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Best Recipes from Cookbooks or Labels


Chris Amirault
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A few years back, there was some reference text that had a compilation of indexes for about fifty common cookbooks. It didn't do too well, I believe, but I've always thought that it was a good idea: a place where you could look up and find, say, seven recipes for brownies or carbonara from Joy of Cooking, NYT Cookbook, Fannie Farmer, etc. Problem was, you didn't know which one was actually a good recipe -- unless you tried all of them.

Lately, I've been thinking that we on eGullet could do something like that. I mean, I know that the proportions in How to Cook Everything are really great for the meatballs I make, and Kenyon's corn meal has a great cornbread recipe on it. I also believe that the collected wisdom of eGullet far, far, far surpasses that of Christopher Kimball and "America's" Test Kitchen. :angry:

So I ask you: what cookbook or label recipe do you turn to for pancakes? Souffle? Chicken soup? Oatmeal cookies? Why that one? Do you tweak it?

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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A few years back, there was some reference text that had a compilation of indexes for about fifty common cookbooks. It didn't do too well, I believe, but I've always thought that it was a good idea: a place where you could look up and find, say, seven recipes for brownies or carbonara from Joy of Cooking, NYT Cookbook, Fannie Farmer, etc. Problem was, you didn't know which one was actually a good recipe -- unless you tried all of them.

Lately, I've been thinking that we on eGullet could do something like that. I mean, I know that the proportions in How to Cook Everything are really great for the meatballs I make, and Kenyon's corn meal has a great cornbread recipe on it. I also believe that the collected wisdom of eGullet far, far, far surpasses that of Christopher Kimball and "America's" Test Kitchen. :angry:

So I ask you: what cookbook or label recipe do you turn to for pancakes? Souffle? Chicken soup? Oatmeal cookies? Why that one? Do you tweak it?

The one I use most was found on the discount table 15 years ago "The Complete Book of Pasta" by Jack Denton Scott. It has gotten me threw more what's fast, quick and easy moments than any other cookbook. :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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green bean casserole. Canned mushroom soup and french fried onions. LOL NOT

seriously though, when I need a chocolate cake, I usually always make Hersheys Black Magic cake. Moist, chocolatey, one bowl and fast.

Always gets rave reviews.

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The one I use most was found on the discount table 15 years ago "The Complete Book of Pasta" by Jack Denton Scott. It has gotten me threw more what's fast, quick and easy moments than any other cookbook. :biggrin:  :biggrin:  :biggrin:

What specific recipes do you use there?

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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So I ask you: what cookbook or label recipe do you turn to for pancakes? Souffle? Chicken soup? Oatmeal cookies? Why that one? Do you tweak it?

The Shepherd's Pie recipe in Cooking for Dummies is pretty groovy. I tweak it by adding cheese to the mashed potatoes, and by doubling the amount of stock specified in the recipe.

* AB drinks one of those "Guiness Pub Draught" beers, with the nitrogen cannister in the bottom of the can.

* AB wonders what Budweiser would taste like with one of those...

<AB> . o O (Like shit, still, I should think.)

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I make the meatloaf on the back of the Lipton's Onion Soup Mix package

http://www.recipesecrets.com/recipeDisplay...=6025&Version=1

I usually add a little more ground beef (because I buy the family pack it usually has about 2.5 to 3 lbs) and a little more water. It comes out nice and moist, and most importantly the kids will eat it.

Choc chip cookies: Toll house cookies on the back of the package (sometimes I add different choc or nuts and raisins.

Gourmet Cookbook: Pierogi dough

Dom Delouise (sp?): His grandmother's meatball recipe (I add a little more spice) and somtimes add italian pork sausage instead of plain ground pork.

Once Upon a Tart: Lemon Tart

King Arthur Baking Book: Popovers

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King Arthur Baking Book: Popovers

Oooh! I have made the popovers in the NYT Cookbook for years. Why do you like the KABB recipe?! Do tell!

Add all ingredients to the blender, mix, let rest, pour into muffin pan and bake. You don't have to use a special popover pan, they are easy to make and they have always come out well. The recipe is on their website if you want to try them

http://ww2.kingarthurflour.com/cgibin/html...423579610963099

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