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El Celler de Can Roca


pedro
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I have confirmed reservations for lunch at both Can Roca and Can Fabes for our trip this summer. The Can Roca website, while beautiful, does not identify prices or set menus. Can anyone give me an idea of what we may likely encounter in terms of prices for a tasting menu of 4-5 course. Ditto for Can Fabes.

Thanks in advance.

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I have confirmed reservations for lunch at both Can Roca and Can Fabes for our trip this summer. The Can Roca website, while beautiful, does not identify prices or set menus. Can anyone give me an idea of what we may likely encounter in terms of prices for a tasting menu of 4-5 course. Ditto for Can Fabes. 

Thanks in advance.

I'm sure someone else can confirm this, but I think Can Roca's menu is priced around EUR 70, while Santi Santamaria's goes for about EUR 150. Not including wine, etc.

Silly.

We''ve opened Pazzta 920, a fresh pasta stall in the Boqueria Market. follow the thread here.

My blog, the Adventures of A Silly Disciple.

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I'm sure someone else can confirm this, but I think Can Roca's menu is priced around EUR 70, while Santi Santamaria's goes for about EUR 150. Not including wine, etc.

Silly.

That's about right, but since I'm going to Can Roca tonight and to Can Fabes tomorrow, I will be able to re-confirm, not that I want to make you envious... :wink:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Can Roca was a really good and a suprise when i first ate there 5 years ago. It has gotten better and better with time. A very talented and focused chef (and brothers) with a great staff. I think the sky is the limit with them.

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Luis-

You left us with the promise of more about your meals . .

Yes, sorry, I've been pretty busy and forgot to come back to you...

We had dinner at Can Roca Saturday night, something that I try to avoid, but we were in the region for only a couple of days and it was the only chance. Saturday night is always busy, and we got a very small table for two. We paid 80 euros for a superb menu of new-ish or unusual dishes, includind a becada or a foie-gras and hazelnut turrón.

We drank superbly. Bonnes Mares 1999 from Dujac was cosmic. The wine list is very good, and the prices very reasonable. Ended at 3:00 AM after a good chat with the sommelier and some wine-people that were dinning on another table. They print out a menu for you with all that you've eaten and and all that you've drunk.

We tried to get a table at Carme Ruscalleda for Sunday luchtime, but it was fully booked. So we booked at Can Fabes. Sunday lunchtime is also something I try to avoid. And looks like others too... Santi Santamaría was not there. Nor was his wife or the sommelier.

The menu was 140 euros. The food was good but not great. Service was 'good enough'. Wine wervice was poor... The whole experience was very disappointing, especially when we had to fork out 250 € per head, having ordered a total of 3 bottles of wine for 4 from an overpriced wine list. And they don't print a menu for you. After the disappointment I cannot really tell you any dish sticked to my memory...

Sanceloni in Madrid is also very expensive, but I've eaten very well there. However, some have had better meals at Can Fabes, and I'm sure we were unlucky with the circumstances, but that's no excuse. We finished quite late, and they didn't let us look at the latest book Santi is selling there, claiming 'they were all sealed'. We wanted to look at it before buying. So we didn't buy it!

Cheers!

Luis

Edited by Luis Gutiérrez (log)
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Luis, if Can Roca was operating at the same level it was last summer, I can understand that in comparison, any other meal you had afterwards would seem a pale shadow of the former.

PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

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Luis, if Can Roca was operating at the same level it was last summer, I can understand that in comparison, any other meal you had afterwards would seem a pale shadow of the former.

Pedro, I'd say it was at the same level or even higher. You have to take into account that the knowledge and generosity of Josep Roca with the wines also helps a lot, at least for me. I'm lalready ooking forward to my next visit...

Cheers,

Luis

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Hello Luis,

Going to el Bulli for the second time in May, I've also booked a table at el celler de can Roca (based on all the good reviews on this forum)

Would you share with us the names of the differents dishes you enjoyed there ?

thanks a lot

Let Eat Be

Food, Wine & other Delights

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Hello Luis,

Going to el Bulli for the second time in May, I've also booked a table at el celler de can Roca (based on all the good reviews on this forum)

Would you share with us the names of the differents dishes you enjoyed there ?

thanks a lot

It will take some time, the menu is similar to the one at El Bulli (20+ dishes, big or small), but I'll do my best to do it sooner rather than later.

