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Real Texas chili


bobmac
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I frequently make a sort of ersatz chili with ground beef and beans because it's quick and easy. Now I plan an authentic Texas version -- no beans and am wondering what usually accompanies it since there is no vegetable.

"Last week Uncle Vinnie came over from Sicily and we took him to the Olive Garden. The next day the family car exploded."

--Nick DePaolo

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I go a couple of ways with this.

Chili, iron skillet cornbread, salad (We like a simple green salad with mandarin orange sections, red onion and a simple vinaigrette.)

Chili, Saltines, salad (This time around a chopped lettuce salad, you have to use some iceberg for it to come out, whatever other veggies float the boat and a tasty dressing of whatever sort.)

Sometimes we substitute a salsa for the vegetable kingdom portion of the meal. The current favorite is a mango and black bean version that is heavy on the mango. I don't usually add beans to my chili so the salsas with beans work out.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I always serve chili with a choice of side dishes such as warm pinto or kidney beans, salsas, corn bread (plain or jalapeno/cheddar), chips, tortillas, tamales, biscuits, or plain crackers. For optional toppings, set aside bowls of garnishes such as shredded cheddar or jack cheese, sour cream, minced onion, diced avocado, or chopped cilantro.

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I think that the general Texas no-beans chili, as long as it had big chunky (not ground) meat, would be great atop two soft, warm corn tortillas, taco style, with white onions, cilantro, crema, etc. as available garnishes.

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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Why ruin good chili with vegetables or side dishes? Meat, and tons of it. Make sure you provide fixins, like chopped onions, jalapenos and cheese, to add to the chili. If the chili is good enough, no one will be interested in salad or any of those other side things your mom always thinks has to be served. As for bread, either saltines or jalapeno cheese cornbread are the only way to go. You will need plenty of beer, preferably dark, like Shiner Bock or St. Arnold's Brown Ale. The bonus with the chili is dessert. Most likely a cobbler or banana pudding.

"As far as I'm concerned, bacon comes from a magical, happy place" Frank, John Doe

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I completely forgot to mention the garnishes. Those can get really fun.

One day, I was playing with my new KitchenAid food processor. Using the large shredder blade I shredded up some cabbage and radish. Taking a rif off of how posole is often served in Mexico, I put in on my bowl of Huevos del Toro's "Work in Progress Chili" and it was wonderful. By the way, that chili recipe is the best.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I know some of you folks are Texans, and I can't understand why nobody has mentioned guacamole. Hell, it's got all the basic food groups in it except beer :biggrin:. A "must have" (most of the time) when I make Texas chili.

THW

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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I frequently make a sort of ersatz chili with ground beef and beans because it's quick and easy. Now I plan an authentic Texas version -- no beans and am wondering what usually accompanies it since there is no vegetable.

Antacid?

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I know some of you folks are Texans, and I can't understand why nobody has mentioned guacamole.  Hell, it's got all the basic food groups in it except beer :biggrin:.  A "must have" (most of the time) when I make Texas chili.

THW

I think because guacamole is more of a California thing than a Texas thing, possibly

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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I know some of you folks are Texans, and I can't understand why nobody has mentioned guacamole.  Hell, it's got all the basic food groups in it except beer :biggrin:.  A "must have" (most of the time) when I make Texas chili.

THW

I think because guacamole is more of a California thing than a Texas thing, possibly

I beg to differ, my friend :biggrin:. I spent the first 26 years of my life in Fort Worth, and we always had guacamole with chili and also with enchiladas, cheese and chili. We always used the dark, rough skinned ones (Hass, aka "alligator pears") to make the real thing. And that is pure Tex Mex, dating back (at least) to the 1960s.

THW

Edited to correct dumb spelling mistakes. Hey, I'm on my second bourbon and water, so I have a good excuse :raz:.

Edited by hwilson41 (log)

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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Antacid?

Mayhaw, your Phillistine side is showing :raz:.

THW

I'm just here to help. I like chili. I like it with beans, and other stuff. Black olives. Whole plum tomatoes. You know, heretical ingredients. I know that I should shut up and go away as you guys are discussing that thin red gruel that passes for food in some areas of the country-and I can respect that. Everyone needs a strange native food, and I guess that one is good as any. :wink::raz::laugh:

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Until I tried "Work In Progress Chili" the following recipe was the family favorite. I saw the original in Southern Lining some years ago and tweaked it as usual. This is the final version that "stuck." I have even mixed up the spice mixture and mailed it to my son or daughter since, unless you have an extensive spice cabinet it would cost a bloody fortune. I have since heard that chili of this type is called Cincinatti Chili. Soes anyone know if that is true?

It certainly isn't Texas Style . . . whatever that is. My dad always swore by the Pedernales Chili recipe that was supposed to be favored at the LBJ ranch. Interestingly enough, the recipe is published in the LBJ Library site here.

Bodacious Chili

Adapted from the recipe in Southern Living

2 lbs chuck in ½” cubes

2 large onions, chopped

3 stalks celery cut in 1” pieces

1 large red bell pepper, chopped

4 jalapenos, seeded and diced

1 cup mushrooms, sliced (Portobellos are really good)

4 cloves garlic, minced

3 T olive oil

Start meat in oil and when beginning to brown add other ingredients. Continue to cook on medium high until vegetables begin to cook.

