this one soon. The only time I have cooked with pork belly (besides making bacon) is the Pork Belly with Ginger, Honey and Soy out of the "Rover's" book. Your pictures are making me hungry!

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Marlene: Your recipe for short ribs was absolutely delicious! I made the ribs and sauce over the weekend and refrigerated them separately. Since we have a visiting dog, I came home for lunch, combined the ribs and sauce, and popped the lot into a slow oven. Arriving home from work, we were greeted by delicious smells and fully-cooked dinner. The boys couldn’t wait to tear into the ribs, so no pictures.

The weather is now more suited to grilling than braising, so thanks for helping to end the braising season on a high note.

We just made the Braised Short Ribs in Porter Ale with Maple-Rosemary Glaze last night and they were VERY good. The prep is easy and fast and I think this is the easiest short rib recipe I have ever made. I did use chix stock rather than beef as that is all I had on hand and I think that beef or veal stock would have made the sauce just that much richer. I was patient however and really spent the time to reduce it to a syrupy consistancy and we really liked it. The glaze is a nice touch but I think it needs "something" but not sure what..........any thoughts out there? All in all - I would make again.

Cooking time/temp worked out on this one for me - I kept the oven at 275 instead of the 300. Oh - and I had a TON of liquid. I should have let the porter and chix stock boil a few minutes longer but it didn' hurt my meat! :biggrin:

My favorite short rib recipe is out of Jerry Traunfelds's "The Herbfarm Cookbook". It take much longer to make (prep-wise) but I am just addicited to it.

Next up in a few weeks is to try Marlene's short rib recipe. I didn't get to it last winter and I am excited to try it.

Marlene - if you are reading this would you consider bumping up your recipe? I know it is many pages back thread.........and I am only pleading laziness on my part to go and find it.

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Made the Zinfandel Pot Roast with glazed carrots this weekend, and MAN was that good. The sauce gets so flavorful with the wine and aromatics, I could have happily drunk a glass. Also, it's the first time I've successfully glazed anything.

As always, adjusted the recommended temps downward.

I agree - it is a wonderful dish. And the fresh herbs at the end just make it that much better. Viva la herb!

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i'm not marlene, but i, too, am dying to try her short ribs...if it ever gets to be braining weather here in southern CA...so i have it bookmarked.

marlene's short rib recipe

"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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I've made some good stuff from this book also. The braised brussel sprouts are really good - but then I like them.

Nice to see you posting again Marlene.

thx! I wasn't home much this summer. Now it's time to bring out Molly's book again and get braising, which is my favourite way to cook in the winter. (I'm still not all that sure about this curdled milk thing though) :huh:

The first time I tried braising in milk was with a Jamie Oliver recipe for Chicken wiht Lemon and Sage. I was scared......but intrigued......... :shock: I tend to be afraid of things with curds in them (texture, texture, texture) but it was really good!!!

Haven't tried Molly's yet but it is on the fall list.

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Ok - I am obviously excited that fall is here as I just took up a page and a half on this thread........please forgive me!!! :rolleyes:

Tonight I am making the Chicken Do-Piaza. I have only made one thing ever with Tumeric and am looking forward to seeing how this turns out.

I haven't made ghee before......is it worth making or will the alternate vegetable oil do just as well?

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The chicken do-piaza was the first dish I made out of this book, and it was really good. If I recall, I just used regular butter. The reason to use ghee would be the higher smoke point, but I didn't have any problems with the milk solids burning. I do think that the butter flavor is important to the dish, though.

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i'm not marlene, but i, too, am dying to try her short ribs...if it ever gets to be braining weather here in southern CA...so i have it bookmarked.

marlene's short rib recipe

THANK YOU!!!!

The recipe is also easily findable in RecipeGullet

and just in case you've forgotten what they look like :biggrin:

gallery_6080_205_33813.jpg

Edited by Marlene (log)

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Has anyone ever tried the short ribs using boneless short ribs? I know, the bones add a lot of flavor. However, Costco has really nice boneless short ribs, and hey, Julia Child loved the meat from Costco. Just wondered if anyone has tried it.

BTY, they come in long portions so you can cut them to any size you want. Is that appalling?

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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I have never seen boneless short ribs at Costco. Then again, I've never seen short ribs at Costco. It must be an American Costco thing. Canadian costco's just don't seem to carry them. I'd say, yes you could use them but a couple of things, you may not get quite as much flavour without the bone, but a good reduction sauce will help with that. Make sure the ribs do have a good fat layer because you'll need that for flavour as well. If the boneless ribs are scrawny and fatless, pass on by.

I tie the bone in ones because they've been known to fall apart on me after braising for four hours. I'd probably tie boneless ones as well.

Edited by Marlene (log)

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I made the "Braised Halibut Steaks with Creamy Leeks" for supper last night. It was delicious. The leeks cooked to a very soft, creamy succulent texture and the halibut was perfecty cooked while still being moist.

I followed the receipe exactly (unusual, but true).

This one is a keeper. I will also try it with salmon.

Life is short, eat dessert first

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Has anyone ever tried the short ribs using boneless short ribs? I know, the bones add a lot of flavor. However, Costco has really nice boneless short ribs, and hey, Julia Child loved the meat from Costco. Just wondered if anyone has tried it.

BTY, they come in long portions so you can cut them to any size you want. Is that appalling?

i did them this weekend. of course, i prefer the bone-in ribs, but the costco ones lured me because (1) i was there and (2) they looked awfully good, even without their bones. they were fabulous....i took them to a friend's house, and even though we had had a million appetizers, people were groaning over their goodness, and fighting over the left-overs. reallly, really tasty and tender. i braised them about 3 1/2 hours and did not tie them. (i added a touch of tomato paste when sauteing the veg, but otherwise followed the recipe faithfully.)

thanks, marlene...can't wait to do them again...hopefully it will be braising weather here soon!

"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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I'm here to vouch for hhlodesign's braised pork belly and sao bing sandwiches. That's one of the best pork sandwiches I've ever tasted in my life!

We're getting another week of sunny and warm days, but braising weather is just around the corner, and I have some beautiful short ribs in the freezer.

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