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I just made a big old batch of gumbo for fat Tuesday. The niftiest Andoille sausage from a local butcher, coupled with seared and roasted duck on the finish. I cooked my roux for a good hour and a half, very slowly, rich and brown. I was pleased as punch and wish I had some leftover for dinner tonight. think I'll do it again tomorrow!

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Recipes, too, I hope, Dean. I'm particularly curious about how you'll prepare the duck in gumbo #1. What andouille do you use?

I'll be using duck confit! Mmmmm. No real recipes -- just following the basic parameters y'all laid out here.

And I'll use whatever kind of andouille I can find around here. Nothing like the real, Louisiana stuff, methinks.

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

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  • 1 month later...

Gumbo tonight.

gallery_6263_35_13595.jpg

I'm going to call this "accidental" gumbo.

It started with me trying to figure out what to fix for dinner. Since the lid of the deep freeze was covered with folded clothes (it is in the laundry room), I resorted to the freezer part of my side-by-side.

I must digress and say that this freezer needs to be cleaned out and organized. It is full of little packets of stuff that seem to tumble out, threatening to break a toe. Many a dinner has been born that way.

So, out popped a package of about 4 boneless chicken thights. Then, I espied, just before it toppled out, a package of venison stew meat.

And, then there was that smoked andouille in the fridge. My local meat market makes what is a very garlicky, quite spicy "andouille" except that they don't smoke it. So, when I smoked some ribs this last weekend, I put some of those on to smoke.

This accidental dinner was absolutely outstanding. (And "soupier" than it looks in this photo.)

BTW, I like lots and lots of green onions on my gumbo.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Gumbo tonight.

gallery_6263_35_13595.jpg

I'm going to call this "accidental" gumbo.

It started with me trying to figure out what to fix for dinner.  Since the lid of the deep freeze was covered with folded clothes (it is in the laundry room), I resorted to the freezer part of my side-by-side.

I'm assuming that this means that it is now warm enough that you feel safe bringing the food in from the yard. :wink:

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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tuesday was cool so when i got back from the gym - chicken and sausage gumbo made with chicken thighs and emeril's kicked up sausage, red and green peppers, onions and green onions for garnish sefved with some beans and rice. not quite spicy enough for me so i added some jalapeno tabasco to my bowl. definitley helped break a sweat... and the sausage was pretty good.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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  • 2 months later...

It was very cool and cloudy last Friday, and when I went downstairs to look in the freezer to decide what to make for dinner, I espied a package of chicken thighs and one of venison stew meat. Neither of these on their own were enough for a meal, but then I was two lone andouille, and these three things screamed "Gumbo!"

So, venison, chicken thigh and andouille gumbo.

gallery_6263_35_86381.jpg

Gumbo really doesn't photo very well, does it?

Lesson learned with this batch. Never ever start your roux when the kids are walking in the door from their last day of school. But, good thing is that oil and flour are cheap! I have the leftovers in the freezer, and it is just the right amount for another meal. Although this batch had lots of meat, it was very nice and "brothy" which is just the way my family likes it!

Edited to add: I used about 1/2 chicken stock and 1/2 smoked turkey stock. The smoked turkey stock was a great addition. It elevated this gumbo to a new level!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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[...]

Gumbo really doesn't photo very well, does it?

[...]

Looks beautiful to me, Susan.

Yum! Gumbo would great for our foggy San Francisco "summer" as well. Thanks for bumping the thread.

Though, unless I'm mistaken, that looks an awful lot like Cilantro in the garnish...You got some sort of Mexican/Asian/Cajun fusion thing goin' on, up there in Minnesota?

:wink:

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Though, unless I'm mistaken, that looks an awful lot like Cilantro in the garnish...You got some sort of Mexican/Asian/Cajun fusion thing goin' on, up there in Minnesota?

:wink:

I love cilantro. And, it goes well in gumbo, IMHO. I actually almost thought about further fusioning this dish and offering lime wedges!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I love cilantro.  And, it goes well in gumbo, IMHO.  I actually almost thought about further fusioning this dish and offering lime wedges!

