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Food Pronunciation Guide for the Dim-witted


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oh the FRENCH f-word!

while my post was a joke, i have to admit that i actually didn't know what Tess was talking about.

Well then, happy to have clarified that one for you. :cool:

I've never heard of this or thought of this. Maybe as a native speaker I'm missing the humour here. F word? I know what the F word is, but I don't see it bouilliabaisse. I see the verb abaisse as it is containted whole in bouilliabaisse.

Read Ben's explanation of baiser. It's to kiss not to fuck.

bouilli = boiled *[adjective-adverb]

bouilli = boiled *[verb]

abaisse = crust *[noun-feminine]

abaisse = reduces *[verb]

bouillia is not a word

baisse = lowers *[verb]

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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According to my Petit Robert, "baiser" usually means "to kiss" come "donner un baiser a quelqu'un". Action de poser sa bouche sur une personne, une signed'affection , de respect, ie: suck face, kiss hand, etc.  In certain contextual situations yes, the term has a more carnal significance. Sometimes there is great confusion when mademoiselle breathlessly urges "baise moi".  It's all in the perception and context, you see. :laugh:

Used as a noun, "un baiser" is indeed a kiss, a term you'd actually use with family or children. As a verb, well, feel free. Certainly a nicer term that "foutre" in any case.

Can you pee in the ocean?

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chefzadi, I think it is the fact that you're a native speaker. It happens to me because I can only partially understand French, and then I hear someone who can only partially speak it, so I try to make sense of it thinking of the few words I know.

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chefzadi, I think it is the fact that you're a native speaker. It happens to me because I can only partially understand French, and then I hear someone who can only partially speak it, so I try to make sense of it thinking of the few words I know.

You are absolutely right Tess. I hear things in Korean that make my wife look at me like "WHERE did you get THAT?"

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Moët & Chandon is another trick for the unsuspecting.  Moët, so I've read, is actually Dutch and the "t" is pronounced (Chandon is French).

THW

Yes, this is true...the 'T' in Moet is pronounced.

Speaking of Champagne...how about pronouncing the city of 'Reims'? :huh:

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Caipirinha?

Timbale?

Cay-peer-eenyah

Tim-bahl-lay

"I'm not eating it...my tongue is just looking at it!" --My then-3.5 year-old niece, who was NOT eating a piece of gum

"Wow--this is a fancy restaurant! They keep bringing us more water and we didn't even ask for it!" --My 5.75 year-old niece, about Bread Bar

"He's jumped the flounder, as you might say."

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Caipirinha?

Timbale?

Caipirinha looks like Portuguese to me, so my guess would be

kai (long i vowel sound) pee REEN yah

Timbale, I think, is both Spanish and Italian

teem BAH leh

As for pho, there is a little upward lilt, as though you're asking a question, so I'd liken it to asking "huh?", only with the 'f' sound in place of the 'h' in the beginning.

As for mille feuille - agreed that it is so very difficult to describe the pronunciation with English phonics.

I've also heard a lot of fwah gWah, but I guess it's because the gutteral 'r' is not really found in English.

*Edit : Oh, and it's SAHLssah, NOT SAHLzuh.

Edited by bottomlesspit (log)

sg

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I am terribly French challenged. Whenever I'm in a French restaurant I get stage fright when it's time to order. I think to myself, "is that "t" or "s" at the end pronounced?" Drives me nuts.

Don't let it. You're the customer.

And if you're in French restaurant in the U.S. or U.K., just translate it into English: "I'll have the frog's thighs, please."

In France just point to the menu item and say "ceci". Smile warmly, they'll smile back.

Is there a French wine pronounciation guide out there somewhere? I must apologize in advance to all you sumMAHlyerz for when I come to your restaurant and attempt to order the GevREE ShamBERTin.

What can I say? I'm a rube.

Hey! you took my new quote!! gotta love dire straits...

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How about Gewurtztraminer??

ga-vertz-trah-mee-ner

Just how it's spelled... :laugh:

This is the correct pronunciation--and with the accent on "vurtz" as bottomlesspit indicated.

My mom (a native German speaker) often answers my pronunciation questions with "just the way it's spelled" :smile:

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I have a couple:

Gnocchi for one.  I've always pronounced it 'no-key' with a slght soft g sound before the n, sorta like in gnome.  My roomate insists on saying 'yonkee'.  Please tell me I have the correct version of this one.

Also...

Gyro.  Is it like 'Jai-Roh' or 'Eeh-Roh', I have heard both are supposedly authentic...

for gyro think hero...thats how iv e heard it pronounced in many a greek restaurant

gnocci

ive always heard it pronounced as nochee

a recipe is merely a suggestion

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I exagerated. Salisbury the place is sometimes pronounced Sarum.

as in

There was a young curate of Salisbury

Whose manners were quite Halisbury-Scalisbury

He wandered round Hampshire

Without any pampshire

Till the Vicar compelled him to Warisbury

There is the famous Iron Age hill fort of Old Sarum which is near Salisbury. I wonder if this is an issue of geography rather than pronounciation.

