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What's your favorite seasoning for Salmon ?


OnlyTheBest
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I would love to know what you all put on your salmon. I have seen the spices from Tom Douglas and wondered about the salmon rub....still havent bought it though.. Has anyone used it...and if so what do you think.

I usually just bake it in the oven or do it in a pan on the stove top....i would love some suggestions...maybe good local marinades...anything that you like..tell me about it.

Still trying to find that perfect seasoning.

Thanks

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the other day, i just put a little bit of olive oil and thinly sliced lemon on some salmon before putting it under the broiler and that was pretty tasty. Usually though, we do dill/olive oil//garlic/lemon juice something or other-- lots of dill.

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I marinate the fillets in: the juice of 1 lemon, 1 TB salt, 2 Tb brown sugar and a little dill ( fresh if you have it but dried is acceptable) for half an hour or so. Bake, grill, broil to desired doneness. Serve with a mustard sauce that is mayonaise enhanced with mustard and dill.

This has been a staple in my house since I got the recipe 30 years ago from an article in a Detroit newspaper about the salmon served at Joe Muer's Restaurant. Joe had a very fine seafood place in Detroit.

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Just some really good olive oil and sel gris, I rub in the salt and oil and let it sit in the fridge for an hour or so and that's it. Nothing else except a really hot grill or pan, with a little bit more olive oil.

Rocky

edited for clarity

Edited by rockdoggydog (log)
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Marinate chunks of salmon in...

Orange-thyme, mint, lemon/orange juice, white wine, cumin, shallots, olive oil, s/p

Thread onto rosemary branches and grill or broil.

Add red pepper flakes to marinade if you want some kick.

If you don't have orange-thyme use regular thyme and add a bit of grated orange zest.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

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This Broiled Salmon with Orange-Miso Glaze is one of the best salmon preparations I've ever had.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/106110

"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

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Chop up some Chinese black beans, and a little soy and rice wine, a touch of sesame oil, maybe some pepper flakes or other form of heat.

Actually the Tom Douglas rub is pretty good too. We've gone through a couple jars of it over the last few years.

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The Tom Douglas rub is good, but be careful, it has a lot of sugar, so if you're pan searing it, it can burn.

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"What's for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?"

"I say, I wonder what's going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet.

Pooh nodded thoughtfully.

"It's the same thing," he said.”

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Alton Brown's rub consisting of cumin, coriander, fennel, pepper and salt is good for the more funky species of salmon. Toast and grind the spices. Or cooking it on a soaked cedar plank on the BBQ with some oil and garlic is great especially if you want to serve the salmon cold.

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I just melt butter, add some dry mustard and lemon juice and brush it over the salmon. The butter hardens once it hits the cold salmon and I just let it sit that way for a bit then grill it. OMG, I can't wait for summer.

Practice Random Acts of Toasting

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Usually I just pan sear it with some salt, then add something like pesto on the side (which reminds me I have both salmon and pesto in the freezer that I should probably eat, if only to make enough room in the freezer so chicken carcasses don't fall out every time I open it). Whenever I've tried putting stuff on the salmon before cooking, it either falls off or burns. I imagine it would work better in the oven...

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I recently tried a new salmon recipe from the Aquavit cookbook that I can't adequately describe without profanity.

Pan seared for a few minutes on the skin side, then braised in dry sherry, soy sauce and chopped frest tarragon. Incredible flavor combination.

My family standard on the grill is to slow roast in on a piece of foil with some combination of onions, dill, celery and fennel with salt and pepper.

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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The Tom Douglas rub is good, but be careful, it has a lot of sugar, so if you're pan searing it, it can burn.

Really like these rubs - tried the Salmon Rub for the first time at the Seattle Cooks show, and have since picked up the whole line. They're on sale this week at Metropolitan Market for $3.99 a tub.

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I recently tried a new salmon recipe from the Aquavit cookbook that I can't adequately describe without profanity.

Pan seared for a few minutes on the skin side, then braised in dry sherry, soy sauce and chopped frest tarragon.  Incredible flavor combination.

That DOES sound good.

My daughter's absolute favorite meal, far and away. Marinate salmon a few hours in soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, brown sugar and chopped candied or fresh ginger. Then pan fry or grill over a moderate heat.

It was first on her "things I'm thankful for list" she her 2nd grade class put together at thanksgiving. Most of the other kids listed things like "my dog" and "Power Rangers". Heh, that's my girl. :wub:

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

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WOW!!!! Thanks everyone !!!  They all sound fabulous !!!  Now i cant wait to try them.  If anyone has more suggestions please let me know .... so far every one sounds YUMMY !!!

Thanks again!

