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Food Pronunciation Guide for the Dim-witted


Varmint
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Was this copied in answer to my question about Bonnes Bouches?

If so, I don't get it.  :wacko: 

Can someone provide a phonetic pronunciation for me?  Is it something like

"bone-ay bo-shay"  or am I screwing it up entirely?

I know absolutely nothing about French.....

Bon (Rhymes with Don ) BOOSH

Don is pronounced "Dahn" where I come from. "Bon" uses an "o" sound followed by a nasal "n" rather than a "w" sound.

Edited by Pan (log)

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Was this copied in answer to my question about Bonnes Bouches?

If so, I don't get it.  :wacko:  

Can someone provide a phonetic pronunciation for me?  Is it something like

"bone-ay bo-shay"  or am I screwing it up entirely?

I know absolutely nothing about French.....

Bon (Rhymes with Don ) BOOSH

Don is pronounced "Dahn" where I come from. "Bon" uses an "o" sound followed by a nasal "n" rather than a "w" sound.

Bonnes is pronounced "bun." The entire phrase is pronounced "bun BOOSH."

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Was this copied in answer to my question about Bonnes Bouches?

If so, I don't get it.  :wacko: 

Can someone provide a phonetic pronunciation for me?  Is it something like

"bone-ay bo-shay"  or am I screwing it up entirely?

I know absolutely nothing about French.....

Bon (Rhymes with Don ) BOOSH

Don is pronounced "Dahn" where I come from. "Bon" uses an "o" sound followed by a nasal "n" rather than a "w" sound.

Bonnes is pronounced "bun." The entire phrase is pronounced "bun BOOSH."

Oh, I got confused about the gender/number: "bon" vs. "bonnes." "Bonne(s)" is pretty close to "bun," at least in some parts of France. :biggrin: (Based on my experience with the Nicois accent, I'd expect them to pronounce that word with two noticeable syllables...)

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Was this copied in answer to my question about Bonnes Bouches?

If so, I don't get it.  :wacko:  

Can someone provide a phonetic pronunciation for me?  Is it something like

"bone-ay bo-shay"  or am I screwing it up entirely?

I know absolutely nothing about French.....

Bon (Rhymes with Don ) BOOSH

Don is pronounced "Dahn" where I come from. "Bon" uses an "o" sound followed by a nasal "n" rather than a "w" sound.

\

Actually, that was what I was initially going to write- bahn- but then thought a rhyme would work better. Of course, I don't intend a long "O". How about rhymes with Ron? :wink:

The sea was angry that day my friends... like an old man trying to send back soup in a deli.

George Costanza

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(looking upthread)

Hmmm, I guess when I have heard it it would something between bun and bahn.

My prununciation of bun would be a little drawly to qualify.

The sea was angry that day my friends... like an old man trying to send back soup in a deli.

George Costanza

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(looking upthread)

Hmmm, I guess when I have heard it it would something between bun and bahn.

My prununciation of bun would  be a little drawly to qualify.

As browniebaker pointed out, in "bonne" and "bonnes," there is a hard "n," not a nasal "n" as in "bon" and "bons."

I hear the vowel as an "o" sound, not an "uh" or "ah" sound, but not an "o-w" sound. There is no exact equivalent in my accent/dialect of English. It's sort of half between "bone" and "bun" to me. Then again, I am no native speaker of French.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I haven't read through this entire thread, so forgive me if this has already been mentioned.

In the book Glorious French Food by James Peterson, in the begining he has several pages of french words with pronunciation guides. I learned a lot from those few pages! Of course, most of the time in a kitchen people just read it like it's English. Court Bouillon, not CAU BOO-yun.

Crazy French!

Ron Lipsky

Aspiring Chef

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The problem with all of these correct pronounciations is that you can only use them around people who know what you're talking about anyway! Whenever I pronounce something correctly in French to my friends who don't know French (ie, "au gratin") they can't understand me and I have to repeat myself with the Americanization.

in love, as in gluttony, pleasure is a matter of the utmost precision.

(italo calvino)

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How does one properly pronounce "Le Creuset"?

HEV-ee

:laugh:

the "Creu" part is like the oo in goody, not the oo in toot. And the "set" I would say nearly like say, but a bit shorter...more like the eh in meh.

I'd use a "z" consonant for the "s" in "Creuset." Is that incorrect?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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How does one properly pronounce "Le Creuset"?

HEV-ee

:laugh:

the "Creu" part is like the oo in goody, not the oo in toot. And the "set" I would say nearly like say, but a bit shorter...more like the eh in meh.

I'd use a "z" consonant for the "s" in "Creuset." Is that incorrect?

No, not at all...in describing French I'm usually concentrating on how to convey the vowel sounds, but it's definitely a Z sound rather than an S sound. *sigh* Clearly, I'm better at speaking in French than making phonetic descriptions. I left out the whole R question, too; in an English context, I don't always bother to say French words the same way I would if I were in Paris (or if I were in Montréal, which would be different again) so just avoided altogether the whole throaty R/non-throaty R. Completely properly, it's the throaty R. In a North American shop, chances are very good that it's not a throaty R, for me.

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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..I hear the vowel as an "o" sound, not an "uh" or "ah" sound, but not an "o-w" sound. There is no exact equivalent in my accent/dialect of English. It's sort of half between "bone" and "bun" to me. Then again, I am no native speaker of French.

It is most definitely "bun" :smile:

Oops... lost the reference:

pronunciatiation of "bonnes" in "bonnes bouches"

Edited by gourmande (log)

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

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How does one properly pronounce "Le Creuset"?

HEV-ee

:laugh:

the "Creu" part is like the oo in goody, not the oo in toot. And the "set" I would say nearly like say, but a bit shorter...more like the eh in meh.

..best phonetic help I've seen yet on Creuset... "Le" :biggrin: is another subject!

Just to add, the "t" in Creuset is silent, and, the "eu" sound, especially as in "fleur", "feuille" or "bleu" is very difficult for many anglophones to wrap their tongue around... most literally.

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

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..I hear the vowel as an "o" sound, not an "uh" or "ah" sound, but not an "o-w" sound. There is no exact equivalent in my accent/dialect of English. It's sort of half between "bone" and "bun" to me. Then again, I am no native speaker of French.

It is most definitely "bun" :smile:[...]

In what part of France? :biggrin::wink:

[Edited to add: All bets are off if it's Quebec. :smile:]

Edited by Pan (log)

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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