Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

south philly pizza q?


katbert
 Share

Recommended Posts

I tried digging through the old pizza club threads and the google search on the site wasn't too helpful-- any recommendations on pizza that we can get delivered to 10th & fitzwater for a movie night? I'm thinking maybe Joe's although we'd be happy to try one of the south philly places. No car so I'd rather not pick up unless it's the best pizza ever in walkable distance. tia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried digging through the old pizza club threads and the google search on the site wasn't too helpful-- any recommendations on pizza that we can get delivered to 10th & fitzwater for a movie night? I'm thinking maybe Joe's although we'd be happy to try one of the south philly places. No car so I'd rather not pick up unless it's the best pizza ever in walkable distance. tia.

I would suggest stgopping into Sarcone's Bakery on 9th and scoring a tray of their favbulous bakery pizza; there are usually at least 5 different styles available, and I'll bet you could mix and match slices, and gently warm them at home for a few minutes at 325 degrees. Far superior to what you could get delivered.

Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would suggest stgopping into Sarcone's Bakery on 9th and scoring a tray of their favbulous bakery pizza; there are usually at least 5 different styles available, and I'll bet you could mix and match slices, and gently warm them at home for a few minutes at 325 degrees.  Far superior to what you could get delivered.

Unfortunately they won't be open tonight (I think they usually close by 3?) by the time we get back after work and no one can stop by during the day beforehand. But I agree their pizza's fab and close. (Also they sell those big preshaped mostly baked pizza shells for super cheap, $1.35 for 2 large).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try Franco & Luigi's "Stadium Club" Pizza at 2400 South 10th. Phone number is 215.755.5411. Their pizzas with fresh ricotta, prosciutto and spinach are a fave with Miss Claire and I, and the other pizzas the Pizza Club tried there (including the glorious work of edible art "Christmas pie" that they were nice enough to give to us) were all top notch. You're certainly within a reasonable 20 block radius. See if they deliver to your address.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Franco and Luigi are really good. I haven't had their pizza in ages-- they don't deliver to me, and for a long time, I didn't have a car-- but it's one of my favorites. The fresh ricotta pies are terrific, and I think their tomato pie (no cheese, no toppings other than fresh basil) is the best in the city.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We ordered from F & L and had a white 1/2 broccoli, 1/2 spinach, a plain cheese, a sausage and a tomato & eggplant. The pizza was fine for delivery-- I think the key to the crispy crust that I like is reheating. I took some home and will probably have it for breakfast tomorrow. mmm. breakfast pizza. Thanks guys.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The pizza was fine for delivery-- I think the key to the crispy crust that I like is reheating.

Yeah, sitting in a cardboard delivery box doesn't help any pizza's crust. That's probably why I've almost completely given up on delivery pizza since I've moved to Philly: better to travel to the good stuff. But reheating works wonders as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The pizza was fine for delivery-- I think the key to the crispy crust that I like is reheating.

Yeah, sitting in a cardboard delivery box doesn't help any pizza's crust. That's probably why I've almost completely given up on delivery pizza since I've moved to Philly: better to travel to the good stuff. But reheating works wonders as well.

I'll have to remember that. Oven, not microwave, right?

I ordered a large "Brooklyn Style" pizza last night from NYPD Pizza, about which I've posted elsewhere on this forum. (A Brooklyn Style pizza is their loaded version, with sausage, pepperoni--added after the pizza emerges from the oven, a smart move if you're taking it out as I was--green peppers, onions and mushrooms, with anchovies optional; I exercised the option on half the pie.) The pie was enormous--18 inches in diameter, bigger than the box they put it in--and it cooked in the box all the way home, steam rising constantly from the corners.

When I pulled out a slice, that really crunchy crust that I fell in love with on my first visit had gone flabby--though not soggy, thank God.

