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Leftover Alaskan King Crab Legs


daniellewiley
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Tonight was Michael's birthday, and we went to our favorite seafood restaurant. It's pretty upscale, but wonderfully enough, they have a fabulous birthday special. Because it was his birthday, we got 50% off the food bill. So, of course, we ordered two of the most expensive dishes on the menu. He got lobster tail and filet mignon, and I got Alaskan King Crab Legs. And ate only half. :wacko:

So, I said I'd make some fancy crab salad for my lunch tomorrow. Michael was horrified. Here's where you all come in. I told him I'd have the eGullet crowd mediate. Don't you all think that a delicious crab salad served with an avocado half, perhaps, would be a great use of these leftovers? He said that if I added anything other than butter, it would be sacriledge.

If my crab salad idea is, indeed, wacko, what are some other ideas? I got 1.5 pounds of crab, and I ate half. It is all out of the shell already (my favorite bartender was moonlighting as a waiter, and he hooked me up).

Danielle Altshuler Wiley

a.k.a. Foodmomiac

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Nah, I wouldnt make crab cakes. Alaskan King Crab shouldnt be chopped up and used like Maryland lump blue crab meat. A Sushi roll or a summer roll is probably the best use, deep or pan frying the meat again is going to make it greasy and tough.

Another possiblilty would be to make lobster bisque, or a decent clam or corn chowder, and top the soup with chunks of king crab meat.

Yet another possiblilty is to toss chunks of the meat in a light mayonaisse/dijon mixture with a bit of dill and serve it on toasted hot dog rolls, and perhaps some chopped up celery, a la New England lobster rolls. Or try it on a sandwich roll tossed up in this sauce, which is used for Florida Stone Crab Claws, a type of crab that is similar in taste and texture to Alaskan crab and is served chilled:

http://foodgeeks.com/recipes/recipe.phtml?recipe_id=835

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Yet another possiblilty is to toss chunks of the meat in a light mayonaisse/dijon mixture with a bit of dill and serve it on toasted hot dog rolls, and perhaps some chopped up celery, a la New England lobster rolls.

Yes, this is exactly what I was thinking!! Thanks for the tip!

Danielle Altshuler Wiley

a.k.a. Foodmomiac

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Hmm, lots of butter, lots of good cheese, some fresh herbs, maybe some chiles and tomato, melt it all together, and make a killer crab dip to scoop up with whatever you wish to scoop with.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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Forgive me, Danielle, but are you referring to these?

gallery_11814_353_51088.jpg

I think all the suggestions are great, Jason's a la lobster rolls sound outstanding!

Happy birthday, Michael! :smile:

Edited by spaghetttti (log)

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Nah, I wouldnt make crab cakes. Alaskan King Crab shouldnt be chopped up and used like Maryland lump blue crab meat. A Sushi roll or a summer roll is probably the best use, deep or pan frying the meat again is going to make it greasy and tough.

Another possiblilty would be to make lobster bisque, or a decent clam or corn chowder, and top the soup with chunks of king crab meat.

Yet another possiblilty is to toss chunks of the meat in a light mayonaisse/dijon mixture with a bit of dill and serve it on toasted hot dog rolls, and perhaps some chopped up celery, a la New England lobster rolls. Or try it on a sandwich roll tossed up in this sauce, which is used for Florida Stone Crab Claws, a type of crab that is similar in taste and texture to Alaskan crab and is served chilled:

http://foodgeeks.com/recipes/recipe.phtml?recipe_id=835

Then you need to learn how to make Crab Cake's. A light saute to heat is all that's needed. And a fresh Aioli. Yum. :biggrin:

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Nah, I wouldnt make crab cakes. Alaskan King Crab shouldnt be chopped up and used like Maryland lump blue crab meat. A Sushi roll or a summer roll is probably the best use, deep or pan frying the meat again is going to make it greasy and tough.

Another possiblilty would be to make lobster bisque, or a decent clam or corn chowder, and top the soup with chunks of king crab meat.

