Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Food Pronunciation Guide for the Dim-witted


Varmint
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm in the scallop camp, not the "scolllop" camp (what's a scollop, anyways?)

What's a "hot"? Regional pronunciations, Deborah. In my East-Coast US pronunciation, the vowel in "hot" is like "a" as in "father," but the British have a separate "o" vowel, as I understand. And then there's Jamaican English, Australian English, New Zealand English, South African English, Scottish English, etc., etc.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm in the scallop camp, not the "scolllop" camp (what's a scollop, anyways?)

What's a "hot"? Regional pronunciations, Deborah. In my East-Coast US pronunciation, the vowel in "hot" is like "a" as in "father," but the British have a separate "o" vowel, as I understand. And then there's Jamaican English, Australian English, New Zealand English, South African English, Scottish English, etc., etc.

Yes, of course.

It's one of those English pronunciation vorteces: "scallop" and "wallop" should not rhyme if you're speaking in something resembling the standard North American newscaster accent. But if the rest of your speech resembles that of the Queen, Bob Marley, Crocodile Dundee, or Mike Meyers playing any character except Wayne Campbell, then fire away.

Disclaimer. Attempt at humour. No flames, please.

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or , if you are from certain regions of Spain:

Dool-the (the th as in thin, not the th as in that).

Yes...I'm so American-centric, my Spanish teacher was Chilean and most people with whom I have spoken Spanish are North and South American. Apologies for neglecting European Spanish!

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We just ordered Diana Bellucci's How To Pronounce French, German, and Italian Wine Names for our wine shop. It also has Spanish and Portuguese wine pronunciations. My linguistics B.A., French-speaking co-worker, by the way, can say "milles fuilles," (sp?) but I can barely remember how she said it, much less reproduce it on my computer...... sigh.

By the way, we got it used from www.abebooks.com, for much less than retail. A great source for the poor cookbook collector! Also try www.bookfinder.com, www.bibliofind.com, www.alibris.com, and www.jessicasbiscuit.com.

Edited by afn33282 (log)
Frau Farbissma: "It's a television commercial! With this cartoon leprechaun! And all of these children are trying to chase him...Hey leprechaun! Leprechaun! We want to get your lucky charms! Haha! Oh, and there's all these little tiny bits of marshmallow just stuck right in the cereal so that when the kids eat them, they think, 'Oh this is candy! I'm having fun!'"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This one's embarrassing (and it's in my native tongue!):  culinary

Cool-i-nary

Cyul-i-nary

Either cool-inary or cull-inary, certainly not cue. :smile: ...IMO at least.

I say "kyoolinery." So there! :raz:

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Either cool-inary or cull-inary, certainly not cue. :smile:  ...IMO at least.

I say "kyoolinery." So there! :raz:

:laugh:

:shock:

Really?!

You're from Noo Yawk! you should say cullinary! :raz:

I am (rather, was) an Upper West Sider. I understand there's a particular accent peculiar to the Upper West Side. Check out the alt.usage.english newsgroup on USENET for more discussions of such non-food-related matters, with all the usual caveats that apply to the unregulated world of USENET.

Oh, and I say "N'York" too.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Question...shouldn't one ask for a biscotto and not for a biscotti (which, if I recall, is the pleural form)?

Yes, just as one should order a single panino (instead of a panini) and if ordering more than one pizza ask for two pizze.

But it really is too much to ask a non-Italian speaker to remember (or even know) how to make all the various genders plural, so I can't be too bothered about it when I see or hear it incorrectly (though I do point out the error to my kids).

Since I find it a bit jarring to order a single "biscotti" and people look at me funny if I ask for a biscotto, I just make a practice of ordering more than one at a time. :wink:

Can you pee in the ocean?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favorite "plural" stories is about the farmer who was having snake problems, and he wanted to order a pair of mongoose. He wasn't sure of the plural form, though: was it mongeese? mongooses? So he wrote his letter of order as "Dear Sir, please send me a mongoose. While you're at it, send me two."

Back to topic: I was very surprised when I learned that a single noodle of the proper shape would be a 'spaghetto'. Like Lay's potato chips, I bet I can't eat just one anyway, so it's probably a moot point for me.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Either cool-inary or cull-inary, certainly not cue. :smile:  ...IMO at least.

I say "kyoolinery." So there! :raz:

:laugh:

:shock:

Really?!

You're from Noo Yawk! you should say cullinary! :raz:

I am (rather, was) an Upper West Sider. I understand there's a particular accent peculiar to the Upper West Side. Check out the alt.usage.english newsgroup on USENET for more discussions of such non-food-related matters, with all the usual caveats that apply to the unregulated world of USENET.

Oh, and I say "N'York" too.

There are 8 million stories in the Naked City...

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was in a separate thread about gyros. Apparently, the "g" is actually not a Gamma but a Chi in Greek, and is pronounced like the "ch" in "chutzpah" (but, I think, lightly sounded) ; ergo "khiro" or some such.

Sorry for jumping in so late in the thread, but that is not how Gyro is pronounced. In Greek, Gyro is written with a Gamma, not a Chi. So the sound is more like something between a "g" and a "y", something like an aspirated "y". Conformed by my native speaker boyfriend :)!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This one's embarrassing (and it's in my native tongue!):  culinary

Cool-i-nary

Cyul-i-nary

Either cool-inary or cull-inary, certainly not cue. :smile: ...IMO at least.

According to Webster's it's either cull-inary or cyul-inary. Never cool-inary. I actually had to look this up to settle an argument during my book group meeting. You know how rowdy women can get when they think they are right! :laugh:

Practice Random Acts of Toasting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This one's embarrassing (and it's in my native tongue!):  culinary

Cool-i-nary

Cyul-i-nary

Either cool-inary or cull-inary, certainly not cue. :smile: ...IMO at least.

According to Webster's it's either cull-inary or cyul-inary. Never cool-inary. I actually had to look this up to settle an argument during my book group meeting. You know how rowdy women can get when they think they are right! :laugh:

Hmmm, my opinion is not that of Webster's (or Random House, which is the only wee English language dictionary I have at home atm). Or the guy who talks on answers.com, for that matter.

I know English has some random pronunciation, but I can't see saying it that way, any more than I would say cyul de sac (oui, je sais que c'est une phrase française) or cyultivate. I am more likely to say cull than cool, but...

*runs off muttering* :wink:

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a couple:

Gnocchi for one.  I've always pronounced it 'no-key' with a slght soft g sound before the n, sorta like in gnome.  My roomate insists on saying 'yonkee'.  Please tell me I have the correct version of this one.

Also...

Gyro.  Is it like 'Jai-Roh' or 'Eeh-Roh', I have heard both are supposedly authentic...

Gnocchi: My nana & the rest of my Italian family pronounces it En-Yo-Kee.

Gyro - Different strokes on this one. I pronounce it Yur-oh, which I know is completely butchered & incorrect. I hear Jai-roh, Gee-roh, Guy-roh, Year-oh. etc.

Rock is dead. Long live paper & scissors!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a few, please don't laugh.

risotto..I have a friend who says 'rizott' with no e sound on the end and a long o. Is that the Italian way, or is it also ok to pronounce the o?

edamame...I know WHAT it is, just never heard it pronounced..help.

gravlax- is that x sounded out?

And I'm sorry, but I say biscotti - with the i. the aforementioned friend says biscot with the t ending.

is pancetta 'panchetta' or pansetta?

I have more, be nice.

I actually made a .wav-file with the correct Swedish pronunciation of gravlax, a few months after the post i question, but atleast you know how it's said in it's native language.

http://olit.no-ip.com/gravlax.wav

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...