Don't know if this is food related, but if you want a train ticket to Hereford, you'd better be able to say "heeryfurd" or you won't get one.

That Wendy Brodie person, whose vocal tones by themselves make me grit my teeth, caused me to break several molars last night when she started carrying on about "deeANNchoo" pears. :shock:

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

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[...]

gnocci

ive  always  heard  it  pronounced  as  nochee

That's gnocchi, and it's "nyok(k)i." "Gn" in Italian is like "ni" in "onion." "Nochee" would be spelled "noci." Noce means "walnut." Perhaps you're thinking of that word.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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:laugh:
Dean, pho crying' out loud! (fuh, right?).

ive always heard it pronounced like fo...as in fe fi fo fum....... :laugh:

I believe it's definitely "fuh," though, deriving from the French "pôt au feu."

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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I have a couple:

Gnocchi for one.  I've always pronounced it 'no-key' with a slght soft g sound before the n, sorta like in gnome.  My roomate insists on saying 'yonkee'.  Please tell me I have the correct version of this one.

Also...

Gyro.  Is it like 'Jai-Roh' or 'Eeh-Roh', I have heard both are supposedly authentic...

for gyro think hero...thats how iv e heard it pronounced in many a greek restaurant

Yes, but with the "he-" a bit aspirated, if that's the right term, and the "r" not as "errr" as in English.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Sorry for the rave and if someone else mentioned this already I'll be shocked. Anyway we were

ready to rip out our hair after hearing the MIL say "SCOLL - OPS" for the past 3 weeks :rolleyes:

I seem to remember some New England-y friends telling me a long time ago that that's the correct pronounciation.

How about Quahog? Both KO-hog and QUO-hog are indicated as correct, but I always heard it the first way.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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According to my Petit Robert, "baiser" usually means "to kiss" come "donner un baiser a quelqu'un". Action de poser sa bouche sur une personne, une signed'affection , de respect, ie: suck face, kiss hand, etc.  In certain contextual situations yes, the term has a more carnal significance. Sometimes there is great confusion when mademoiselle breathlessly urges "baise moi".  It's all in the perception and context, you see. :laugh:

I've never heard of this or thought of this. Maybe as a native speaker I'm missing the humour here. F word? I know what the F word is, but I don't see it bouilliabaisse. I see the verb abaisse as it is containted whole in bouilliabaisse.

Read Ben's explanation of baiser. It's to kiss not to fuck.

Actuellement, the French verb "baiser" must be used with the qualifying verb and preposition "donner un baiser a quelqu'un" (literally, to give someone a kiss) as noted in Ben's explanation above. Otherwise, without the qualifier, its usage changes to a colloquialism for "to fuck".

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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I exagerated. Salisbury the place is sometimes pronounced Sarum.

as in

There was a young curate of Salisbury

Whose manners were quite Halisbury-Scalisbury

He wandered round Hampshire

Without any pampshire

Till the Vicar compelled him to Warisbury

I extended this to steak..

There are many similar English place and family names that are not spoken the way they are spelt.

Cockburn I mentioned above,  Other food related ones might be  Worcester (sauce) pronounced Wooster; Leicester (cheese) pronounced lester

Other examples (not a complete list by any means)

Wymondham (pronounced Wind-am),

Waldergrave (=Wawgrayve),

Mainwaring (=Mannering),

Magdalene (=Maudlin),

Caius (=Keeys),

Auchinlech (=Aflek)

Althorp – pronounced 'Awltrup'

Belvoir – pronounced 'Beever'

Cholmondely – 'Chumli'

Featherstonehaugh – 'Fanshaw'

Leominster – 'Lemster'

Leveson-Gower – 'Loosen-Gaw'

Marjoribanks – 'Marchbanks'

Ralph – 'Rafe'

Ranulph – 'Ralph'

St. John – 'Sin Jin'

Towcester – 'Toaster'

Woolfardisworthy – 'Woolseri'

Wriothesley – 'Roxli'

Menzies - 'Minges'

I know its not English, but how about Llanelli (I know how to say it, just no clue how to phoneticize it!)

Food related terms that got me when living in England were fillet (pronounced

fill-itt) and paella (with the ll pronounced as a hard L)

Get your bitch ass back in the kitchen and make me some pie!!!

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Food related terms that got me when living in England were fillet  (pronounced

fill-itt)  and paella (with the ll pronounced as a hard L)

I've always said fillet as "fill-it" and filet as "fill-ay". In my world, fillet is applied only to fish and filet is applied to meat.

Edited for stupid typo

Edited by Jensen (log)
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