Cheers,

Luis

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Hello Luis,

Going to el Bulli for the second time in May, I've also booked a table at el celler de can Roca (based on all the good reviews on this forum)

Would you share with us the names of the differents dishes you enjoyed there ?

thanks a lot

Sorry for the delay and the poor English. I find it very difficult translating all this names (how the hell do you say 'crujiente' without sounding silly?), and I'm not used to doing it, so I've kept the Spanish too. I'm sure Pedro, Víctor and others will help me correcting it. Here it goes:

The menu at Can Roca, end of February 2005

Snacks

Black olives crunchy – Crujiente de aceitunas negas

Parmesan cookie – Galleta de Parmesano

Cod skin - Corteza de bacalao

Tapas

Carrot compote with corn ice cream – Compota de zanahoria con helado de maíz

Bergamot musseline with baby kidney beans and citrics – Muselina de bergamota con habitas y cítricos

Pigeon parfait with Bristol Cream gelatin – Parfait de pichón con gelatina de Bristol Cream

Menu

Anchovy, truffle and merlot – Anchoa, trufa y merlot

Foie-gras nougat – Turrón de foie gras

Scampi with orange smoke and pumpkin foam – Cigala al humo de naranja y espuma de calabaza

Artichoke royale with truffle – Royal de alcachofa con trufa

Smoked squid tartar – Tartar de sepia ahumada

Sea crab velouté with baby onions in cocoa and mint – Velouté de buey de mar con cebollitas al cacao y menta

Baby squid and onions – Pulpitos y cebollitas

Rougettes stuffed with its liver, orange and cardamom – Salmonetes rellenos de su hígado con naranja y cardamomo

Lamb carré with pigs trotter caneloni and peas – Carré de cordero con canelones de pies de cordero y guisantes

Becada royale – Royal de becada

Desserts

Eternity by Calvin Klein – Eternity de Calvin Klein

Frozen toffee biscuit, pain d’epices, dates compote, ginger and Venerable ice cream – Biscuit helado de toffe, pan de especies, compota de dátiles, jengibre y helado de Venerable

Petit fours

Semi sphere of orange liqueur – Media esfera de licor de naranja

Pineapple and star aniseed bombon – Bombón de piña y anís estrellado

Pain d’epices rock – Roca de pan de especies

Crunchy white chocolate and raspberry – Crujiente de chocolate blanco y frambuesa

Blood orange jelly – Gominola de naranja sanguina

Wines

Ca del Bosco Franciacorta Cuvée Annamaria Clementi Spumante

Trimbach, Clos St Hune 1997

Bonnes Mares Grand cru 1999, Domaine Dujac

Riesling Beerenauslese Juffer-Sonnenuhr 1995, Fritz Haag

Riesling Eiswein Brucke 1998, H. Dönnhoff

Bollinger RD 1990

Edited by Luis Gutiérrez (log)
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I recall two tasting menus when were were there some time ago. I don't recall one with quite so many courses. It appears Roca is moving towards that sort of menu, although it's quite possible that on our first visit, we were still being introduced the new cooking if Catalunya and too timid to fully give ourselves up to a chef whose work was unfamiliar to us and thus we neglected the longest menu. It was one of those restaurant visits that left us wanting to return quickly. For better or worse, threre were and are many other restaurants in and out of Spain that also beckon.

Those of us whose Spanish is still challenged, thank you for posting both the Spanish menu and the English translation, although based on our first visit and the reports posted on the forum, I suspect I am going to put myself and Roca's hands first and ask what I've eaten later. Once in a restaurant with a chef of the caliber of talent and creativity of Roca, it seems pointless to order shrimp, salmon, veal or lamb because one likes those things, but to allow the chef free range. I don't know how many people agree with me, and I will also admit that I don't always practice that philosophy as well as I preach it.

Were those wines offered by the glass or were you not eating alone. :biggrin: My question is really about whether they pair wines with the menu or not. I also have a very provincial side when it comes to wines. Although I have no trouble choosing French wines (or Spanish) when I'm at home in NY, I always try to drink locally, or at least nationally, when I travel and generally go out of my way to choose American wines for foreign visitors.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Were those wines offered by the glass or were you not eating alone.  :biggrin:  My question is really about whether they pair wines with the menu or not. I also have a very provincial side when it comes to wines. Although I have no trouble choosing French wines (or Spanish) when I'm at home in NY, I always try to drink locally, or at least nationally, when I travel and generally go out of my way to choose American wines for foreign visitors.