I'm certain that there is, absolutely, some kind of penalty for this behavior.

Eating this kind of thing is one thing, but bragging about it and encouraging others to emulate it, well, that's a horse of a different color.

I think, from here on out, you should just stick to butts. You can keep defiling your food in the way that you seem so cheery about, just keep your curtains drawn and don't discuss it with the neighbors-much in the same manner that you would hide a wanted fugitive from the prying eyes of the neighbors and the long arm of the law.

Thanks

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I love cilantro.  And, it goes well in gumbo, IMHO.  I actually almost thought about further fusioning this dish and offering lime wedges!

I'm certain that there is, absolutely, some kind of penalty for this behavior.

Eating this kind of thing is one thing, but bragging about it and encouraging others to emulate it, well, that's a horse of a different color.

I think, from here on out, you should just stick to butts. You can keep defiling your food in the way that you seem so cheery about, just keep your curtains drawn and don't discuss it with the neighbors-much in the same manner that you would hide a wanted fugitive from the prying eyes of the neighbors and the long arm of the law.

Thanks

Whatever, Brooks. And, I'm going to swim in the lake on Wednesday night. The temp of the water is in the low 50's, but I'll be there, on my back in the silky smoothness of Up North Water. And, there will be fireflies. We will be fortified with beverages (!) and some noshes on the dock. And, I'm hoping to lime a bit of my gumbo when I next eat it! Sort of gumbo meets Khao Soi.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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  • 1 month later...

I love cilantro.  And, it goes well in gumbo, IMHO.  I actually almost thought about further fusioning this dish and offering lime wedges!

I'm certain that there is, absolutely, some kind of penalty for this behavior.

Eating this kind of thing is one thing, but bragging about it and encouraging others to emulate it, well, that's a horse of a different color.

I think, from here on out, you should just stick to butts. You can keep defiling your food in the way that you seem so cheery about, just keep your curtains drawn and don't discuss it with the neighbors-much in the same manner that you would hide a wanted fugitive from the prying eyes of the neighbors and the long arm of the law.

Thanks

Whatever, Brooks. And, I'm going to swim in the lake on Wednesday night. The temp of the water is in the low 50's, but I'll be there, on my back in the silky smoothness of Up North Water. And, there will be fireflies. We will be fortified with beverages (!) and some noshes on the dock. And, I'm hoping to lime a bit of my gumbo when I next eat it! Sort of gumbo meets Khao Soi.

Lime wedges and cilantro in gumbo? Swimming in 50 degree water? What are we to do with these yankees, Brooks?

I made my first okra gumbo today, based on Paul Prudhomme's recipe for okra and shrimp okra. Let me say that this was a big step for me because I have always griped about tomatoes in anything called gumbo.

However. Tuesday's CSA box came with okra and collards and tomatoes and a (different) recipe for an okra and greens gumbo. We were planning on dinner anyway with the family we share the CSA box with, so I decided to go for it. I'm so glad I did! Yummy! PP is the master at flavor layering.

The recipe starts with a 1/3 cup of pork fat, which I knew had to be a good sign. I just sliced the okra instead of quartering lengthwise and slicing cuz that just seemed needlessly fussy. He also later calls for a stick of butter. I used half. I also halved the red pepper -- I am cooking for yankees and their children -- but it's still plenty spicy. I threw in the collards, which were not in the recipe, but I'm hoping will make up somehow for all the artery clogging otherstuff.

Unless I get a spectacular pic earlier, I'll skip the photo -- gumbo is not photogenic! I'll try to get a recipe posted though...

Oh, and my mom called (from Louisiana) while I was cooking, and she said, "You're making gumbo? In August? You really are Cajun." :biggrin:

Bridget Avila

My Blog

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  • 3 weeks later...