Yet another possiblilty is to toss chunks of the meat in a light mayonaisse/dijon mixture with a bit of dill and serve it on toasted hot dog rolls, and perhaps some chopped up celery, a la New England lobster rolls. Or try it on a sandwich roll tossed up in this sauce, which is used for Florida Stone Crab Claws, a type of crab that is similar in taste and texture to Alaskan crab and is served chilled:

http://foodgeeks.com/recipes/recipe.phtml?recipe_id=835

Then you need to learn how to make Crab Cake's. A light saute to heat is all that's needed. And a fresh Aioli. Yum. :biggrin:

I think jason has a point, though. using alaskan king meat in crab cakes is like making burgers out of kobe beef. You can, and it will be kickass, but come on!

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Nah, I wouldnt make crab cakes. Alaskan King Crab shouldnt be chopped up and used like Maryland lump blue crab meat. A Sushi roll or a summer roll is probably the best use, deep or pan frying the meat again is going to make it greasy and tough.

Another possiblilty would be to make lobster bisque, or a decent clam or corn chowder, and top the soup with chunks of king crab meat.

Yet another possiblilty is to toss chunks of the meat in a light mayonaisse/dijon mixture with a bit of dill and serve it on toasted hot dog rolls, and perhaps some chopped up celery, a la New England lobster rolls. Or try it on a sandwich roll tossed up in this sauce, which is used for Florida Stone Crab Claws, a type of crab that is similar in taste and texture to Alaskan crab and is served chilled:

http://foodgeeks.com/recipes/recipe.phtml?recipe_id=835

Then you need to learn how to make Crab Cake's. A light saute to heat is all that's needed. And a fresh Aioli. Yum. :biggrin:

I think jason has a point, though. using alaskan king meat in crab cakes is like making burgers out of kobe beef. You can, and it will be kickass, but come on!

I guess that is why they use the much tougher Dungeness crab in the cakes. :laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Forgive me, Danielle, but are you referring to these? 

gallery_11814_353_51088.jpg

I think all the suggestions are great, Jason's a la lobster rolls sound outstanding!

Happy birthday, Michael! :smile:

Yep! THat's what I had - they were awesome - I had unfortunately filled up on bread and salad. I'm going out to get some fresh dill, some hot dog buns and a new jar of mayo this morning. I'll take pics.

Danielle Altshuler Wiley

a.k.a. Foodmomiac

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I think jason has a point, though. using alaskan king meat in crab cakes is like making burgers out of kobe beef. You can, and it will be kickass, but come on!

I guess that is why they use the much tougher Dungeness crab in the cakes. :laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Dungeness crab in a crabcake would be equally wasteful in my opinion, although I have heard of it being done in the Pac NW and in San Francisco where Dungeness is priced to go. On the East Coast, Dungeness is very expensive, and Maryland Blue is a lot cheaper. Typically you see dungeness meat in sauteed dishes in Asian restaurants if you see it used that way at all here.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Forgive me, Danielle, but are you referring to these? 

gallery_11814_353_51088.jpg

I think all the suggestions are great, Jason's a la lobster rolls sound outstanding!

Happy birthday, Michael! :smile:

Actually those appear to be Snow Crab clusters, King Crab's white trash cousins...

=Mark

Give a man a fish, he eats for a Day.

Teach a man to fish, he eats for Life.

Teach a man to sell fish, he eats Steak

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I think jason has a point, though. using alaskan king meat in crab cakes is like making burgers out of kobe beef. You can, and it will be kickass, but come on!

I guess that is why they use the much tougher Dungeness crab in the cakes. :laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Dungeness crab in a crabcake would be equally wasteful in my opinion, although I have heard of it being done in the Pac NW and in San Francisco where Dungeness is priced to go. On the East Coast, Dungeness is very expensive, and Maryland Blue is a lot cheaper. Typically you see dungeness meat in sauteed dishes in Asian restaurants if you see it used that way at all here.

You dont say? Dungeness is pretty damn cheap here (SF bay area) and ive seen it 1/3 the price of king crab legs per pound on several occasions. I still never use the stuff because, quite frankly, theyre a bitch to get enough meat out to amount to anything. :raz:

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