Bux,

I was not alone, but we were very thirsty anyway... :wink: I'm not sure about wines by the glass to go with the menu. Sometimes they bring you a glass of something when they think it goes really well with the dish. Other than that, riesling BAs ans eiswein usually come in half bottles, and we shared the Champagne with some more people including the sommelier until like three in the morning...

As far as drinking local, I agree when you travel abroad. But, do you always drink american wines when you dine in the States with your friends? I just try to drink what interests me from the list, wherever it comes from...

Cheers,

Luis

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Of course I didn't used to think that more than two bottles a person at dinner was excessive when I was younger. :biggrin:

As for American wines at home, I'm afraid that I seek them out for European guests because I think it's more interesting to drink something thay won't get at home, but we order them less often for ourselves, than we used to and they were never the mainstay of our wine diet.

I very much agree that having a choice from a wide selection makes things more enjoyable. From a traveler's point of view, I have noticed how shockingly high the prices for American wines are when one sees them on a list, but that same sticker shock is probably what a European gets here. From my point of view however, I think European wines are still able to complete favoraby here, which makes me believe that American wines can't compete except as a novelty in Europe. My interest in locality decreases with return visits as well. The first time I visit a restaurant in a wine area, especially when I have little or no familiarity with the area, I expect the restaurant to be able to make a good introduction for me to the wines of the area. Later on I'll relax more and look for wines I like from the country. At home, I'll look for the best (I can afford) rather than local.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Hi Koen,

Odds are even that you have already been to Gerona. I made a reservation for lunch at El Celler de Can Roca on the 9th of April. I'm told the youngest of the Roca brothers is supposed to be the best patissier in the whole of Spain. Chef Joan was trained in elBulli. Heard his steamed langoustines with lemon zest are superb.

Hotel: Castell d'Empordà in La Bisbal near Gerona. It's a medieval castle turned into a hotel/restaurant. Seven course menu for 55 euro! Owner is a dutch guy who made a fortune with 'Beter Bed' (sold the company and bought this castle instead). Chef Joachim used to work for Braakhekke. Wonderful location. Check their website for further information.

Greetings from Amsterdam,

Bonita

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With all this talk of Can Roca, I was beginning to fear a reservation might be getting as hard to get as at elBulli. Apparently that's not quite the case. They were ready to give me a table in April when I asked for May. I'm glad I noticed that the day and date didn't match when they confirmed my reservation or I would have been no-show in April and out of luck in May.

I didn't find an e-mail address for them or a web site. Admittedly I didn't look beyond the 2003 Michelin or the current Campsa site, but I included my e-mail address in my fax and they replied by e-mail. I assume e-mail is a reasonable way to reserve so I'm posting it here, along with the URL for the web site.

restaurant@cellercanroca.com

http://cellercanroca.com/

There appears to be a new high tech hotel in Girona which I don't believe was there three years ago. We also considered staying outside of Girona and closer to the restaurant to make the drive to dinner and back easier, but I was afraid I'd be tempted to hang out at the pool and not do any sightseeing. The last time we asked for driving directions from our hotel and they couldn't explain how to get there so we took a cab, which might make sense again this year even thought I've armed myself with maps from a number of web sites.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Hi,

Just in case your are still looking for a hotel in the vicinity of Girona: have a look at www.castelldemporda.com The owners serve excellent meals as well. The chef is called Joachim Muller (former chef of Le Garage, a renowned and trendy restaurant in Amsterdam).

El Celler de Can Roca: did you know mama Roca runs a restaurant next door? She serves local dishes at lunchtime. Price for a decent meal: 7,50 euro! She still feeds her sons Joan, Josep and Jordi every evening after closing time!

Cheers!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi Bux. I'm trying for a table in April too. I've just left my booking on their web site, (thanks to eGullet threads) but I don't have a tel or fax number. Could you possibly post them, as I'd like to cover off all angles if I don't get a reply to my email.

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