Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
fresh_a

Le Comptoir du Relais-9, carrefour de l’Odéon

Recommended Posts

Our enthusiastic reaction a couple of weeks ago is here.

Steingarten discovered him in 1966?!

He is ahead of his time!!!


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'96 is how I read it. It's interesting how we make those corrections automatically to adjust what we read to what we know. Sometimes it keeps us from learning the real truth. :biggrin:

1996 doesn't seem all that early. We first ate there in the spring of '98. Our daughter and (future) son-in-law had le Régalade reccommended to them by the Sommelier at Guy Savoy the year before and I am sure I had already read about la Régalade in an article by Pierre Franey in the Dining setion of the NY Times. I suppose Jeffrey was among the first group of American journalists to know about it however.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We first ate there in the spring of '98.

I also visited it in '98 after reading Steingarten. I disliked it so much that I didn't go back until John T recommended it strongly. I'm very glad I did. My original review is still posted with a cross-reference from the new; it's labelled "history". (like its author) :biggrin:

John Whiting, London

Whitings Writings

Top Google/MSN hit for Paris Bistros

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
'96 is how I read it. It's interesting how we make those corrections automatically to adjust what we read to what we know. Sometimes it keeps us from learning the real truth.  :biggrin:

1996 doesn't seem all that early. We first ate there in the spring of '98. Our daughter and (future) son-in-law had le Régalade reccommended to them by the Sommelier at Guy Savoy the year before and I am sure I had already read about la Régalade in an article by Pierre Franey in the Dining setion of the NY Times. I suppose Jeffrey was among the first group of American journalists to know about it however.

It said "1966", and my post has mysteriously disappeared!!


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to add to this topic but....

Has anyone eaten there recently?

Good, Bad ???

I've read that lunch is great, I've read that lunch is bad, I've read that dinner is great, I've read that dinner is too much for the style of the kitchen.

Does anyone know what days they are open?

Thanks for any information and opinions.

Al Sharff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a lovely lunch there recently with Madam Magnolia. If you arrive close to noon, you should get a table. Very much a soul food bistro, with slightly closet haute tendencies. I hear they go rather more upmarket for dinner, but unfortunately I haven't had the pleasure.

For the two of us, three courses each plus a couple of glasses of wine, bottle of water etc, I think it came in at around 35 euros a head. So, a bargain.


Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went in there last week, in person, to make a reservation for the end of next month. I read in the reviews they only take reservations 30 days in advance. As it turns out, you can't walk in and make reservations. So they directed me to the hotel next door (which they own) and I asked the woman at the desk for a reservation, and she very tersely told me "We are booked through December". The way she said it was pretty rude and haughty (and I know the difference between rude, and the Parisian reserve, and she was rude.)

I asked about the 30-day policy, and she said that was not true.

So I left.

I didn't feel the need ever to go back.

There's too many other places that are more welcoming...sans l'attitude.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I went in there last week, in person, to make a reservation for the end of next month. I read in the reviews they only take reservations 30 days in advance. As it turns out, you can't walk in and make reservations. So they directed me to the hotel next door (which they own) and I asked the woman at the desk for a reservation, and she very tersely told me "We are booked through December". The way she said it was pretty rude and haughty (and I know the difference between rude, and the Parisian reserve, and she was rude.)

I asked about the 30-day policy, and she said that was not true.

So I left.

I didn't feel the need ever to go back.

There's too many other places that are more welcoming...sans l'attitude.

I regret to say that I too heard in Paris today that reservations are now very backed up. With no disrespect to M. Camdeborde, I think he's entered the star status and David, as you said

There's too many other places
including what Bruno Doucet is now doing at Le Regalade.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do we know how significantly different, if at all, the dinner menu is from that at lunch?


Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I went in there last week, in person, to make a reservation for the end of next month... and she very tersely told me "We are booked through December".

I called for a dinner reservation when I arrived in Paris the beginning of September and was told they were booked through October 3. Did they have a list for cancellations, I asked? It is to laugh, I was told, essentially.