While I was waiting for my pie, BTW, I had a nice chat with the owner's daughter. The owner is from New York, and had toyed with the idea of opening a New York-style pizzeria in Chicago before deciding to move here because it's closer. (NYPD's menu includes a Chicago-style deep dish pie, which takes twice as long to prepare.) No, he wasn't a New York City cop, but he does have a collection of model police cars on display along one wall--one from New York, one from Detroit, one from Italy, a fourth from I forget where, and two from Philadelphia. Those last two were donated by two Philly cops who came into the place--no doubt intrigued by the name--and complained when they noted no Philly cop cars in the collection.

Next time, I'm ordering a less-loaded pie, to see if its crust survives the trip better.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Next time, I'm ordering a less-loaded pie, to see if its crust survives the trip better.

you could also turn on your oven to 550 with a pizza stone in it when you order the pie, and when you get back to your house, just toss each piece on the stone for a couple minutes before eating it. like they do at a pizza place when you order a slice.

i don't know how it would work, but why not...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you could also turn on your oven to 550 with a pizza stone in it when you order the pie, and when you get back to your house, just toss each piece on the stone for a couple minutes before eating it.  like they do at a pizza place when you order a slice. 

i don't know how it would work, but why not...

It works extremely well, I can testify! Even rejuvenates day-old refrigerated slices pretty well in terms of crust texture, although the sauce density is often negatively impacted...

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Next time, I'm ordering a less-loaded pie, to see if its crust survives the trip better.

you could also turn on your oven to 550 with a pizza stone in it when you order the pie, and when you get back to your house, just toss each piece on the stone for a couple minutes before eating it. like they do at a pizza place when you order a slice.

i don't know how it would work, but why not...

That'd work fine, I think.  But my experience is that if all you're looking for is recrispitalization (as opposed to full pizzafication) even a toaster oven works pretty well.

Okay, I did a test on reheating a cold slice on a hot stone and in the toaster oven, and mrbigjas is right: the stone works way better. More even heating, which means no burnt edges or toppings. (Of course, it takes a lot longer and uses more energy, too: but this is pizza we're talking about. It's worth it.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you could also turn on your oven to 550 with a pizza stone in it when you order the pie, and when you get back to your house, just toss each piece on the stone for a couple minutes before eating it.  like they do at a pizza place when you order a slice. 

i don't know how it would work, but why not...

It works extremely well, I can testify! Even rejuvenates day-old refrigerated slices pretty well in terms of crust texture, although the sauce density is often negatively impacted...

I went out and bought a pizza screen at Fante's a few weeks back. (Aside: My first homemade pizza was a flop--I burnt the crust. The pie had been in the oven for about 15 minutes at 550F.)

Would this method work with a screen as well? And should I have baked the from-scratch pie at 550F?

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what's a pizza screen?

A pizza screen is a round screen which an uncooked pizza is placed on before it goes into the oven. It helps to better brown the bottom crust. These are usually (but not exclusively) used in pizza shops that have a tunnel oven which is a large commercial oven where a large chain conveyor bakes the pizza as it goes from one end to the other. Pizza goes in one end raw and comes out the other end baked. Some like to reheat a slice or two on a screen, that works pretty well. I personally like using a pizza stone. i don't care for pizza baked in a tunnel oven, which is how most of the big chains do it. Too doughy and not crisp enough IMHO.

...and if you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce it tastes alot more like prunes than rhubarb does. groucho

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what's a pizza screen?

A pizza screen is a round screen which an uncooked pizza is placed on before it goes into the oven. It helps to better brown the bottom crust. These are usually (but not exclusively) used in pizza shops that have a tunnel oven which is a large commercial oven where a large chain conveyor bakes the pizza as it goes from one end to the other. Pizza goes in one end raw and comes out the other end baked. Some like to reheat a slice or two on a screen, that works pretty well. I personally like using a pizza stone. i don't care for pizza baked in a tunnel oven, which is how most of the big chains do it. Too doughy and not crisp enough IMHO.

Needless to say, I don't have a tunnel oven.

Aside from the fact that it was overcooked, I thought the screen worked well in my regular oven.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...