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Giles Coren


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  • 1 month later...

In his 15 March review of Goodfellas in Belfast (click), Giles Coren wrote, "You may notice that I have no review in today’s Magazine. This is because I have taken a couple of weeks off to steel myself for the most savage onslaught yet known on some far harder targets much closer to home. And the harder they come, the harder they will fall."

Does anyone know if that "savage onslaught" has yet appeared or if he was just being a big old scruffy-bearded tease?

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Well, could be I suppose but would that really necessitate taking time off his column to write? I was hoping for a more Jay Rayner style "take down" (see his current review http://lifeandhealth.guardian.co.uk/food/s...2275843,00.html

"I have no problem taking down big, expensive restaurants which are delivering far less than their pricing demands.").

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Well, could be I suppose but would that really necessitate taking time off his column to write? I was hoping for a more Jay Rayner style "take down" (see his current review http://lifeandhealth.guardian.co.uk/food/s...2275843,00.html

"I have no problem taking down big, expensive restaurants which are delivering far less than their pricing demands.").

The article has had over 200 responses, most of them indignant and rather fiery (I expect it's the heartburn). A few bloggers are raging too.

When he said 'closer to home' he may have meant it in relation to all his readers.

Perhaps he just needed to get all his facts straight before he launched this particular onslaught, which is more on a cherished National institution than on a lauded establishment. He's certainly hit a nerve though. It's an attack on a very sacred culinary cow... I mean pig. People are genuinely livid.

(PS - couldn't see a 'take down' in your link - just a very complimentary review)

Edited by MoGa (log)
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Well, could be I suppose but would that really necessitate taking time off his column to write? I was hoping for a more Jay Rayner style "take down" (see his current review http://lifeandhealth.guardian.co.uk/food/s...2275843,00.html

"I have no problem taking down big, expensive restaurants which are delivering far less than their pricing demands.").

The article has had over 200 responses, most of them indignant and rather fiery (I expect it's the heartburn). A few bloggers are raging too.

I tried six times to get a response up to his breakfast post and got modded out every time. No swearies, no ad hominems, I just pointed out that the working class during the industrial revolution didn't often eat fried breakfast and that, according to Kenney-Herbert and others, it originated in the country houses of the aristocracy.

Shame really. If I'd bartled indignantly about a my degree or spouted ill-informed drivel about low carb diets it would clearly have got through.

Edited by Tim Hayward (log)

Tim Hayward

"Anyone who wants to write about food would do well to stay away from

similes and metaphors, because if you're not careful, expressions like

'light as a feather' make their way into your sentences and then where are you?"

Nora Ephron

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