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Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)


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Yesterday's dessert was a Bavarian goody. Does anyone know what we had?

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Look like elderflower fritters to me!

I made a batch of David Lebovitz' Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream last night for dessert, it was divine :wub:

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Look like elderflower fritters to me!

I made a batch of David Lebovitz' Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream last night for dessert, it was divine  :wub:

"Elderflower fritters" thank you for the English term. That's what I was looking for.

Elderflowers dipped into a soft white wine dough and deep fried in ghee, sprinkled with powdered sugar and cinnamon.

H.B. aka "Legourmet"

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Last night we had some more of the blueberry cheesecake I made on Saturday.

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WOW. That is the greatest picture I have ever seen. Maybe its because I studied all day for a Geography exam. Lahars, volcanoes, lava... you get the idea.

Edited by Lumas (log)
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The red spot on top is the rose syrup, right? And do you use an only cream recipe? I prefer 1:1 milk to cream.

Btw, I split and filled the Chocolate Canola Oil Cake with pastry cream--the pastry cream was a disaster, and I will now just stick with the PH recipe.

It's good, but I think it's needs a teeny bit less baking soda (I can smell it). It doesn't have that awful chemical smell chocolate cakes made only with cocoa and no chocolate have. I will be making this again, so thanks for sharing, gfron!

Also, if you bake it in a 9 inch pan, it takes more than 45 minutes. Underbaking gives you a sticky, almost gooey cake, which isn't necessarily a bad thing--I know this because I underbaked it.

The red spot is the syrup...just used to zoom up the flavor a bit. And this panna cotta used 3 C. half and half with 1 C cream - I'm not one to worry about health or weight :rolleyes:

Glad to know you made it work. In general I think in individual servings so my translations to 9" or other larger formats is a guess at best, plus you always have to determine what effect altitude will have, although I do normally post sea level recipes.

BTW, my other favorite easy pastry cream recipe is from Dorie's book with Julia Child. Its a microwave version that I've yet to have fail. Its not quite as refined as PH's, but no one has ever noticed when I've served it to them and its done in minutes with little effort on my part.

It's not the health/weight thing. I just don't like the all cream texture. Haven't really had time to play with the dozen panna cotta recipes I have.

I live at sea-level.

PH's recipe wasn't the problem. It was that I decided to try another recipe and that other recipe was the problem. LOL. My special kitchen skill is that custards do not scramble on me.

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Yesterday's dessert was a Bavarian goody. Does anyone know what we had?

gallery_23358_2572_203536.jpg

gallery_23358_2572_152830.jpg

Are those Queen Anne's Lace? My dad told me about something like these, but I've never had them. He had them while travelling through Germany.

"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

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Hi pjm, the image link you posted is broken. You have to view the image in imageGullet, then click on the link to the right of the large version of your pic, saying "click for actual url."

I'm guessing this is the image you meant to post?

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That's indeed very pretty! I bet it tasted great too!

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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Hi pjm, the image link you posted is broken. You have to view the image in imageGullet, then click on the link to the right of the large version of your pic, saying "click for actual url."

I'm guessing this is the image you meant to post?

gallery_8997_4689_34329.jpg

That's indeed very pretty! I bet it tasted great too!

jumanggy,

Thanks for your help ! I e-mailed egullet for help with posting a picture but obviously could not figure it out, Glad you liked it !

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Are those Queen Anne's Lace? My dad told me about something like these, but I've never had them. He had them while travelling through Germany.

Elderberry is a fruiting tree that produces clusters of tiny black berries that make a good jelly to serve with game. The flowers are used to make a cordial as well as fritters. I have also seen elderberry juice recommended to treat flu.

I believe Queen Anne's Lace is the name for wild carrot, at least in England that name is used. I think they flower at the same time.

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Yes, Queen Anne's Lace or wild carrot (Daucus carota) is different from Elderberry (Sambucus). I forgot to comment about this earlier but I wanted to say the stems sticking out of the fritter looks cool and a little creepy (wow, it awakened the 8 year-old boy in me)! And, I just found out that the stems are poisonous. Coool (ok, bedtime for the 8 year-old)

pjm333, no problem. The "tuna" looks like a slice of a large strawberry. Is it? I have no idea what the other flavors are (one looks like a canteloupe to me). What made me smile the most is the "wasabi." Is it wasabi flavored ice cream or green tea ice cream?

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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Apple Galettes with Walnut Streusel from Fine Cooking October 2004. A link to the recipe can be found on my blog, if you'd like it. It is my husband's very favorite apple pie.

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-Becca

www.porterhouse.typepad.com

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Yes, Queen Anne's Lace or wild carrot (Daucus carota) is different from Elderberry (Sambucus). I forgot to comment about this earlier but I wanted to say the stems sticking out of the fritter looks cool and a little creepy (wow, it awakened the 8 year-old boy in me)! And, I just found out that the stems are poisonous. Coool (ok, bedtime for the 8 year-old)

pjm333, no problem. The "tuna" looks like a slice of a large strawberry. Is it? I have no idea what the other flavors are (one looks like a canteloupe to me). What made me smile the most is the "wasabi." Is it wasabi flavored ice cream or green tea ice cream?

jumanggy,

The flavors are poached rhubarb,mango,melon & pieapple and it was a green tea ice cream..I think I sold over 50 of them which was surprising.

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I made this Terrine of Almond Panna Cotta and Pineapple Gelee based on Clement's wonderful blog A la Cuisine! I don't know what his id on eGullet is, so wherever you are Clement, thanks! I changed coconut to almond because... I hate coconut.

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And here's the cut surface:

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Also, I made chocolate chip cookies using some leftover margarine. Man, were they greasy! And almost too soft and fall-apart-y. But they tasted great.

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Since we're running out of airtight containers, I stored them in a square 1/2 gallon plastic ice cream carton. The Filipino's favorite container that can be recycled 10^6 times. :smile:

Edited by jumanggy (log)

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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Finished off the remains of a block of maple cream - just ate it straight, with a fork (classy, I know - but, mmm, pure sugar)

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Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

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From my Nana in Canada :wub:

I think the way you make is just boil down maple sugar until it's lost enough liquid to become solid. The texture is almost exactly like fudge, but the only ingredient is maple syrup. So good - hence the eating it with a fork :smile:

Edit: As usual, Wikipedia has a better answer

Edited by lexy (log)

Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

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Shortcakes (ala Alton Brown - first up on Google) with strawberry rhubarb compote (Olives Dessert Table Cookbook) with fresh whipped cream. Easy and quick. And leftovers are great for breakfast.

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We had a couple of these Essence of Chocolate squares tonight - I made them earlier today for the weekly treat day tomorrow. Intense, rich and quite decadent.

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I was worried that they might have been to a bit too gooey, but they were firm enough to cut nice and clean.

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We had a couple of these Essence of Chocolate squares tonight - I made them earlier today for the weekly treat day tomorrow.  Intense, rich and quite decadent.

gallery_51259_4126_526.jpg

What cookbook did those come from? They look awesome, and I don't even like chocolate that much! Or maybe it's just your picture of them that's awesome...

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