Stir in:

3 T cocoa

3 T ancho chili powder

1 t cayenne or arbol (optional)

1 t ground cumin

2 t cumin seeds

2 t dried Mexican oregano

2 t paprika

1 t ground tumeric

½ t salt

1 t ground cardamom

1 t ground pepper

1 T molasses

3/4 cup red wine

2 cans chopped tomatoes

1 can drained kidney beans

1 can drained garbanzos

Simmer covered for 1 ½ hours.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Until I tried "Work In Progress Chili" the following recipe was the family favorite. I saw the original in Southern Lining some years ago and tweaked it as usual. This is the final version that "stuck." I have even mixed up the spice mixture and mailed it to my son or daughter since, unless you have an extensive spice cabinet it would cost a bloody fortune. I have since heard that chili of this type is called Cincinatti Chili. Soes anyone know if that is true?

It certainly isn't Texas Style . . . whatever that is. My dad always swore by the Pedernales Chili recipe that was supposed to be favored at the LBJ ranch. Interestingly enough, the recipe is published in the LBJ Library site here.

Bodacious Chili

Adapted from the recipe in Southern Living

2 lbs chuck in ½” cubes

2 large onions, chopped

3 stalks celery cut in 1” pieces

1 large red bell pepper, chopped

4 jalapenos, seeded and diced

1 cup mushrooms, sliced (Portobellos are really good)

4 cloves garlic, minced

3 T olive oil

Start meat in oil and when beginning to brown add other ingredients.  Continue to cook on medium high until vegetables begin to cook.

Stir in:

3 T cocoa

3 T  ancho chili powder

1 t cayenne or arbol (optional)

1 t ground cumin

2 t cumin seeds

2 t dried Mexican oregano

2 t paprika

1 t ground tumeric

½ t salt

1 t ground cardamom

1 t ground pepper

1 T molasses

3/4 cup red wine

2 cans chopped tomatoes

1 can drained kidney beans

1 can drained garbanzos

Simmer covered for 1 ½ hours.

:laugh: Ah Mushrooms.... Hangum Boys.... :biggrin:

Sounds like a good recipe but I would not pass it off as "chili" @ least not in West Texas...

Never trust a skinny chef

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:laugh:

I thought the garbanzos were the ultimate sin. They do call it Cincinatti don't they? Anyway, it is pretty in the bowl and it tastes good.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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:laugh:

I thought the garbanzos were the ultimate sin. They do call it Cincinatti don't they? Anyway, it is pretty in the bowl and it tastes good.

Yep made the mistake about telling a friend of mine from Lubock about "Cincinatti chili" His comment is "their ain't no such thang" It's Cincinatti Tomato Stew, that those "yankees" just got confused. :laugh:

Never trust a skinny chef

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:laugh:

I thought the garbanzos were the ultimate sin. They do call it Cincinatti don't they? Anyway, it is pretty in the bowl and it tastes good.

The garbanzos, mushrooms and generous tomatoes definitely tag it as a midwestern variant. But Cincinnati chili (which owes as much or more to Europe as it does to Texas) is peculiar, even for the heartland. It includes vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, cloves, and allspice or cinnamon; uses ground beef instead of chopped or chunked; omits the tomatoes; and is invariably served on some sort of pasta -- usually macaroni or spaghetti -- with oyster crackers as a garnish.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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In my part of Texas, chili is always served with white rice. Then again, most everything is served with white rice!!! :raz:

Hmmmmm, sounds like somewhere around Beaumont, Port Arthur, Anahuac area, right :biggrin:?

THW

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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There are many ways to eat chili here in Texas. All are wrong if they aren't the way you were raised! :biggrin:

My husband was raised to believe that chili always had to be accompanied by beans, cornbread and vermicelli (cooked with onions and tomatoes).

I had never heard of such nonsense. Chili is one meal, beans and cornbread a completely different meal. Forget the vermicelli.

We still argue about it. :laugh:

Chili and tamales are the traditonal Christmas Eve dinner in our home. It is accompanied by chopped onions, jalapenos, cheese and pico de gallo, but never sour cream.

During the rest of the year, it might be served with cornbread or rice with some sliced tomatoes and green onions on the side.

Edited by Lone Star (log)

If you can't act fit to eat like folks, you can just set here and eat in the kitchen - Calpurnia

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I know some of you folks are Texans, and I can't understand why nobody has mentioned guacamole.  Hell, it's got all the basic food groups in it except beer :biggrin:.  A "must have" (most of the time) when I make Texas chili.

THW

I think because guacamole is more of a California thing than a Texas thing, possibly

I beg to differ, my friend :biggrin:. I spent the first 26 years of my life in Fort Worth, and we always had guacamole with chili and also with enchiladas, cheese and chili. We always used the dark, rough skinned ones (Hass, aka "alligator pears") to make the real thing. And that is pure Tex Mex, dating back (at least) to the 1960s.

THW

Edited to correct dumb spelling mistakes. Hey, I'm on my second bourbon and water, so I have a good excuse :raz:.

We (in south louisiana) call mirlitons alligator pears because of the way the end looks..like it has teeth. Mirlitons are the same thing as chayote squash for you to the west, and vegetable pears for you to the east. they are not the same things, obviously, as avacado's. Sorry, just didn't want some poor LaLa student trying to make chili w/a mirliton....although...

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