Walked by one lunchtime and Monsieur C. himself suggested we come back in 20 minutes. Thirty minutes later we were eating some yummy pied de porc. It became clear that if you arrive somewhat before noon they will seat you and let you wait until they begin service at noon, or if you arrive after 1:30 you will have a minimal wait for a table. As the weather deteriorates this may change, since the outdoor tables will be unavailable.

I really liked the food and wouldn't deprive myself because of a snooty reservations clerk, but that's just me. I'm happy to have a lovely long lunch if I can't have dinner. Dinner at La Regalade several weeks later was also fabulous, but Le Comptoir is more accessible to the area I stay in.

By the way, what's with all the "verrines" of food? Saw this both at Le Comptoir and at Aux Marches du Palais, where we had another enjoyable lunch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wondered the same thing. Turns out it's one of those sealable jars that the French use for storage. In other words, they bring the small jar what ever it is to your table, containing rillettes, or a baba, or foie gras confit etc.


Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wondered the same thing. Turns out it's one of those sealable jars that the French use for storage. In other words, they bring the small jar what ever it is to your table, containing rillettes, or a baba, or foie gras confit etc.

Yes, but where did this fad of serving in storage ware start? Seems like a wide swing of the pendulum from the elaborately decorated plates one used to see everywhere. Maybe a way of underlining the rusticity of the bistro food?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As of last week the next available table was in the first week of December. They'll start booking for January soon. That is a change in their opening policy of only 2 weeks in advance - they're trying to adapt to the huge demand. There is no waiting list but they do get cancellations of course so check back daily if you really want that weeknight gastro-bistro dinner table. When you do call remember that yes, as David said, it's the hotel receptionist who takes the restaurant reservations too - so don't call at busy check-in/check-out times. What's worked best for me is late at night. Good luck.

In the meantime, here's the link again to my blog post about my first dinner there with pix of each course:

Yves Camdeborde's Le Comptoir - Service Number 12.


Edited by Louisa Chu (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I am now able to answer a question that I've been hearing. No antiamericanism or any other type of discrimination enters the booking criteria at Le Comptoir. And no, the lady at the reception has no particular kind of prejudice. She is just not nice, period.

Last night at the hotel, I was sternly told that the restaurant was fully booked until January. Fine, I said, what about booking for January? I thought she was going to emit fireworks. "We don't have the registers", she snapped. No excuse, no comment, just a "get lost" attitude.

My personal opinion is that it's always nice to pop in for lunch and enjoy the great bistrot food, but as far as dinner is concerned, the place is not good enough for that sort of fuss.


Edited by Ptipois (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello,

I am now able to answer a question that I've been hearing. No antiamericanism or any other type of discrimination enters the booking criteria at Le Comptoir. And no, the lady at the reception has no particular kind of prejudice. She is just not nice, period.

Last night at the hotel, I was sternly told that the restaurant was fully booked until January. Fine, I said, what about booking for January? I thought she was going to emit fireworks. "We don't have the registers", she snapped. No excuse, no comment, just a "get lost" attitude.

My personal opinion is that it's always nice to pop in for lunch and enjoy the great bistrot food, but as far as dinner is concerned, the place is not good enough for that sort of fuss.

I was told dinner was all booked until mid nov when i called a week ago.

That's quite a change in a week.La regalade all over again.I agree its not worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone know how far in advance they take reservations?

It's prident to reserve at least four weeks in advance. The erasible chef is his same old self. I wanted to join a table of three and was told there was no way I would be able to join my (sic) dining companions.


Edited by JVB (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's prident to reserve at least four weeks in advance.  The erasible chef is his same old self.  I wanted to join a table of three and was told there was no way I would be able to join my (sic) dining companions.

Not even four weeks, not even six weeks. The other night, they were taking no reservations at all. And didn't condescend to explain when they would be taking them again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
La regalade all over again.I agree its not worth it.

sad but true.


chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just returned a few days ago from Paris.

Went to Le Comptoir twice for lunch!

Last Monday, four of us- just stopped in for lunch around 12:30, they immediately sat us down.

