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Cabbage Rolls


ducphat30
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How about the pronunciation?

Interesting to see it spelled, b/c growing up in central CT with a large Polish community I heard it spoken more than saw it written.

We called them, (phonetic spelling): gah-LUMP-kees.

Is this close to how it's pronounced?

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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hmm yeah, my friends family pronounced it with an H at the begining....like huloopkee

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The correct spelling is gołąbki. My attempt at the pronunciation is go-WOMP-kee. In Polish, the first sound is definitely a 'g', not an 'h'. Holoopki sounds like Chech, or another Slavic language. The ł is roughly equivalent to 'w' in english, ą is similar to 'on' in the word tongue.

It literally translates to 'little pigeons'.

The difference between theory and practice is much smaller in theory than it is in practice.

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The correct spelling is gołąbki.  My attempt at the pronunciation is go-WOMP-kee.  In Polish, the first sound is definitely a 'g', not an 'h'.  Holoopki sounds like Chech, or another Slavic language.  The ł is roughly equivalent to 'w' in english, ą is similar to 'on' in the word tongue.

It literally translates to 'little pigeons'.

Though my father is from Poland, the area he was from was sometimes poland, sometimes russia - it could be Ukranian. I always assumed that it was Polish with the Ha-Lope-chee - but who knows?

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Though my father is from Poland, the area he was from was sometimes poland, sometimes russia - it could be Ukranian.  I always assumed that it was Polish with the Ha-Lope-chee - but who knows?

Your father was probably following a Ukrainian pronunciation. He also might have been influenced by the predominant pronunciation of the immigrant community where he arrived. For example, the Polish community in Chicago speaks a distinct dialect of polish, and many words are pronounced quite differently than in Poland.

The difference between theory and practice is much smaller in theory than it is in practice.

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[...]ą is similar to 'on' in the word tongue.[...]

I wonder how you pronounce that word. I pronounce tongue "tung" or sometimes "tun-g@" with the @ being a schwa.

I found this Polish Pronunciation Guide - it's much better than my attempt at "hooked-on phonics."

The difference between theory and practice is much smaller in theory than it is in practice.

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I think the problem with my pronunciation may lie in the fact that I am a child of a man born in Poland, which may have been under Russian rule, born to parents who mostly spoke Yiddish (mostly German/Polish/hebrew mix) at home - who then moved to rural Saskatchewan when he was only 3 and lived in a Jewish colony with other Jews from all over europe speaking different languages - surrounded by Ukranians.

I can't understand why my word may be wrong ;)

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Cool, interesting discussion. Interesting to know the literal tranlation as "little pigeons" too.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Just was in the company of some people that imigrated from Poland a few years ago and they pronounced it Ga wum kee. As for us we call them piggies and you better get out of the way when they hit the table. My wife makes them with a tomato sauce, my aunt does it with tomato sauce with sour cream, and some other reletives with saurkraut. The best meat filling for me is ground pork and beaf with the rice.

Polack

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This is great! My Czech grandmother always called them Ga-lump-kees and it just now dawned on me that it was a Czech word and not her doing child-speak!

Note to self: MUST do Czech excursion to Inverness soon....

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You can learn the damnedest things on egullet :raz:. One of the things I love about this site. Growing up in Texas, we called them guh-LUHM-kees. I'm really surprised we were as close to correct as we were :biggrin:.

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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