Salt only, please. It's how the salmon is cooked that is important to me. The Pacific-Northwest has two legendary methods, one is the cedar plank grilled method. A thin plank of UNTREATED cedar that has been soaked in water a couple of hours. Then I put the cedar plank on top of the grill grate and the salmon on top of the cedar, close the grill and let the salmon cook and the cedar smolder for about 10 or 15 minutes depending on the thickness of the salmon. Don't worry about flare ups, just squirt flames out with spray bottle. More smoke, more flavor.

Now for the most eccentric method of cooking salmon I've encountered. This was to feed a large film crew who really wanted a full on Pacific-Northwest salmon feed. We built a fire directly on the concrete slab behind the restaurant with Alder wood, stacked some bricks at each end and balanced a metal bed springs over the fire, when the wood was half cooked down, the whole salmon (about 20 of them, as I recall) went on the bed springs with slices of lemon inside the salmon cavity. After about 20 minutes we each took a deep breath, waded in and flipped the whole salmon over to cook the other side. Clean up consisted of asking the maintenace guy to haul the bed springs off to the dump, take the bricks back to where ever we swiped them from and hose off the ashes. Credit for this method goes out to Peggy Hovander of Glacier, Washington at the foot of Mt. Baker Ski Area.

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I like it plain, unless I'm making shumai or something, in which case I marinate it in a mixture of soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and chopped scallions. Add water to cover. Scrape off as much of the marinade as possible before cooking. I like to make a dipping sauce by heating up some sesame oil and then removing from heat and pouring over minced garlic and ginger. Add soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, brown sugar, chopped scallions. The only missing ingredient is the wrappers. So good.

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WOW!!!! Thanks everyone !!!  They all sound fabulous !!!  Now i cant wait to try them.  If anyone has more suggestions please let me know .... so far every one sounds YUMMY !!!

Thanks again!

Salt only, please. It's how the salmon is cooked that is important to me. The Pacific-Northwest has two legendary methods, one is the cedar plank grilled method. A thin plank of UNTREATED cedar that has been soaked in water a couple of hours. Then I put the cedar plank on top of the grill grate and the salmon on top of the cedar, close the grill and let the salmon cook and the cedar smolder for about 10 or 15 minutes depending on the thickness of the salmon. Don't worry about flare ups, just squirt flames out with spray bottle. More smoke, more flavor.

Now for the most eccentric method of cooking salmon I've encountered. This was to feed a large film crew who really wanted a full on Pacific-Northwest salmon feed. We built a fire directly on the concrete slab behind the restaurant with Alder wood, stacked some bricks at each end and balanced a metal bed springs over the fire, when the wood was half cooked down, the whole salmon (about 20 of them, as I recall) went on the bed springs with slices of lemon inside the salmon cavity. After about 20 minutes we each took a deep breath, waded in and flipped the whole salmon over to cook the other side. Clean up consisted of asking the maintenace guy to haul the bed springs off to the dump, take the bricks back to where ever we swiped them from and hose off the ashes. Credit for this method goes out to Peggy Hovander of Glacier, Washington at the foot of Mt. Baker Ski Area.

Holy cow, very creative with bed springs. I'm going to try cedar planking this summer. Our place "up north" has both salmon and cedar in good supply. Thanks for the tecnique description.

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

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I've made Thomas Keller's Salmon Tartar with Sweet Red Onion Creme Fraiche (page 6 in The French Laundry Cookbook) so many times that I've adapted the primary ingredients to a variety of preparations; all taste great to me.

The primary ingredients are: lemon, chive, shallots, and red onion

Seared: mix ingredients with chopped salmon according to receipe and sear

Pan roast: brush salmon fillet with lemon oil; saute and finish in hot oven; garnish with remaining ingredients; or make a compound butter with the remaining ingredients and top the salmon with a slice

En Papilliote: place ingredients on a piece of parchment paper (or foil) wrap up air tight and bake in a hot oven

In all cases the fish is done before the grey fat starts oozing out of the fish.

Finish all with just a bit of sea salt.

Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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Usually I just pan sear it with some salt, then add something like pesto on the side (which reminds me I have both salmon and pesto in the freezer that I should probably eat, if only to make enough room in the freezer so chicken carcasses don't fall out every time I open it).  Whenever I've tried putting stuff on the salmon before cooking, it either falls off or burns.  I imagine it would work better in the oven...

I often put some (homemade!) pesto on top, and bake it at 350 till it's done. Easy and comes out yummy.

When I did it with pesto made that day and salmon caught that day, it was the best salmon I've ever eaten.

Too bad you can't buy fresh salmon in seattle.

Steve

"Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon." --Dalai Lama

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I really like good olives with salmon.

Based on a dish from Chez Panisse Menus this is good for more mild tasting spring salmon.

You poach the salmon in a classic court bouillon (water, white wine, lemon, onion, carrots, celery, herbs). Serve poached salmon with a knob of green olive butter and a black olive butter melting on top. Excellent.

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