Food was absolutely delicious bistro food. Gorgeous lamb shank over cous cous with apricots and prunes and raisins, Brandade, the Nicoise was just okay, Mixed Saucisson appetizer that was wonderful, with blood sausage and who knows what else on that platter. Good wine-we had an Alsace Riesling from Ammerschwihr which was delicious. Nice people, saw the Chef, etc. Told the waiter we followed the Chef from La Regalade....the Creme Caramel we all split was on the house.

We asked if we could come back on Thursday for lunch for my birthday, and the waiter said to come around 12:30. Two of us got there at 12:15, the other two were very lost and didn't make it until 1:00. I was dying that they were late...."Pas de problem", the waiter answered, and gave us two glasses of delectable rose champagne for my birthday! Had Lobster bisque, scallop ceviche with caviar and roe-oh, dressed with delicious fruity olive oil and harissa! So delicate, thin slices of scallops, bits of black caviar! I don't remember the other entrees and plats....gorgeous rhum au baba...what else? I think we had a Morgon...plus at the end of the meal, four more glasses of Champagne appeared. 'Bonne anniversaire!'

Chef was waiting tables that day! I don't know if they were short handed or what, but he was having a good time, and really working! He seems to be hands on, likes what he's doing. He was present the entire lunch.

So, twice in a week, and both experiences were excellent.


Edited by TarteTatin (log)

Philly Francophiles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TarteTatin's experiences may put this back on my short list. Maybe the plan should be to drop by for lunch, maybe a little early, and have a back-up plan just in case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was next to Odeon yesterday around 4PM, looking for a snack before a movie, and finally did it to the Relais.

About reservations, I was told they were full booked until the end of january and they wouldn't take any new res. before that time. on the other hand the lady told me that they regularly have cancellations especially regarding the outdoor tables ( despite are they heated ).

As it has been said, lunch meal there is quite different from the eve. one ( which I gave a try last june-and was delicious). My friend & I shared a cheese plate & a "cochonailles" plate, that were more than good for a reasonnable price.


Let Eat Be

Food, Wine & other Delights

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently there is an HUGE difference between lunch &

dinner...so much so [per reflected above] that I must inquire

whether dinner takes place in the front bistro room??? [i

saw no other, but may have missed it.] Wiht different

accoutrements of dining??

We were in a tiny room...perhaps 12 cafe size tables..squished

here & there...no tablecloths or even sheet of paper. ..a juggling

act when wine or bread arrived...Since there were a few diners

seated outside, beneath a heated awning, the door opened about

every 1/2 minute or less, sending in gusts of Paris's damp,cold air.

So some patron sats w. their coats around their shoulders, this in

preference to the blankets they supplied for the outside diners!

But after some wine, it was hardly noticeable!

The menu was chalked on the board but I think I recall a printed

menualso....with a few offerings in each category. The entrees inc

an individual pots of terrine of foie gras, encased in its fat & juices

& a lobster bisque. We chose the creme legere of cepes which

was delicious. Thin slices of browned garlic floated on top and cepe

ravioli sat at the bottom of large lion head bowl.

My husband could not be talked out of the salade nicose which was, as

noted above, banal. My joue de boeuf was served in a cassarole w.

baby onions and carrots and some petite macaroni. It had a dense, dark

sauce which rendered it both very tasty and very salty.

Desserts ran to the 'regular'--creme bruleee, a pot of soft chocolate,

& a cheese plate. We were pleased w. our apple-mango tart tatin, served

warm w. vanilla ice cream.

The restaurant was bustling..tables changing...people unable to

be accomodated...service was casual....and towards the end of

service, the chef walked among the tables greeting all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Apparently there is an HUGE difference between lunch &

dinner...so much so [per reflected above] that I must inquire

whether dinner takes place in the front bistro room??? [i

saw no other, but may have missed it.] Wiht different

accoutrements of dining??

No - it's the same place to sit whether at lunch or dinner; the food, however, is completely different. In summer the "terrace" is nice but in winter, I dunno.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...