So, I'm teaching a class on gulf coast seafood on tuesday and am working on a good shrimp and sausage gumbo recipe. I was going to go all seafood, but the class includes oysters rockefeller, ceviche, stuffed flounder and crawfish etoufee. I think shrimp and sausage is enough. I thought about adding a ham hock to the recipe but does anybody think that it would get too "smoky?"

I have adapted this recipe from 5 well recieved ones on the internet. I will post it here for you all to see. I would appreciate any thoughts.

Shrimp and Sausage Gumbo

12 Servings

¾ Cup Vegetable Oil

¾ Cup Flour

2 Cups Chopped Onion

1 ½ Cups Chopped Green Pepper

1 Cup Chopped Celery

½ Tablespoon Salt

1 Tablespoon Cajun Seasoning (Whatever Brand You Like)

1 Teaspoon Cayenne

3 Bay Leaves

8 Cups Homemade Shrimp Stock

1 Ham Hock (Optional)

2 Pounds Medium Shrimp, Peeled and Deveined (Save Shells for Stock)

1 Pound Andouille Sausage, Sliced ½-¼ Inch Thick

¼ Cup Thinly Sliced Green Onions

¼ Cup Finely Chopped Parsley

File Powder (Optional)

2 Cups Cooked White Rice

2 Tablespoons Finely Sliced Green Onions, For Garnish

French Bread (Optional)

METHOD:

1.In a large heavy pot, heat the oil. When the oil is hot, whisk in the flour. Stir the mixture constantly for 15 to 20 minutes for a dark brown roux.

2.Add the onions, bell peppers, and celery. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the vegetables are softened.

3.Add the salt, Cajun seasoning, cayenne, and bay leaves. Cook for about 2 minutes. Add the stock and mix to blend with the roux. Add the ham hock if using and simmer for 1 hour and 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

4.Add the shrimp and cook for 5 minutes. Add the sausage, green onions, and parsley and cook for another 2 or 3 minutes. Remove from the heat. Season to taste with Cajun seasoning and salt. Add the file powder to thicken at the end if you wish.

5.Ladle the gumbo into shallow bowls. Plate a heaping portion of the rice in the center of the gumbo. Sprinkle green onions over the top. Serve with French bread and hot sauce.

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If I were teaching a class, I'd want to go for a more authentic approach and omit the ham hock. I think the sausage add just enough smokiness. You'll need to taste for seasoning, a little cayenne and black pepper might be needed. Otherwise, your recipe looks fine to me.

Make some red beans to use that ham hock. Serve with rice and plenty of sausage.

Stop Family Violence

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  • 3 weeks later...

I love cilantro.  And, it goes well in gumbo, IMHO.  I actually almost thought about further fusioning this dish and offering lime wedges!

I'm certain that there is, absolutely, some kind of penalty for this behavior.

Eating this kind of thing is one thing, but bragging about it and encouraging others to emulate it, well, that's a horse of a different color.

I think, from here on out, you should just stick to butts. You can keep defiling your food in the way that you seem so cheery about, just keep your curtains drawn and don't discuss it with the neighbors-much in the same manner that you would hide a wanted fugitive from the prying eyes of the neighbors and the long arm of the law.

Thanks

Whatever, Brooks. And, I'm going to swim in the lake on Wednesday night. The temp of the water is in the low 50's, but I'll be there, on my back in the silky smoothness of Up North Water. And, there will be fireflies. We will be fortified with beverages (!) and some noshes on the dock. And, I'm hoping to lime a bit of my gumbo when I next eat it! Sort of gumbo meets Khao Soi.

Lime wedges and cilantro in gumbo? Swimming in 50 degree water? What are we to do with these yankees, Brooks?

I bring to the table yet another horrow. It was cool and drizzley the other night, so I fetched a container of gumbo out of the freezer.

As we sat eating it under the lights of the dining room, Paul (he reall is a dear, but remember, he was raised on Lutheran MN meals -- cream of whatever, scalloped potatoes with ham -- add cream of whatever soup as the glue -- and jello salads, so forgive him) said "I think you should have added canned mushrooms.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I love cilantro.  And, it goes well in gumbo, IMHO.  I actually almost thought about further fusioning this dish and offering lime wedges!

I'm certain that there is, absolutely, some kind of penalty for this behavior.

Eating this kind of thing is one thing, but bragging about it and encouraging others to emulate it, well, that's a horse of a different color.

I think, from here on out, you should just stick to butts. You can keep defiling your food in the way that you seem so cheery about, just keep your curtains drawn and don't discuss it with the neighbors-much in the same manner that you would hide a wanted fugitive from the prying eyes of the neighbors and the long arm of the law.

Thanks

Whatever, Brooks. And, I'm going to swim in the lake on Wednesday night. The temp of the water is in the low 50's, but I'll be there, on my back in the silky smoothness of Up North Water. And, there will be fireflies. We will be fortified with beverages (!) and some noshes on the dock. And, I'm hoping to lime a bit of my gumbo when I next eat it! Sort of gumbo meets Khao Soi.

Lime wedges and cilantro in gumbo? Swimming in 50 degree water? What are we to do with these yankees, Brooks?

I bring to the table yet another horrow. It was cool and drizzley the other night, so I fetched a container of gumbo out of the freezer.

As we sat eating it under the lights of the dining room, Paul (he reall is a dear, but remember, he was raised on Lutheran MN meals -- cream of whatever, scalloped potatoes with ham -- add cream of whatever soup as the glue -- and jello salads, so forgive him) said "I think you should have added canned mushrooms.

While you're at it, why don't you add some cream of celery soup and a little Kraft Jalapeno Cheese Roll-that will really perk things up?

Sheesh, you guys just ain't right. I give lessons, you know-soon, you too could be a proud, downtrodden, adopted son or daughter of our not so fair but exotic as hell land. :wink:

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Brooks, to my credit, I did not think cilantro or lime, nor did I think of swimming in 50 degree water, and shuddered when he mentioned canned mushrooms. 25 years later, I'm still wondering what I got myself into.

My gumbo, even after a defrost was wonderful, and the teen pronounced it so. I've done at leat one thing right (she also shuddered at the mention of canned 'shrooms, which I'm sure have a place, I'm just not sure of the place).

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Canned mushrooms! OMG! Oh well. In the interests of domestic bliss, I guess that canned mushrooms have a place. At least, those 'shrooms have a place in our family favorite "muck" so I guess they could show up here.

How did mushrooms get into this discussion, anyway???

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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  • 1 month later...

Ok I am new to e gullit & have lived I Louisiana all my 50 years. I got a secret to tell yall chef John Folse is my cousin everyone in the family cooks as well as prof. chef's. I started reading this thead but did not read every page, On the okra subject It's a matter of preference or taste I don't like okra so I don't use it. Gumbo can be made with many types of meat vegies and spices It can be a empty the fridge. My favorite is seafood (shrimp & crab) gumbo with sausage, dark roux 1 15oz can tomatoes to a gallon of seafood stock (they will add flavor & cook apart) I read some post about thyme, I use a lot of it in my gumbo about 1/8 cup also I add liquid crab boil to the stock. So my recipe goes like this: seafood stock, trinity, dark roux (did you know this can be done in an oven?), tomatoes, andoulle, seafood, thyme, garlic, salt & pepper & liquid crab boil to taste.

Never never ever put file`powder in the pot if it will be reheated, instead sprinkle about 1/2 tsp on your rice then ladle on the gumbo. The crab boil adds a wonderful mystery flavor & heat to the dish so don't add cayenne pepper if using.

My friends have said my gumbo is the best they have ever tasted, I agree I have not tasted any even close, no bulls#@t!

Edited by 007bond-jb (log)
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007bodn-jb,

Your gumbo does sound very good, although I love okra so it is almost always included.

I have seen recipes for roux made in the microwave and I am familiar with the method of browning flour (dry) in the oven. Is your oven roux recipe different? if so, please share. I am always looking for ways to save myself the arm strain whne making dark roux.

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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007bodn-jb,

Your gumbo does sound very good, although I love okra so it is almost always included.

I have seen recipes for roux made in the microwave and I am familiar with the method of browning flour (dry) in the oven. Is your oven roux recipe different? if so, please share. I am always looking for ways to save myself the arm strain whne making dark roux.

Shell like I said gumbo is like a empty the fridg Cajun/Creole meal, you can add anything you like it's a matter of personal taste. My grand maw would add oysters I like em but not in my gumbo they get kinda rubbery when reheated. People use squirrel, turkey, frog legs, turtle meat, gator, duck, dove... I guess anything but beet's & beef would be fine. Although adding other veggies to a simple trinity you might call it soup. Correct me if I'm wrong, adding tomatoe would make it creole style gumbo. On the roux it is dry, started in the oven & finished on the stove. I try not to use more than 1 cup of flour per baking sheet for more even browning. Dry roux keeps well in the fridg also.

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  • 2 weeks later...

made gumbo after the HawkGawk today:

4 duck breasts

1 package of Shaller and Waller andouille sausage

red and green peppers

yellow and white onions

garlic

bay leaves

thyme branches

oregano

beef and chicken stock

then heresy of heresy - mustard greens

used the rendered duck fat with Wondra flour to make my roux - only 1 1/2 bourbons with branch

cajin napalm - herbage

stock then the stripped andouille(johnnybird for whatever reason will not eat sausage with skin on it - why we don't have many hotdogs here)

returned the shredded duck breast to the pot

had some baby mustard greens that begged out for inclusion - so i did. what a nice counter point to everyting else - a green that stands up to the spice.

since himself has only showed up will not serve it tonight but i have dinner for tuesday which is supposed to be wet and cold. some rice and i will be a happy camper

happy cooking all

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I made Fifi's gumbo from this post, and it was fantastic! Thank you so much for that recipe and all the clear instructions. I was a total gumbo novice, and I'm so glad I decided to try it.

I didn't have the nerve to take the roux as dark as in some of the pictures, so this batch turned out pretty thick. When I did a final tasting after it was done, my first thought was - this is way too rich. But it was perfect over rice. I ate half of it for lunch at work last week, and the other half is frozen with rice.

Oh, and I've never smelled anything quite like the chopped trinity hitting the roux - it's intoxicating. I'm glad this cookoff has been bumped up lately!

"Nothing you could cook will ever be as good as the $2.99 all-you-can-eat pizza buffet." - my EX (wonder why he's an ex?)

My eGfoodblog: My corner of the Midwest

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  • 2 months later...

gallery_8636_4165_220854.jpg

Made my first-ever gumbo last night using Mayhaw Man's Chicken and Sausage Gumbo demo. Sort of chickened out a bit on the roux (it got dark, but not quite Hershey's syrup dark - next time), and it was a little greasy (thanks to the less-than-stellar supermarket kiehlbasa I was reduced to)...

But it was DELICIOUS nonetheless. I am hooked. A little sauteed okra on the side.

Nikki Hershberger

An oyster met an oyster

And they were oysters two.

Two oysters met two oysters

And they were oysters too.

Four oysters met a pint of milk

And they were oyster stew.

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      This cook-off focuses on felafel. I've enjoyed fine felafel here in the US and overseas, but I have literally no idea how to make this, the national street food of at least a handful of Middle Eastern countries. Several people who have recommended this cook-off did so because, while they felt they had some clues, they didn't really have a consistently successful recipe or method. Sounds like a good cook-off topic, eh?
      There are a few topics on the felafel matter, including this one on tips and tricks, an older topic that finds more woes than techniques, and this preparation topic, How Do You Like Your Falafel? I also found this recipe by Joan Nathan, which seems like it might be useful.
      But what do I know? Not much, I'll tell you. Time to chime in, you!
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